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Image credits: © Chevrolet. GM Corp

1997 Chevrolet Camaro news, pictures, specifications, and information

CHICAGO — The Camaro, celebrating its 30th birthday in 1997, has evolved considerably. Over the years, the Camaro has been transformed into many shapes, from the pony car look of the late ‘60s to the polished, muscular styling of the ‘90s. Camaro is built for those lòòking for a high-performance sports coupe without a high price tag — it's the car for those craving power and safety wrapped in a sleek body. To commemorate three decades of success, Chevrolet has introduced an anniversary package loaded wîth nostalgia.

The 30th Anniversary Camaro Z28 package, available on convertibles and coupes, joins the stable of 1997 models. Reminiscent of the 1969 Z28 pace car, the commemorative edition vehicle is a bright Arctic White color wîth Hugger Orange stripes down the center. (The 1969 Camaro, wîth its Ermine White exterior and the same stripes, paced the Indianapolis 500.) The door handles on the Anniversary Package Camaro are also white, as are the white five-spoke aluminum wheels and the front fascia intake.
Most of the glass on the 30th Anniversary Camaro is Solar-Ray® glass. This reduces interior heat buildup and helps protect interior fabrics and materials from ultraviolet rays. The seats are Arctic White wîth cloth black-and-white houndstooth inserts.
All 1997 Camaros, including the Anniversary Package, have low-profile windshield wiper arms for a more aerodynamic design. A raised cowl panel minimizes turbulent airflow and reduces wind lift. In addition, the cowl lessens 'blow back' — moisture that moves up the windshield — when the vehicle is in motion.
Goodyear Eagle GS-C P245/50ZR-16 radials help keep 'The Hugger' gripping the asphalt.
A redesigned instrument panel highlights the inside of the special-edition vehicle. All controls are easy to find and access. The instrument panel has bold, analog instrumentation. The climate-control switches are backlit so they're easier to see.
Floor mats and headrests feature 30th Anniversary five-color embroidery.
To increase comfort and support, all Camaros have newly designed front bucket seats.
Automatic Daytime Running Lamps are standard on all 1997 Camaros. They join other standard safety features such as four-wheel, anti-lock disc brakes, driver and front passenger air bags and a reinforced steel safety cage that includes steel side-door beams and front and rear crush zones.
All Camaros come standard wîth an electronically controlled AM/FM stereo wîth cassette player and extended range speakers. A compact disc player is also available. Other option packages for coupes include a Delco Electronics 200-watt audio system, as well as a 12-disc CD changer.

History Highlights

1967 — The first-generation Camaro debuts and also paces the Indianapolis 500®.
1968 — Camaro is nicknamed 'The Hugger' because of its road-hugging suspension.
1969 — Camaro again paces the Indianapolis 500.
1970 — Second-generation Camaro hits the streets. Z28 is also introduced, featuring a 360-hp, LT1 350-cid V8 engine.
1982 — Third-generation Camaro is born; Z28 is named Motor Trend's 'Car of the Year;' Z28 paces Indy 500.
1987 — Convertible body style returns.
1993 — Present day Camaro is introduced; Z28 paces Indy 500.
1996 — Camaro Super Sport returns after a 24-year absence; 30th Anniversary Z28 paces Brickyard 400®.
1997 — 30th Anniversary of the Camaro.

Source - GM Corporation

What's New

Chevy Camaro represents 30 years of uncompromised American sports coupe performance. In fact, while other entries departed from their 'pony car' lineage over the years, Camaro has been a consistent force on the automotive scene, remaining true to its original image and mission. As a result, it's still unequaled today among its top competitors in 0–60 and quarter-mile acceleration, lateral g performance and slalom timing.

For 1998, the best gets better, as Chevrolet unveils the refined Camaro model lineup at the 1997 Chicago Auto Show. The '98 Camaro, which arrives in dealer showrooms this fall, is the next logical evolution in a proud performance legacy, sporting a more contemporary look, more V8 horsepower and torque, better fuel economy and a quieter ride. And, as a bonus, this Camaro meets 1999 federal emission standards ... one year early.

Here are some details on the latest generation of America's definitive performance car:

The 1998 Camaro comes in several models and body styles: The standard model, RS appearance package and Z28 are all available in either coupe or convertible versions. And now, the SS performance and appearance package is factory installed.
On the outside, Camaro's front end has an all-new hood, front fenders, front fascia, headlamps and windshield wiper system. The 1998 Camaro headlamps are composite and utilize reflector optics for better nighttime visibility. All models now feature body-colored door handles for a coordinated look. The Chevrolet bowtie logo is embossed on the underside of the hood blanket.

