Image credits: © Bugatti.

2006 Bugatti 16.4 Veyron news, pictures, specifications, and information
Hardly any other technical development has influenced the life of men as much as the automobile and hardly any other design development has been as fascinating as automobile designing. In this context, the Bugatti name has a very special meaning. Right from the beginning of automobile designing, Ettore Bugatti and his son Jean signed for genial creations and made them timeless works of art.

Surely, there will always be a great responsibility towards the tradition of this name brand, even if the design of a new Bugatti vehicle has to be, quite obviously, oriented towards the future.

Apart from traditional influences, the premise for designing the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 are subject as well to developments in the technical realm.

At the outset of a project development, it is important to follow an approach allowing for a wide variety of ideas. Many exceptional historic car models stimulated the search for a large number of elements of the design of the Bugatti Veyron. Over weeks and months, hundreds of sketches, drawings and conceptual presentations were worked on. Step by step, the most promising ideas and concepts were filtered out and brought on to the next stage of realization: to the phase of three dimensional models.

At first, a relatively large number of Veyron models were created in a small scale, until here again a clear-cut decision had to be made to finally move on to a more realistic model in a 1:1 scale.

On this model, which is based on a basic construction of wood wîth different layers of clay permitting experiments in every conceivable direction, the final design down to the smallest detail will eventually emerge.

The completely elaborated clay model then becomes the basic tool to lead to the final design decision.

AerodynamicsFor the Veyron 16.4 high speed sports car, the aerodynamics are of great importance.

The smallest modifications of the external form, specially at the front and rear spoilers, will be felt in terms of drag and drift behavior. In a wind tunnel and using a 1:4 model - true in every detail - of the Bugatti Veyron, the free-stream velocity and drift behavior of the vehicle was examined.

Únder such conditions the sports car was tested up to a speed of 400 km/h. Speed plays a decisive role at such research proceedings, because the aerodynamic forces increase exponentially wîth higher speeds. For instance, double the speed from 100 to 200 km/h, mean, consequently, a multiplication by a factor of four of the aerodynamic forces.

Through increased drift forces, higher wheel loads can be achieved, meaning that greater forces may be transferred through the tires. It follows that the Veyron can attack bends at higher speeds, it has an improved braking deceleration and a noticeably higher traction when accelerating out of a bend.

Research in the wind tunnel must establish that the free-stream velocity does not fail under any circumstances and the drift remains high enough at all times to assure the excellent driving performance of the Veyron 16.4.

Likewise, the optically most noticeable aerodynamic component, the tail wing, is perfected in the wind tunnel. An equally important share in the development work is taken up by designing the frontal air intake openings and the air flow below the vehicle. Whereas a flat underbody between the wheel axles is advantageous for the air flow, the front spoiler serves to cause a suction effect, the so-called 'ground effect'.

The Bugatti engineers were aiming at an optimal aerodynamic balance, which results in an almost neutral driving performance at the highest possible wheel load values. The values measured in the wind tunnel are collected and are directly fed into the channles of the ongoing engineering work. In this way, even the slightest aerodynamic adjustments and improvements may be taken into account practically minutes before starting the production process.

Transmission

If it were not a solution specifically created for the Bugatti Veyron 16.4, the new seven-gear transmission could have come from the Royal Class of motorcar sports. The transmission is sequentially switched through toggle switches on the §teering wheel. There is no clutch. The double clutch system permits switching times of maximally 0.2 seconds. The engine power gets to the wheels through a continuous 4-wheel drive.

Interior

The interior of the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 is a 'whole new world' by itself in terms of exclusivity, quality of workmanship and functionality: the feeling for something very special uninterruptedly continues into the interior of the car. Sportive and luxurious elements form here a unique symbiosis, whose function interconnection instantly becomes apparent in the interaction of the individual components so genially set in harmony wîth each other and which on first sight conveys a maximum of superiority. The instruments of the Bugatty Veyron 16.4 wîth its large centrally located tachometer and the four surrounding additional instruments recall the legendary car racing past of the trademark. By the way, this particular feature clearly demonstrates, that virtues of car racing, such as doing without something superfluous, provides not only an interesting contrast to today's trend to overloading, but also conveys the impression of a harmonic perfection in the overall concept of the interior and, in this way, emanates a uniquely concentrated and uncompromising sportiveness. An optimal sound in the interior is provided by a high-end sound system built by Dieter Burmester, Berlin's Hi-Fi manufacturer par excellence. The functional switches embedded into the instrument panel, the center console and in a module on the sky are designed as precious and stylistically consistent toggle switches. Their traditional apparance underscores the sportiveness of the interior.

