Concept Carz Home Concepts and PrototypesAbout Follow ConceptCarz on Facebook Follow ConceptCarz on Twitter RSS News Feed
 
 ManufacturersArrow PictureLocomobileArrow Picture1899 Locomobile Stanhope Style I 
 

1899 Locomobile Stanhope Style I news, pictures, specifications, and information

The first prototype gasoline-powered Locomobile was completed at the company's factory in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Francis and Freelan Stanley created the original steam-powered Locomobile in 1898. 'Yankee tinkerers,' the Stanley brothers had been working on designs for steam-powered carriages for many years. Success came when one of their cars appeared at a Boston fair in October 1908. Interest in their cars, stemming from the debut of their lightweight, affordable vehicle, led them to undertake the construction of one hundred cars. To put the brothers' ambition in perspective, one need only recognize that the largest American gasoline-powered auto producer in the country, Alexander Winton, made twenty-two cars in 1898; Pope Electric of Hartford, Connecticut, produced a few dozen. The Stanley Brothers' resolve to 'mass-produce' inexpensive cars marked an important transition in automobile manufacturing.

But only a few months into their venture, the Stanley Brothers sold their enterprise to Amzi Barber, America's sheet-asphalt tycoon. It was under Barber's direction that the Locomobile name became a brand. The 1899 Locomobile sold for $600 and, as its advertisements boasted, it was noiseless and odorless. Refreshing to think of, but the Locomobile's water tank held only twenty-one gallons, enough for just a twenty-mile journey. Besides, starting a steam-powered engine was time-consuming and dangerous, as boilers frequently burned out. The gasoline burners that heated the boilers could backfire, potentially setting the car on fire. Sales of the Locomobile peaked in 1900 at sixteen hundred, a remarkable figure at such an early date. The total was far greater than any other American automaker could produce and it rivaled the French automaker, De Dion-Bouton, as the greatest car production in the world. Sales fell the next year, however, as the primacy of gasoline-powered automobiles was established. Gas-powered cars could go farther, faster, and wîth fewer hassles than steam-powered cars of comparable sizes. Barber hired automobile engineer Andrew Riker to design him a gas-powered vehicle. The car he designed sold for $5,000. The new Locomobile appealed to rich consumers, and the company shifted its focus from low-cost production for the masses to high-cost production for the elite few. The last Locomobile steamers were produced in 1904. The end of the steam era saw the end of the company's importance. Other firms had been building gas-powered automobiles better, for longer. Locomobile survived through World War I producing trucks for the war market. After the war it became one in the overflowing market of luxury cars. The company died in 1929 after having been briefly incorporated into one of William Durant's holding companies.

Charles A. Yont and W.B. Felker completed the first automobile trip to the summit of Pikes Peak, Colorado, on this day, driving an 1899 locomobile steamer. Climbing 14,110 feet to the top was quite a feat for the little steamer. Pikes Peak is well known because of its commanding location and easy accessibility, and the view from the summit is said to have inspired the song 'America the Beautiful.'

Source - Unknown
Runabout
Chassis Num: 33
 
Sold for $71,500 at 2007 RM Auctions.
Identical twin brothers Freelan Oscar and Francis Edgar Stanely were one of the first motorcar producers in the United States and one of the more successful in steam powered car production. Freelan Oscar and his wife are credited with being the first individuals to drive an automobile to the top of New Hampshire's Mount Washington on August 31st of 1899. Their Locomobile steam runabout took two hours and ten minutes to climb the slope, excepting the time required to refill the boiler with water. Their journey took about half the time required by a team of horses.

The Stanley brothers had created a successful business in manufacturing photographic plates. When the world was introduced to the motor car, the brothers began to tinker. By the autumn of 1897 they had produced their first motor car, with their automobile business opening in November 1898.

Their cars were shown at the Boston motor show in 1898 but prior to this, John Brisben Walker, publisher of Cosmopolitan magazine, acquired about buying the business. The brothers quickly stated a very high sum of $250,000, which was accepted, to much surprise of the Stanley brothers. The brothers were appointed as General Managers. To aid in the acquisition, Walker took Amzi Lorenzo Barber as partner in this venture. Barber had made a fortune paving America's cities and was known as 'The Asphalt King.' By June of 1899, deliveries of the Locomobiles had begun.