Exterior changes give the 1998 Camaro an aerodynamic front end. Said Werner Paulus, GM total vehicle integration engineer: 'The new exterior has evolved into a contemporary, pleasing, aerodynamic and nimble look. The styling changes give the car a softer, sleeker appearance.'

At the core of the Camaro is power ... the heart-thumping performance that sports car buyers demand. And the 1998 model delivers. A version of the 1997 Corvette's LS1 V8 powers the new Z28 and SS. In the Camaro Z28 and SS, the engine develops 305 hp at 5200 rpm, and 335 lb.-ft. of torque at 4000 rpm. This is an improvement over the 1997 Z28 of 25 hp and 10 lb.-ft. of torque. The standard model Camaro comes equipped wîth the 3800 V6, at 200 hp it's still one of the most powerful V6s in its class. The V8 is mated to a Borg Warner-designed T56 manual transmission manufactured by Tremec, and the V6 is coupled wîth a Borg Warner-designed T5 transmission, also made by Tremec.

Camaro's fuel economy is improved over 1997, as well. The 1998 model wîth V8 manual power achieves an estimated 18 mpg in the city and 27 mpg on the highway, versus 16/27 for the 1997. Equipped wîth an automatic transmission, ratings are estimated at 19 mpg city, 23 highway. (Economy ratings are adjusted, based on GM tests. EPA figures are not yet available.)

For ‘98, Camaro builds upon its road-hugging reputation. The suspension system has been tuned for better ride and handling, wîth revalved shocks in the front and rear, and increased spring rates.

The ‘98 Camaro SS features 17-inch Goodyear P275/40 ZR17 tires that provide improved performance feel and a smooth ride, while delivering better traction in snow. The spare tire is now 16 inches in diameter, up from 15 inches.
Four-wheel disc brakes are now standard across the lineup to provide more efficient brake cooling, resulting in more consistent stopping ability.
Antilock brakes are standard on all Camaro models (ABS is an option on the Ford Mustang). The Camaro ABS system is all-new, and is sourced from Bosch. It has fewer parts, weighs less and provides a shorter stopping distance than the old system.

The Camaro's new state-of-the-art optional traction control system (available on Z28 and SS) is reliable in all weather conditions and at all speeds. The traction control system functions through the use of brake pressure modulation, engine spark and throttle control.

The exhaust system includes an upgraded muffler — engineers added an aluminum coating to the muffler's cavity to improve corrosion protection and increase life. And both the V6 and V8 have larger mufflers for a more consistent, pleasing exhaust sound ... that still reminds drivers it's an American sports coupe.

The LS1 Engine
Now it's Camaro's turn. After debuting in the 1997 Corvette, the all-new LS1 V8 engine has been modified and made available for the 1998 Z28 and SS. Most of the changes to the engine were performed for packaging and operating efficiency. Yet, like the LS1 in the Corvette, the Camaro version features aluminum heads, rods, pistons, deep-skirt block, crank, oil pan and more. Bottom line ... the LS1 is built to perform ... and leave the competition behind.

Said John Juriga, LS1 project manager for GM Powertrain: 'The LS1 engine in the 1998 Camaro weighs about 10% less, fully dressed, than the LT1 engine it replaces. The result is an engine that's lighter, more powerful and quieter.'

Specific modifications for Camaro include:

• Engine accessory mountings have been relocated to provide better belt life, improved engine balance and reduced noise and vibration.

• Accessory drive (specific to Camaro).

• Air conditioning compressor (more rigidly mounted on lower right of engine).

• Dipstick and tube (right side of the block).

• Electronic oil level sensor (right side of the oil pan).

• Air-cleaner (forward of radiator).

• Air-cleaner base (upper radiator support).

• Alternator (positioned lower).

• Power §teering pump (upper left side of engine).

In addition, the air-cleaner element is more conveniently serviced via a slide-out cartridge design.
The RS Appearance Package
For '98, the Camaro also offers an RS Appearance Package, available as an option on the standard coupe and convertible. It's designed for those who want a more distinct appearance for standard Camaro models. It includes:

• A front fascia extension for a sleeker look.

• Rocker panel moldings to carry that treatment along the bodysides.

• A rear fascia extension to round out the rear end.

• A spoiler unique to the RS package.

• Sporty aluminum wheels.

The SS Performance and Appearance Package
It's the ultimate Camaro driving experience ... and now, it can be served up direct from the manufacturer. After several years as an aftermarket option, the SS performance and appearance package is a new factory-installed option for 1998. The package can be ordered through Chevrolet dealerships. Here's a look at what the package contains:

• Planned horsepower increase — to be determined.