Source - Bugatti
The trials of the fastest road sports car in the world have been successfully completed. One of the most ambitious projects in automobile history is entering its production phase. The first Bugatti Veyron 16.4 cars, built mainly by hand, are already being completed and will be delivered to customers this year.

The sports car, capable of more than 400 km/h, is driven by a 16-cylinder mid-engine, that at 710 mm long is no larger than a conventional V12 unit, and due to its lightweight construction weighs only about 400 kilos. Its compact dimensions are due to the unique arrangement of its cylinder banks in a W configuration. Two VR8 blocks, each wîth a fifteen degree bank angle, are joined in the crankcase to form one engine. Both eight cylinders are set at an angle of ninety degrees to each other and are aspirated by a total of four exhaust gas turbochargers. The engine delivers 1001 HP at 6,000 r.p.m. and provides a maximum torque of 1250 Newtonmetres at between 2,200 and 5,500 r.p.m.

To apply the power of the 64-valve unit to achieve satisfactory driving dynamics both in everyday traffic and on the racetrack, the Bugatti development team of Dr. Franz-Joseph Paefgen and Dr. Wolfgang Schreiber has realized a propulsion unit that is without parallel in its complexity. If the extreme engine power is a master stroke of genius, its conversion for road use is an equally tough challenge. As Dr. Schreiber says 'For 1000 HP propulsion power, the system demands approximately 2000 HP to be additionally generated as heat energy during combustion. Half in each case is dissipated in the exhaust gas and cooling water'.

To do this, the Bugatti engine has two water circuits. The larger of the two wîth 40 liters of cooling water has three coolers in the front section of the car, to keep the engine at operating temperature. The second circuit, called the low-temperature system, has a separate water pump and contains 15 liters of cooling water. These are used to cool, by up to 130 degrees, the charged air, heated during compression in the turbochargers, in two heat exchangers mounted on the engine. The cooled, charged air then passes through two 'air manifolds' into the combustion chamber, which it then leaves as exhaust gas at approximately 1,000 degrees. It then passes through the turbines of the exhaust gas turbochargers. This causes the exhaust gas to expand, so that it is cooled by up to about 150 degrees, is then cleaned in the catalyzer and exhausted.

In addition to its unique compactness, the high performance of the power unit is the centrepoint of the development. Lightweight materials are used that not only result in a low power-to-weight ratio but also particularly provide the spontaneous response of the moving engine-internal masses. In addition to piston rods of titanium, the so called 'easy runners', the eight-stage oil pump integrated into the crankcase for dry sump lubrication has light aluminum gears. Because the arrangement of the 16 cylinders ensures extremely quiet running, only a small flywheel is needed. The use of motor sport technology is evident not only from the plasma-coated running faces of the cylinders but also by the use of high-strength steel for the shafts and gears in the aluminum crankcase.

Únique in engine design is the integration of knock and misfiring detection in an ion current system. Because the multiplicity of cylinders means very quiet running and ensures that the velocity difference will be extremely small in the event of a cylinder misfire, cylinder-selective detection by measuring rough running is not reliable enough. Therefore, Bugatti Ion Current Sensing (BIS) is used. The ion current flowing at each spark plug at the timepoint of ignition is monitored by a separate evaluation sensor system. The data obtained is passed to both engine control units. If knocking combustion or a misfire is detected, the associated control unit immediately initiates countermeasures, such as retardation of the ignition timepoint, shutdown of the cylinder or reduction of the charge pressure. According to the head of Bugatti Únit Development Gregor Gries, 'The aim of our technology is
to generate the maximum performance from the engine in a stable, clean manner'.

The power generated in the engine is transferred to the flange-mounted direct manual gearbox (DSG). The torque and speed is then transmitted, through the gearing of seven forward and one reverse gear, via a universal drive to the front axle gearbox and via a second universal drive, along the right side of the engine to the rear axle gearbox. Both the DSG and both axle gearbox housings are of lightweight aluminum construction. The drive power is distributed to the front and rear axles by means of a Haldex coupling, an actively-controlled multi-disk, inter-axle lock directly connected to the front axle gearbox. The following front axle differential distributes the power to both front wheels. In the rear axle differential the power is distributed to the rear wheels via a bevel gear and a further differential. In addition, an actively-controlled, hydraulically-actuated, multi-disk differential lock is installed here. When necessary, it prevents speed differences between the rear wheels and ensures optimum directional stability when accelerating and when cornering under load. All load distribution functions are completely automatic and are undetected by the driver.