Almost as quickly as these acquisitions and alliances formed, they began to degrade. Quarrels between Walker and Barber broke out which later led to Barber running the Locomobile production on his own, with the help of his son-in-law Samuel Davis. In the very early 1900s they significantly changed the Stanley brothers designed. By 1904, Barbed decided to leave Locomobile.

This vehicle is an 1899 Locomobile Steam Runabout that sits on a wheelbase that measures 66-inches and is powered by the 3.5 horsepower twin-cylinder double-acting steam engine and powers the rear wheels through a single chain drive. Its wheelbase is longer than that of a standard runabout. There are wooden artillery wheels wearing Lincoln Highway 28x3 tires. The original wheels measured 28x2.5.

The standard boiler size was 14-inches in diameter, this example has a 16-inch boiler. The engine is a 'Number 5' type which was introduced around 1901, after around 3,000 examples had been produced. This is chassis number 33, meaning it was treated to modifications after it left the factory, later in its life.

This vehicle was offered for sale at the Vintage Motor Cars sale at Hershey, PA presented by RM Auctions. It was estimated to sell for $25,000 - $30,000 and offered without reserve. Bidding quickly surpassed the estimates with the final bid settling at $71,500.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2007
Runabout
 
Locomobile was started in 1899 by the Stanley Brothers, who produced photographic plates. This car was delivered by train to Mr. Taylor in Kalamazoo, Michigan on January 24th of 1900. The car was eventually sold to a Mr. Upjohn.

This car has a folding top which is very rare on this model, and spindle seats. The car has a leather covered deck lid with exhaust pipe coming thru it. The first car had no exhaust pipe and later cars had a metal cover. The engine is a two-cylinder steam, 14-inch boiler. The cylinder is gasoline fired, which had to heat gas to a vapor to start, a 30 to 40 minute warm-up before you had steam. You could go 20 miles per tank of water.

It has a 5.5 horsepower rating, and the car weighs 850 lbs. Total production was 2050, and it is believed that only 7 remain today. The selling price was $750.
Runabout
Chassis Num: 389
 
Sold for $46,800 at 2006 Bonhams.
Sold for $63,250 at 2011 RM Auctions.
Locomobile build 337 steam runabouts in 1899. The 927cc twin-cylinder double-acting steam engine delivered 3.5 horsepower and had single chain drive and a differential brake. It wears an older restoration which still shows well in modern times.

The editor and publisher of Cosmopolitan magazine, John B. Walker, purchased the plans for a steam runabout from Francis and Freelan Stanley for $250,000. He then sold half interest to asphalt contractor Amzi Barber for the same amount. The name Locomobile was chosen as it combined locomotive and automobile. Locomobile set up shop in the Stanley's Watertown, Massachusetts factory. Unfortunately, the union between Walker and Barber lasted just two weeks. Barber kept the Watertown premises and Walker went to Tarrytown, New York to build the same car as the Mobile.

In 1900, Barber moved to Bridgeport, Connecticut and hired the Stanley brothers as managers. Within just two years of time, they had built 4,000 two-cylinder runabouts.

In 2011, the car was offered for sale at the Amelia Island sale presented by RM Auctions. It was estimated to sell for $50,000 - $70,000 and offered without reserve. As bidding came to a close, the car was sold for the sum of $63,250 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2011
Runabout
 
The Locomobile stearn runabout was one of the first automobiles in America to be built in any quantity. By May of 1902 about 4,000 units had been built. Power was from a vertical, steam, 2-cylinder engine that offered 3 horsepower at 400 RPM. The runabout weighed 700 pounds and originally cost $600.
Runabout
 
In 1899, the Locomobile Company of America was founded to build automobiles based on design plans for a steam car which they acquired from the Stanley brothers. The Stanleys were hired as general managers and though the steam Locomobiles were unreliable and difficult to operate, over 4,000 examples were built by 1902.