• Forced-air induction system.

• Hood design unique to the SS.

• Wide footprint, 17-inch Goodyear P275/40 ZR17 tires.

• Rear spoiler wîth light-emitting diode (LED) center high mount stop lamp.

• New 3-inch stainless steel exhaust tips.

• Power §teering cooler.

• Special high performance ride and handling package specific to the SS.

• SS badging/decals.

For Camaro SS drivers, life is defined by two key words ... 'move over.' In a few months, the next logical evolution of the classic Chevrolet performance car will arrive ... one that remains true to a proud 30 year lineage of sports coupe performance ... the 1998 Chevy Camaro.

Source - Chevrolet

CAMARO CELEBRATES 30TH BIRTHDAY IN 1997

For three decades, Chevrolet Camaro has exemplified the spirit, power and raw muscle of American 'pony cars.' Camaro celebrates its 30th birthday in 1997, and Chevrolet is planning several ways to commemorate this milestone. For starters, Camaro receives the honor of serving as this year's official Brickyard 400® pace car. It will be the third straight year that a Chevrolet has paced the NASCARs at the renowned Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Then, Chevrolet will offer Camaro Z28 wîth an optional 30th Anniversary Appearance Package, similar in appearance to the pace car, but without the Brickyard graphics.
Included in the 30th Anniversary Appearance Package is a distinctive Arctic White exterior wîth white door handles, white front fascia intake and black emblems. Enhancing this unique look are center stripes and hood extractors in 'Hugger' Orange, reminiscent of the classic '69 Z28. White five-spoke aluminum wheels (chrome aluminum wheels optional) complete this eye-catching exterior.

The interior of this special Camaro Z28 has a number of unique features as well. These include 30th Anniversary embroidery on the front floor mats, Arctic White seats wîth black-and-white houndstooth inserts (Arctic White leather optional) and five-color 30th Anniversary embroidery on the headrests.

Of course, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Camaro is not the only story for the 1997 model year. Camaro now features an enhanced interior, wîth a new instrument panel and seat contours. The center console features four cup holders (two for front passengers, two for rear passengers), a handy storage compartment, a coin holder and an auxiliary power outlet that accommodates accessories like portable cellular phones and car vacuums. The interior is available in two new colors, Dark Gray and Medium Gray, and the Convertible model now features front safety belt guide loops for added passenger safety and comfort. A redesigned family of radios completes the new 'inside story.'

The Camaro exterior boasts some new features for 1997 as well, including two new colors, Bright Green Metallic and Bright Purple Metallic (interim availability). New standard exterior features include worldwide tri-color taillamps for a European look, sporty 5-spoke aluminum wheels and low-profile windshield wipers that contribute to improved aerodynamics.

New safety features for 1997 include standard automatic Daytime Running Lamps (DRL) wîth automatic exterior lamp control. DRL makes Camaro more visible to other drivers in daylight hours or in inclement weather. Camaro Convertible meets 1997 Ú.S. federal dynamic side-impact requirements wîth the addition of energy-absorbing foam pads and wheelhouse bracings. Other safety features include driver and front- passenger air bags, safety-cage construction, and GM's award-winning ABS VI anti-lock brake system, all standard to provide occupant protection and help avoid collisions.

Únder the hood of Camaro is proven Chevrolet performance -- the 3800 V6 (Camaro and Camaro RS) and the 5.7 Liter V8 (Z28) engines, both wîth Sequential Fuel Injection. Transmissions for 1997 include a 5-speed manual wîth overdrive (not available on Z28), an optional 4-speed electronically controlled automatic wîth overdrive, and for those who want the most out of their Z28, the standard 4-speed automatic or the no-cost option 6-speed manual. In addition, a second gear start feature is included on all Camaros equipped wîth a V6 engine and an automatic transmission, for improved traction on slippery surfaces.

Camaro has an impressive list of maintenance-saving features, including platinum-tip spark plugs, designed to have their first scheduled maintenance at 100,000 miles*, and extended-life engine coolant, good for 5 years or 150,000 miles, whichever comes first*. There's also Dexron III automatic transmission fluid which, under normal operating conditions, never needs replacement. For added convenience, Camaro features standard battery-rundown protection, which automatically turns off the headlamps or interior lights if they are inadvertently left on.

Camaro Convertible is available in standard, RS and Z28 models. The convertible's rigid body structure provides a solid foundation that minimizes flexing, squeaks and rattles while providing precise handling and §teering. The power-operated top folds down flush, and a three-piece hard tonneau cover gives a finished appearance during top-down driving. The convertible top also features a full headliner, a glass rear window and a rear-window defogger as standard equipment.