The Bugatti marque has since earliest times been regarded as a central force in the advancement of automobile development by innovative solutions. A position deservedly maintained by the first high-performance sports car of the modern Bugatti.

Source - Bugatti Press

From 11th to 18th October 2005, the new Bugatti Veyron 16.4 was presented in Madonie in Sicily, an area known throughout the world as the setting for one of the most illustrious motor races, the Targa Florio. For the first time, on the roads of the legendary course and on the Autodromo di Pergusa in Enna, a wider group of media professionals were able to convince themselves of the qualities of this new super sports car. As Dr. Thomas Bscher, President of Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S., explained: 'It is no accident that Bugatti is presenting the new Veyron here in Sicily. Since the acquisition of the rights to the name in 1998, we have not only built a new car, but have also breathed new life into one of the world's most prestigious automobile marques. And it was on the course of the Targa Florio in the 1920s, wîth its Type 35 Grand Prix racers – a model that made a vital contribution to the renown of the marque – that Bugatti achieved its most famous victories. Here in Castelbuono I can state clearly – and this is a source of pride for us all – the Bugatti marque is alive and the new Bugatti Veyron 16.4 will ensure its future!'

Another car, 50 years down the roadIn 1956, the final attempts had failed, in the wake of the death of the company's founder in 1947 – preceded in death in 1939 by his son Jean, wîth whom he collaborated – to keep the substantially weakened company alive. After 47 years' production, in the course of which 7,950 Bugattis of models 13 through 251 had been manufactured, the gates to the Bugatti factory in Molsheim were forced to close. Today, nearly 50 years later to the day, the production of Bugatti automobiles in Molsheim is resuming, making Molsheim once again the hub of the Bugatti world. As a centre for reminiscence, picturesque town near Strasbourg has never lost its significance. The area's 'Enthusiasts Bugatti Alsace', together wîth their friends in the various Bugatti clubs throughout the entire world, are in large measure responsible for keeping the brand alive over the decades – even in the absence of the product itself. This is an experience in which various other prestigious automobile brands wîth melodious names have not shared. It is in this fact that the strength of the Bugatti brand values is expressed most clearly. The admiration for 'art on wheels', the bold pursuit of the aesthetic conviction of Ettore Bugatti, a man who was first and foremost an artist, not a technician. The grandeur of the victories in
the glorious years of dirt-encrusted heroes on the racetracks of this world and, not least, the suitability of these racing cars for everyday driving – which made Bugatti cars accessible to a broader clientele. The prestige of inspired design and the exclusiveness of individual models that helped catapult certain Bugatti models into the astronomical price classes.

1998 through 1999: Four design studies in 15 months time

In April 1998, the Volkswagen Group took over the Bugatti trademark, presenting the brand to the public for the first time at the International Motor Show in Paris wîth a study for a two-door coupé it had commissioned Italdesign to create: the Bugatti EB 118. A few months later, in March 1999, at the Geneva Motor Show, a design of the EB 218, itself also created at Italdesign, caused a sensation wîth a four-door saloon using the same 18-cylinder, 6.3 litre engine wîth 555 hp. This was followed the same year, at the IAA in Frankfurt, by the centre-engine design, the Bugatti EB 18/3 Chiron; once again Giugiaro was responsible for the design. And shortly thereafter, in Tokyo, the Bugatti EB 18/4 Veyron celebrated its world premiere, a model designed at the 'Volkswagen Centre of Excellence Design' under the directorship of Hartmut Warkuss. Less than a year later, in autumn 2000 in Paris, the Veyron 16.4 was shown for the first time. The Bugatti Veyron 16.4 wîth the ultimate in performance features, the 1,001 hp, 8-litre, 16-cylinder engine and its technological specifications – 1,250 Nm at 2,200 rpm, top speed of more than 400 km/h, four turbochargers and permanent four-wheel drive, features that have remained in place to this day – celebrated its debut at the IAA in Frankfurt in September 2001.