In 1902, the Locomobile Company began producing a gasoline-powered vehicle and in 1903, dropped steam-powered cars from their lineup.

During the Boer War, Locomobile was the first automobile used in war serving as a generator and searchlight vehicle. They were particularly useful in British eyes for its ability to brew a cup of tea by tapping the boiler.

Steam cars were difficult and time consuming to use, as water was brought to a boil and could be exciting if the boiler burned out or the gasoline burner backfired setting the car on fire. The 21 gallon water tank limited trips to about 20 miles.

The 1899 Locmobile sold for $600 and sales peaked at 1,600 in 1900 making it the second highest selling car in the world. However, sales fell the following year as simpler gasoline-powered cars gained popularity.

This example has a Stanhope body with a single bench seat. It was fully restored by the current owner without the benefit of parts availability or even a manual. He first ran the car on compressed air since he was afraid to fire the burner.
NATALIE WOOD'S 300 SL ROADSTER JOINS STUNNING LIST OF ENTRIES FOR RM'S AMELIA ISLAND SALE
• RM Auctions announces additional highlights for its 16th annual Amelia Island sale, held March 8th at the Ritz-Carlton • Recent entries are led by a 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster that was originally owned by Hollywood actress Natalie Wood • As the official auction house of the world-renowned Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance, RM's single-day sale will feature a roster of more than 80 handpicked automobiles • A frequently updated list of consignments is available online at www.rmauction...[Read more...]
Esteemed Pray Collection To Headline RM's 16Th Annual Amelia Island Sale
• RM Auctions announces exceptional estate collection of Malcolm S. Pray Jr. for its 16th annual Amelia Island sale, March 8 • Renowned businessman and philanthropist's collection features no less than 17 automobiles, headlined by a 1937 Delahaye 135 Competition Court Roadster by Figoni et Falaschi that he owned for half a century • Held in conjunction with the famed Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance, RM's well-established single-day sale will feature a roster of more than 80 blue-chip motor c...[Read more...]
Duesenberg Model SJ Sells For $4.51 Million and Records Tumble At RM'S Amelia Island Sale
• RM Auctions continues strong track record at Amelia Island, Florida posting more than $26.8 million in sales with 92 percent of all lots sold • Top seller: stunning 1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Walker-LaGrande Convertible Coupe realizes a spectacular $4,510,000 to claim the title as the most valuable automobile sold during this year's Amelia Island weekend • Five lots achieve individual million-dollar-plus results • Packed auction room sees bidders hail from 14 countries around the world [...[Read more...]
FULL STEAM AHEAD FOR HISTORICS
• Stanley Steamer takes centre stage for spring sale
Brooklands will provide the backdrop for the ultimate MPV – built long before the category was even invented – when a 1917 20hp Stanley Mountain Wagon crosses the 'block' on Saturday March 9th for Historics' spring sale. Having sold their dry plate photographic business to Eastman Kodak, twin brothers Francis E. Stanley and Freelan O. Stanley decided to set up the Stanley Motor Carriage Company in order to manufacture steam powe...[Read more...]
Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance Honors The Genius Of Porsche's 911 at 50
Porsche's 911 has defied common wisdom, outlived its competitors and, from roots in the early Sixties, leads Porsche Cars into a new century as the only car built today that carries its engine behind the rear axle. At 4:00 PM on Friday, March 8th, 2013 in the Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance presents 'THE PORSCHE 911 SEMINAR: PORSCHE'S FLAGSHIP at 50'. The Porsche 911 Seminar will be empaneled by a pride of Porsche 911 legends. Brumos Porsche's Hurl...[Read more...]


Collectible: A Gathering of the Exceptional and Captivating
Similar Automakers
AmericanChalmers
ChandlerEMF
LozierMarr
MercerNational
PaigePenn
Pierce ArrowSimplex
StelliteStevens Duryea
Stoddard-DaytonStutz
 
Locomobile: 1891-1900
Similar Automakers
Locomobile History
Other models by Locomobile


 
Model 30
Model 40
Model 48
Type E

© 1998-2014. All rights reserved. The material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.