All Camaro models share a rigid body structure that includes a full-unitized steel frame, steel reinforced composite body panels and front and rear bumpers, designed for rigidity and durability. Extensive anti-corrosion measures include the use of composites, two-side-galvanized steel and electrostatic primers.

Camaro is one of America's favorite muscle cars. Since debuting in 1967, it has come to embody the competitive spirit of Chevrolet wîth its unique synthesis of bold styling, compelling performance and incomparable value. This rich heritage, combined wîth three decades of racetrack success, has made Camaro a household name -- and one of the most recognizable cars on the road.

Source - Chevrolet

30TH ANNIVERSARY CAMARO Z28 SET TO PACE BRICKYARD 400

It's a familiar sight ... a massive pack of high-performance automobiles anxiously cruises the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, ready to make its move at the drop of the green flag. Out in front, a white 1997 30th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro Z28* keeps the vehicles in check.

Over the radio comes word for the Camaro driver to let the racers loose, and suddenly the racetrack is a combination of controlled chaos and raw power.

It's likely that the beginning of the Third Annual Brickyard 400 will look something like this for the third year, a Chevrolet leads the pack as the official pace vehicle.

'This is truly a proud moment for Chevrolet,' said John Middlebrook, general manager of Chevrolet and vice president of General Motors. 'There's no better way for the sporty Camaro to celebrate its 30-year heritage than on a racetrack in front of race fans.'

An impressive fifty Camaro Z28 pace cars supplied by Chevrolet will converge on Indianapolis on August 3. Two of the vehicles will be responsible for official pace car duties, while the rest will be used for support services.

To fully understand the significance of the Camaro pace car, one needs to look deeper under the teal, blue and gold Brickyard 400 graphics, the Z28 is a special edition 30th Anniversary Camaro. In fact, it's technically identical to the new 1997 Camaro. The laps it makes around the Indy Speedway will mark the first time a 1997 Camaro will be driven by the public.

To commemorate the 30th birthday of Camaro, Chevrolet will produce the vehicle in a special trim package for retail sale in the 1997 model year. The 30th Anniversary Camaro Z28** features an Arctic White Metallic exterior, including badging, grille, door handles and aluminum wheels. Two eye-catching centered 'hugger' orange stripes running the length of Camaro complete the exterior finish. Inside, white appointments and special houndstooth seats wîth the 30th Anniversary embroidery on the headrests and floor mats round out the 30th Anniversary package.

The 1997 30th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro Brickyard 400 Pace Car features:

• 5.7 Liter LT1 V8 engine wîth SFI rated at 285 horsepower at 5000 rpm, wîth 325 lb.-ft. of torque at 2400 rpm

• Four-speed electronically controlled 4L60-E transmission wîth computer-controlled fourth gear overdrive

• White cast alloy aluminum wheels, Goodyear Eagle GS-C P245/50ZR-16 steel-belted radial tires

• Four-wheel disc brakes wîth GMOs award-winning ABS VI anti- lock brake system

• Power rack-and-pinion §teering

• Light bar and strobed driving, brake and cornering lamps.

This Camaro Z28 pace car has some big shoes to fill. Chevrolets have served as the official Brickyard 400 pace vehicles in each year of the raceOs history. A Chevrolet Monte Carlo paced the first-ever Brickyard 400 race in 1994, followed by a full-size Chevy C/K Pickup in 1995.

In 1995, it appeared that, no matter where you looked, the red bowtie had left a major impression. Chevrolet won the SCCA Manufacturers Championship wîth Camaro, and Monte Carlo captured the Busch Grand National Drivers Championship and Winston Cup Drivers Championship. Finally, Dale EarnhardtOs win in Atlanta last season marked 300 NASCAR wins for Chevrolet in the modern era.

Source - Chevrolet
The fastest, most powerful anniversry model was the Camaro SS. All performance options carried over. The Hugger Orange stripes 'hugged' the hood scoop as it traveled over the car. The 17' SS specific wheels were lacquered in white just like the Z28. White leather or 'Houndstooth' cloth were the interior choices. 13 sec. 1/4 miles were extremely easy with the standard LT-1. Only 100 models were produced with the more powerful LT-4.

All 1997 Camaros had the 30th logo stitched into its seats, independent of which model it was. Only the white/orange anniversary package had the red,white,blue highlights.