2003: New team – new objectives

In 2001, the decision was made to go into series production of the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 wîth a maximum of 300 cars. In December of the following year, 'Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S.' was established, a subsidiary of 'Volkswagen France' wîth headquarters in Molsheim. And nearly a year to the day thereafter, at the end of 2003, Dr. Thomas Bscher took overall charge of the Bugatti project as the new President of 'Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S.' Appointed to assist him was Dr. Wolfgang Schreiber, serving as technical director and simultaneously as head of 'Bugatti Engineering GmbH' in Wolfsburg, where all of the development work for the new Bugatti is co-ordinated and, in part, carried out. His task was to put the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 on the road.

The new team subjected the entire project to a technological and financial feasibility study commissioned, among other things, to develop a realistic timeframe for the launch of production of the new Bugatti. Shortly before the 2004 Geneva Motor Show, the Executive Board at the Group approved plans for the 'new' Veyron project, scheduling production to begin in September 2005. This schedule has been met to this day.

The Veyron: An unrivalled synthesis of top performance and the everyday

This is made all the more remarkable by the fact that the Bugatti Veyron 16.4, despite its very limited production, is called upon to meet all of the specifications of the VW Group in their entirety. This means innumerable time-consuming trials and tests throughout the entire world, all devoted to the fulfillment of a single objective: to measure up to the strict, indeed relentless quality and quality-assurance standards the company has laid down. This ensures that this super sports car will be suitable for everyday driving as well, to a degree never before witnessed in any other series-production vehicle of this type. In the world of modern, series-production automobiles, the synthesis which has been brought to fruition in the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 is between easy and problem-free operation in day-to-day traffic and breathtaking driving in the high-performance area. A reference which would be music to the ears of Ettore Bugatti, whose early successes were themselves rooted in this unique combination. Extensive construction work in MolsheimParallel to the ongoing activities in the product area, extensive construction work has been launched at the location in Molsheim. To begin with, the Château St. Jean – an edifice that Ettore Bugatti never used as a residence but rather only as a form of what, in today's parlance would be termed a customer service centre –, was completely renovated. The two stalls located to the south and the north of the castle, which in Bugatti's day served as stables, were telemetrically surveyed, dismantled and, using as many of the original elements of the structure as were still usable, such as wall §egmènts and woodwork, reconstructed in a faithful copy of the original structures. In this new 'Bugatti Era', these structures will for the most part have an administrative character; in one of the spaces, clients will also be able to take possession of their Bugatti Veyron in a historical setting.

The core of the investments made in Molsheim is the 'Atelier' in which production of the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 is beginning in September 2005. In its architectural form, this modern production facility has been given stylistic features dipping back into the history of the automotive brand. With a southern exposure, the light-filled, glazed main hall is only partly evocative of an automobile-manufacturing operation in the classical sense of the term – it reminds the beholder more of a 'Formula One laboratory'. The setting is dominated by clinical cleanliness and precision workmanship wîth highly developed component parts. And yet the 'Atelier' can still hold its own against the 'major players'. A runway for the measurement of relevant functional performance data and a generously proportioned water-spraying system for testing vehicle water tightness are to be found here, alongside a light chamber under the glaring lamps of which the slightest inconsistency in a car's paintwork mercilessly catches the eye. A small test course has been laid out in the green spaces in front of the building. It can be used to supplement the road-test program compulsory for all Veyrons and which concludes the vehicle's production process. A logistics centre erected next to the 'Atelier' rounds off the complex of buildings in Molsheim.

Historic location

Thanks to Bugatti, Molsheim has been elevated from anonymity to find its own place on the map – not just of the automotive world. And this is certainly justified, as it was the location of both Ettore Bugatti‘s production facilities and his adjacent private residence. In purely geographical terms, circumstances have changed somewhat since the purchase of the Château St. Jean and the property surrounding it , which covers 140,000 m2 and on which all other modern-day Bugatti activities take place. To be precise, the property is situated in Dorlisheim which, while within sight of the former Bugatti factory, is nevertheless located on the other side of the Bruche River. This has been the source of inspiration for a 'postal sleight of hand' on the part of the new management at Bugatti. To be able to carry the historic value of the location in Molsheim into the Bugatti future while at the same time satisfying the administrative regulations of the federal state, a compromise was negotiated wîth local authorities. A Solomonic solution was arrived at wîth the latter, who took a very favourable view of the entire Bugatti project right from the beginning, providing their active support through-
out its development. The correct and complete address of Bugatti 'Cru 2005' is: Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S., 1, Château St. Jean, Dorlisheim, F-67 120 Molsheim.