Only a few hundred of these Brickyard 400 Pace Cars were built.
CHICAGO — Chevy Camaro represents 30 years of uncompromised American sports coupe performance. In fact, while other entries departed from their 'pony car' lineage over the years, Camaro has been a consistent force on the automotive scene, remaining true to its original image and mission. As a result, it's still unequaled today among its top competitors in 0–60 and quarter-mile acceleration, lateral g performance and slalom timing.

For 1998, the best gets better, as Chevrolet unveils the refined Camaro model lineup at the 1997 Chicago Auto Show. The '98 Camaro, which arrives in dealer showrooms this fall, is the next logical evolution in a proud performance legacy, sporting a more contemporary look, more V8 horsepower and torque, better fuel economy and a quieter ride. And, as a bonus, this Camaro meets 1999 federal emission standards ... one year early.

Here are some details on the latest generation of America's definitive performance car:

The 1998 Camaro comes in several models and body styles: The standard model, RS appearance package and Z28 are all available in either coupe or convertible versions. And now, the SS performance and appearance package is factory installed.
On the outside, Camaro's front end has an all-new hood, front fenders, front fascia, headlamps and windshield wiper system. The 1998 Camaro headlamps are composite and utilize reflector optics for better nighttime visibility. All models now feature body-colored door handles for a coordinated look. The Chevrolet bowtie logo is embossed on the underside of the hood blanket.

Exterior changes give the 1998 Camaro an aerodynamic front end. Said Werner Paulus, GM total vehicle integration engineer: 'The new exterior has evolved into a contemporary, pleasing, aerodynamic and nimble look. The styling changes give the car a softer, sleeker appearance.'

At the core of the Camaro is power ... the heart-thumping performance that sports car buyers demand. And the 1998 model delivers. A version of the 1997 Corvette's LS1 V8 powers the new Z28 and SS. In the Camaro Z28 and SS, the engine develops 305 hp at 5200 rpm, and 335 lb.-ft. of torque at 4000 rpm. This is an improvement over the 1997 Z28 of 25 hp and 10 lb.-ft. of torque. The standard model Camaro comes equipped wîth the 3800 V6, at 200 hp it's still one of the most powerful V6s in its class. The V8 is mated to a Borg Warner-designed T56 manual transmission manufactured by Tremec, and the V6 is coupled wîth a Borg Warner-designed T5 transmission, also made by Tremec.

Camaro's fuel economy is improved over 1997, as well. The 1998 model wîth V8 manual power achieves an estimated 18 mpg in the city and 27 mpg on the highway, versus 16/27 for the 1997. Equipped wîth an automatic transmission, ratings are estimated at 19 mpg city, 23 highway. (Economy ratings are adjusted, based on GM tests. EPA figures are not yet available.)

For '98, Camaro builds upon its road-hugging reputation. The suspension system has been tuned for better ride and handling, wîth revalved shocks in the front and rear, and increased spring rates.

The '98 Camaro SS features 17-inch Goodyear P275/40 ZR17 tires that provide improved performance feel and a smooth ride, while delivering better traction in snow. The spare tire is now 16 inches in diameter, up from 15 inches.
Four-wheel disc brakes are now standard across the lineup to provide more efficient brake cooling, resulting in more consistent stopping ability.
Antilock brakes are standard on all Camaro models (ABS is an option on the Ford Mustang). The Camaro ABS system is all-new, and is sourced from Bosch. It has fewer parts, weighs less and provides a shorter stopping distance than the old system.

The Camaro's new state-of-the-art optional traction control system (available on Z28 and SS) is reliable in all weather conditions and at all speeds. The traction control system functions through the use of brake pressure modulation, engine spark and throttle control.

The exhaust system includes an upgraded muffler — engineers added an aluminum coating to the muffler's cavity to improve corrosion protection and increase life. And both the V6 and V8 have larger mufflers for a more consistent, pleasing exhaust sound ... that still reminds drivers it's an American sports coupe.

The LS1 Engine

Now it's Camaro's turn. After debuting in the 1997 Corvette, the all-new LS1 V8 engine has been modified and made available for the 1998 Z28 and SS. Most of the changes to the engine were performed for packaging and operating efficiency. Yet, like the LS1 in the Corvette, the Camaro version features aluminum heads, rods, pistons, deep-skirt block, crank, oil pan and more. Bottom line ... the LS1 is built to perform ... and leave the competition behind.

Said John Juriga, LS1 project manager for GM Powertrain: 'The LS1 engine in the 1998 Camaro weighs about 10% less, fully dressed, than the LT1 engine it replaces. The result is an engine that's lighter, more powerful and quieter.'

Specific modifications for Camaro include:

• Engine accessory mountings have been relocated to provide better belt life, improved engine balance and reduced noise and vibration.

• Accessory drive (specific to Camaro).

• Air conditioning compressor (more rigidly mounted on lower right of engine).

• Dipstick and tube (right side of the block).

• Electronic oil level sensor (right side of the oil pan).

• Air-cleaner (forward of radiator).

• Air-cleaner base (upper radiator support).

• Alternator (positioned lower).

Power §teering pump (upper left side of engine).
• In addition, the air-cleaner element is more conveniently serviced via a slide-out cartridge design.

• The RS Appearance Package

For '98, the Camaro also offers an RS Appearance Package, available as an option on the standard coupe and convertible. It's designed for those who want a more distinct appearance for standard Camaro models. It includes:

• A front fascia extension for a sleeker look.

• Rocker panel moldings to carry that treatment along the bodysides.

• A rear fascia extension to round out the rear end.

• A spoiler unique to the RS package.

• Sporty aluminum wheels.


The SS Performance and Appearance Package
It's the ultimate Camaro driving experience ... and now, it can be served up direct from the manufacturer. After several years as an aftermarket option, the SS performance and appearance package is a new factory-installed option for 1998. The package can be ordered through Chevrolet dealerships. Here's a look at what the package contains:

• Planned horsepower increase — to be determined.

• Forced-air induction system.

• Hood design unique to the SS.

• Wide footprint, 17-inch Goodyear P275/40 ZR17 tires.

• Rear spoiler wîth light-emitting diode (LED) center high mount stop lamp.

• New 3-inch stainless steel exhaust tips.

• Power §teering cooler.

• Special high performance ride and handling package specific to the SS.

• SS badging/decals.


For Camaro SS drivers, life is defined by two key words ... 'move over.' In a few months, the next logical evolution of the classic Chevrolet performance car will arrive ... one that remains true to a proud 30 year lineage of sports coupe performance ... the 1998 Chevy Camaro.

Source - GM Corporation
The Chevrolet Camaro was introduced in 1967 as a compact car specifically built to provide competition for the highly popular Ford Mustang. This pony car was built atop of the same F-Body platform as the Pontiac Firebird, which had a similar production lifespan of 1967 through 2002.

During the preproduction stages of the Chevrolet Camaro, General Motors codenamed the vehicle 'Panther'. The name 'Camaro' was decided upon before production began. The word 'Camaro' in French is slang for 'friend' but in pony-car slang, the name means 'Mustang killer'.

During its production lifespan, there were four generations produced. The first generation lasted from 1967 through 1969. The second generation lasted from 1972 through 1981. The third generation lasted from 1982 through 1992. The fourth generation lasted from 1993 through 2002. The fifth generation is believed to begin production in 2007; a concept was shown at the 2006 Detroit Auto Show.

When the car was introduced in 1967, it was available in two bodystyles, a coupe and convertible. It shared many mechanics with the Chevrolet Nova and built atop a unibody chassis. The base engine was a 3.7 liter inline-six cylinder capable of producing 140 horsepower. Power was sent to the rear wheels courtesy of a Saginaw three-speed manual gearbox. A Muncie four-speed manual and a two-speed PowerGlide automatic were offered as optional equipment. Near the end of 1967, a Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 became available on the SS396. In 1969 the TH350 was offered on the Camaro as optional equipment, in place of the PowerGlide which was no longer offered. 14 inch wheels were standard.

To compete in the pony-car arena, General Motors offered a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine in 1967 that produced nearly 300 horsepower.

The Camaro was highly customizable, with over seventy factory and forty dealer options available. the z28 option was not mentioned in the sales literature so many buyers were unaware of its existence. Due to the lack of press about the Z28 option, only 602 examples were produced. The package included many performance enhancements such as a 4.9 liter small-block engine, front disc brakes, Muncie 4-speed gearbox, suspension improvements, 15 inch Rallye wheels, and power steering. The aesthetics of the vehicle were segregated from the other Camaro's with racing stripes being placed on the hood. The Z28 package was offered by GM specifically to comply with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans Am racing series that required an engine size of five-liters or less. Also, the vehicle must be sold to the general public.

The SS (Super Sport) package included many performance and aesthetic upgrades and was popular with more than 34400 examples created. Under the hood was a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine with a 6.5 liter big-block offered as optional equipment in 1968. On the grille, horn button, and gas cap were SS badging. Non-functional air-inlets adorned the front hood.