Bugatti is on the threshold of a new era. Its location is Molsheim. The company is international. Ettore Bugatti was born in 1881 in Italy. He completed his technological instruction in Germany, first wîth de Dietrich in Niederbronn in Alsace – at the time still a part of Germany – and then at Deutz in Cologne, before he built his first automobile in 1909 in Molsheim. Since 1998, Bugatti has belonged to the Volkswagen Group as a French company wîth a French headquarters.

The modern-day Bugatti team – every bit as international as the company itself – views the legacy of Ettore Bugatti as both a challenge and an obligation. As Dr. Thomas Bscher, President of Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S., explained: 'Here in Sicily, a chaptera chapter was written in the history of Bugatti. And this is where we are launching the first chapter of the new story. In addition to the heritage and the values of the Bugatti marque, we have also taken over its future. The Targa Florio stands for its past, while the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 stands for the 21st century.'

Source - Bugatti Press
Coupe
Chassis Num: VF9SA15B36M795001
Sold for $1,815,000 at 2015 RM Auctions.
The accolades of the Bugatti Veyron have been well documented, dramatized and analyzed from nearly every possible vantage point. What a colossal of an automobile. But for all of the records achieved by the 16-cylinder exotic none can touch combining the mind-bending speed with the fact of being the very first production model, at least not unless the Veyron in question is the first, 001.

When completed in 2006, chassis 001 afforded the public, albeit a very exclusive public, the first awe-inspiring supercar since the McLaren F1 of the 1990s. But what the McLaren achieved in cutting-edge simplicity and rawness, the Veyron bested in true Bugatti style, adding elegance and luxury to brutish, blood-curdling, face-warping performance.

Although three hundred examples of the Bugatti Veyron coupe would be produced, this car, chassis 001, would perhaps be the most important supercar of the early 21st century. Sure, there were certainly others, and there are certainly other supercars, but this one remains the first, the first of what has to be, to date, the most technologically advanced car in history.

Chassis 001 would be finished in an elegant two-tone color scheme of red and black and would first make its way to Beverly Hills, California. It would be a momentous occasion for those at Bugatti as the delivery represented the culmination of a dream that had been some eight years in the making.

Replete with incredible technological advancements including its hydraulically-operated rear spoiler, carbon-ceramic disc brakes, seven-speed semi-automatic sequential gearbox and no less than two V-8 engines and four turbochargers coupled together, the Veyron would not merely represent the pinnacle, but a whole new altitude reached in supercar design. Despite being a bit beefy in the weight department, the more than 1,000 horsepower ensure that chassis 001 is capable of reaching more than 250mph!

It was perhaps fitting 001 was first delivered to Beverly Hills. A setting known for its movie stars and extravagance, there was really no other supercar at the time that represented extravagance, even a bit of eccentricity, like the Veyron.

The car has remained a fixture around the Beverly Hills area. Fitting right in, 001 has been at home in California for nearly a decade. However, the car has not been limited in its travels. In fact, being perhaps the most important Veyron ever produced the car has not been sitting idle in some garage. One trip that was an absolute must would come just this year.

Veyron, chassis 001, would be prepped for shipping and would end up on its way overseas in early 2015. Bugatti was bringing its production of the Veyron to an end after ten years and just 450 examples.

In anticipation of the celebration of Bugatti's 10 year production run of the Veyron at the 2015 Geneva Auto Show, chassis 001 would be shipped to Europe for the occasion. The first had to be there with the last. This was only appropriate and right in remembrance of such a remarkable supercar.

The iconic, ground-breaking and momentous Bugatti Veyron, chassis 001, would be offered to the public for sale as part of the RM Sotheby's auction held in Monterey in August of 2015. Though nearly a decade old, the Veyron remains virtually brand new with less than 800 miles accumulated over the years.

A modern collectible for sure, there is no question as to the place the Veyron occupies within the collector car world. But, if there is one that stands above the rest, this would be it. As a result of its importance, chassis 001 would garner pre-event estimates ranging from $2,500,000 and $3,000,000, noteworthy estimates for the final homage to Bugatti's return to greatness.

By Jeremy McMullen
The trials of the fastest road sports car in the world have been successfully completed. One of the most ambitious projects in automobile history is entering its production phase. The first Bugatti Veyron 16.4 cars, built mainly by hand, are already being completed and will be delivered to customers this year.