The RS (Rally Sport) package was basically a cosmetic upgrade. The headlights were hidden, the taillights received minor alterations, and the exterior rocker trim was revised. RS badging could be seen throughout the vehicle. This was the most popular option ordered in 1967 with over 64840 examples produced.

The RS and SS packages could be ordered together, creating the RS/SS Camaro. The combination included both the aesthetics of the RS and the performance of the SS. A Camaro RS/SS convertible with a 6.5 liter engine paced the Indianapolis 500 race in 1967.

With over 220900 examples produced in 1967, the Camaro proved to General Motors that the public was starved for small, performance, pony-cars.

In 1968 the Camaro received minor aesthetic and mechanical improvements. Side market lights were added, the grille became more pointed, and the taillights were now segregated. The side vent windows were removed. Performance was improved slightly by the staggering of the shock absorbers. On some of the models, the single-leafs were replaced by multi-leaf springs.

Buyers became aware of the Z28 package in 1968 and ordered nearly 72000 examples. The RS continued to be the most popular option with 40977 examples produced. The SS accounted for 27884 of the 235147 total Camaro's produced in 1968.

For 1969 the Camaro became safer and faster. General Motors mandated that the Camaro could not come from the factory with engines larger than 6.6 liters. To bypass this rule dealerships such as Yenko Chevrolet, Dana Chevrolet, and Nickey Chevrolet offered the Camaro with the 7 liter, big-block, L-27 corvette engine producing 425 horsepower. These performance options became so popular that in 1969 Chevrolet began offering two Central Office Production Orders (COPO) options, numbers 9560 and 9561. The COPO 9561 option included the L-72 Corvette engine. In total, there were 1015 Camaros equipped with the L-72 Corvette engine.

The COPO 9560 option included a 7-liter, big-block, ZL-1 engine. The engine was constructed of aluminum to help reduce the overall weight. The engine was reported to have produced around 430 gross horsepower but in reality it was closer to 550. With only 69 examples produced it is one of the rarest and fastest of all Chevrolet Camaros.

Most of the 1969 Chevrolet Camaro mechanics remained unchanged. The aesthetics was a different story. The grille was redesigned and the headlights now sat farther back adding to the aggressive features of the car. Newly reshaped door, rear quarter panel, and rear valence gave the 1969 Camaro a smooth, low, and wide stance. The production of the 1969 Camaro, which continued into December of 1969, was the final year for the first generation Camaro.

The second generation Camaro began production near the middle of 1970. The body had been redesigned and the suspension was greatly improved. The rest of the mechanics remained mostly unchanged from the prior years. The biggest change was the base engine, which was now a 4.1 liter inline-six capable of producing 155 horsepower. There was no convertible option offered, only a 2+2 coupe configuration.

The big-block eight-cylinder had been bored to 402 cubic-inches but still retained its 396 badging. The Rally Sport, Super Sport, and Z28 packages were still available. The Z28 now featured a 5.7 liter engine that produced 360 horsepower.

1972 was not a good year for the Camaro. For 174 days production ceased at GM's assembly plant in Ohio due to a UAW strike. This resulted in 1100 Camaro's failing to meet 1973 Federal bumper safety standards. In total, only 68,656 examples were production. Less than a thousand were the SS package so General Motors decided to no longer offer the package after 1972. This meant the big-block 396 cubic-inch engine was no longer offered.

The Camaro, much like the rest of the industry, had to adapt to new government and insurance safety and emission regulations. This meant new safety features like larger bumpers needed to be affixed to the car that could protect the vehicle and its occupants at certain speeds. Engines were detuned to comply with safety and emission concerns. The cars became safer but their performance was seriously crippled. This was true for the Camaro in 1973 when its highest producing engine was a 350 cubic-inch V-8 that produced 245 horsepower.

New for 1973 was an LT option which included impact-absorbing bumpers. The Camaro grew in size in 1974 due to a forward sloping grille and new aluminum bumpers. Rectangular bumpers replaced the round taillight designs. Sales of the Z28 package continued to decline so the decision was made to discontinue the option after 1974.

Horsepower was measured in NET rather than gross rating beginning in 1975. This meant that the reported horsepower was much lower than in prior years. The 350 cubic-inch V8 was now rated at about 155 horsepower.

In 1977 the Z28 was re-introduced in an effort to revitalize the muscle-car persona of the Camaro. The base Camaro's were outfitted with air-conditioning and an automatic transmission. A Borg-Warner Super T-10 four-speed manual gearbox could be ordered as optional equipment.

1978 marked the first year for the T-top option on a Camaro. The Camaro was given larger taillights and new bumpers.