The sports car, capable of more than 400 km/h, is driven by a 16-cylinder mid-engine, that at 710 mm long is no larger than a conventional V12 unit, and due to its lightweight construction weighs only about 400 kilos. Its compact dimensions are due to the unique arrangement of its cylinder banks in a W configuration. Two VR8 blocks, each wîth a fifteen degree bank angle, are joined in the crankcase to form one engine. Both eight cylinders are set at an angle of ninety degrees to each other and are aspirated by a total of four exhaust gas turbochargers. The engine delivers 1001 HP at 6,000 r.p.m. and provides a maximum torque of 1250 Newton metres at between 2,200 and 5,500 r.p.m.

To apply the power of the 64-valve unit to achieve satisfactory driving dynamics both in everyday traffic and on the racetrack, the Bugatti development team of Dr. Franz-Joseph Paefgen and Dr. Wolfgang Schreiber has realized a propulsion unit that is without parallel in its complexity. If the extreme engine power is a master stroke of genius, its conversion for road use is an equally tough challenge. As Dr. Schreiber says 'For 1000 HP propulsion power, the system demands approximately 2000 HP to be additionally generated as heat energy during combustion. Half in each case is dissipated in the exhaust gas and cooling water'.

To do this, the Bugatti engine has two water circuits. The larger of the two wîth 40 liters of cooling water has three coolers in the front section of the car, to keep the engine at operating temperature. The second circuit, called the low-temperature system, has a separate water pump and contains 15 liters of cooling water. These are used to cool, by up to 130 degrees, the charged air, heated during compression in the turbochargers, in two heat exchangers mounted on the engine. The cooled, charged air then passes through two 'air manifolds' into the combustion chamber, which it then leaves as exhaust gas at approximately 1,000 degrees. It then passes through the turbines of the exhaust gas turbochargers. This causes the exhaust gas to expand, so that it is cooled by up to about 150 degrees, is then cleaned in the catalyzer and exhausted.

In addition to its unique compactness, the high performance of the power unit is the centrepoint of the dvelopment. Lightweight materials are used that not only result in a low power-to-weight ratio but also particularly provide the spontaneous response of the moving engine-internal masses. In addition to piston rods of titanium, the so called 'easy runners', the eight-stage oil pump integrated into the crankcase for dry sump lubrication has light aluminum gears. Because the arrangement of the 16 cylinders ensures extremely quiet running, only a small flywheel is needed. The use of motor sport technology is evident not only from the plasma-coated running faces of the cylinders but also by the use of high-strength steel for the shafts and gears in the aluminum crankcase.

Únique in engine design is the integration of knock and misfiring detection in an ion current system. Because the multiplicity of cylinders means very quiet running and ensures that the velocity difference will be extremely small in the event of a cylinder misfire, cylinder-selective detection by measuring rough running is not reliable enough. Therefore, Bugatti Ion Current Sensing (BIS) is used. The ion current flowing at each spark plug at the timepoint of ignition is monitored by a separate evaluation sensor system. The data obtained is passed to both engine control units. If knocking combustion or a misfire is detected, the associated control unit immediately initiates countermeasures, such as retardation of the ignition timepoint, shutdown of the cylinder or reduction of the charge pressure. According to the head of Bugatti Únit Development Gregor Gries, 'The aim of our technology is
to generate the maximum performance from the engine in a stable, clean manner'.

The power generated in the engine is transferred to the flange-mounted direct manual gearbox (DSG). The torque and speed is then transmitted, through the gearing of seven forward and one reverse gear, via a universal drive to the front axle gearbox and via a second universal drive, along the right side of the engine to the rear axle gearbox. Both the DSG and both axle gearbox housings are of lightweight aluminum construction. The drive power is distributed to the front and rear axles by means of a Haldex coupling, an actively-controlled multi-disk, inter-axle lock directly connected to the front axle gearbox. The following front axle differential distributes the power to both front wheels. In the rear axle differential the power is distributed to the rear wheels via a bevel gear and a further differential. In addition, an actively-controlled, hydraulically-actuated, multi-disk differential lock is installed here. When necessary, it prevents speed differences between the rear wheels and ensures optimum directional stability when accelerating and when cornering under load. All load distribution functions are completely automatic and are undetected by the driver.

The Bugatti marque has since earliest times been regarded as a central force in the advancement of automobile development by innovative solutions. A position deservedly maintained by the first high-performance sports car of the modern Bugatti.

Source - Bugatti
 
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8-Liter
EB110
Royale
Type 101
Type 13
Type 23
Type 35
Type 37
Type 38
Type 39 and Type 39A
Type 40
Type 46
Type 50
Type 51
Type 55
Type 57
Type 59
Veyron

2007 16/4 Veyron Image Right
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