As vehicles became safer, they became slower. The public shifted from wanting performance to luxury. Oil embargos and rising fuel costs had made the engines smaller but more fuel efficient. For 1979 the LT package was replaced with a luxurious Berlinetta that included special wheels, paint, emblems, and interior.

1979 was a very strong year for Camaro sales with 282,571 examples being sold.

1980 and 1981 saw very few changes. The hood scope on the Z-28 was revised to help siphon air to the engine.

In 1981 sales were down considerable to just over 126,000. This would be the final year for the second generation Camaro.

In 1982 General Motors introduced the third generation of the Camaro. The vehicle was stylish and versatile, earning the coveted Motor Trend magazine's Car of the Year. Both aesthetically and mechanically, the vehicle was improved. The suspension was upgraded making it more capable in the corners and at speed.

This was the first year the Camaro was equipped with a factory fuel-injected engine. A four-speed automatic gearbox replaced the three-speed unit. A five-speed manual gearbox was also available. Due to rising concerns of oil shortage, a four-cylinder engine was offered for part of 1982.

6000 examples of the Z28 Camaro were sold to commemorate the return of the pony-car to the Indianapolis 500. The special-edition vehicles were painted in two-tone silver and blue paint with orange pin-striping.

To honor the International Race of Champions, Chevrolet introduced the IROC-Z in 1985. The package included an improved suspension, decal package, and a 305 cubic-inch L98 Tuned Port Injection system borrowed from the Corvette. The IROC-Z was featured on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best List for 1985.

The L69 small-block engine was offered from 1983 through 1986. The LB9 small-block was introduced in 1985; the L98 small-block was introduced in 1987; the LO3 was introduced in 1988. The LB9, L98, and LO3 stayed in production until 1992.

1992 was the final year for the third generation Camaro. 1993 marked the beginning of the fourth generation which persisted until 2002.

New technology and material made the fourth generation greatly improved over the prior years. Weight was reduced with the use of plastic body panels sitting atop a steel space frame. Performance was increased thanks in part to a better suspension system. In 1993 Chevrolet offered the LT1 eight-cylinder engine, which had been in production for a year on the Corvette, on the Camaro. A six-speed manual gearbox was offered with the LT1 engine.

The Camaro returned to the Indianapolis 500 as the honorary pace car in 1993. To commemorate this historic accomplishment, Chevrolet offered a limited quantity of special edition Camaro's, painted in a black and white color scheme.

The design and mechanics remained mostly unchanged over the next few years. Minor revisions were made to comply with newly introduced emission standards. Mechanical changes were made to correct problems that had been found throughout the years.

In 1996 the RS package and the SS package were re-introduced. The RS was an appearance option for the six-cylinder Camaro's while the SS was both an appearance and performance package for the eight-cylinder cars.

1997 marked the 30th anniversary of the Camaro. A 30th Anniversary Package was offered to honor this accomplishment. The vehicles were painted white with orange stripes. 100 of the Anniversary Camaros were given the LT4 engine with 330 horsepower; a thirty-eight thousand dollar price tag accompanied the vehicle.

The interior of the Camaro was modernized in 1997 and again in 1998, although the 1998 improvements were minor in comparison to what transpired the prior year.

The body design was drastically changed in 1998, mainly in the front. Round headlights replaced the square design. The headlights were flush, inline with the rest of the body. A new grille and bumper were used, both positioned a little differently to mimic the headlight changes. A new powerful, lightweight, all-aluminum LS1 power-plant retired the LT1 unit. The OHV LS1 was borrowed from the Corvette and slightly detuned to produce just over 300 horsepower. To handle this extra power, the disc brakes were enlarged and the suspension was upgraded.

Total production for 1998 was 48490. This was disappointing for General Motors, especially with the newly revised body and powerful options. The lowest production year for the Camaro occurred in 2001 with just over 29000 examples being produced. This was due to low sales and production ceasing early to begin work on the 35th Anniversary 2002 cars.

2002 marked the final year for production of the fifth generation Camaro. The styling and mechanics were unmodified, carrying the same design from 1999.

A special 35th Anniversary Edition was offered and could be ordered on all trim levels and packages. The 35th Anniversary SS Camaro could only be ordered as a convertible or with T-Tops. Around 3000 examples of the 35th Anniversary Edition were created. Total production for the year was just over 42,000.

On August 27th, 2002 production ceased. The Camaro had accomplished its goal, to provide competition for the Ford Mustang and other compact, low-priced, sports cars. Outfitted with large, Corvette engines, matted to effective gearboxes and given great suspension and brakes, the Camaro was truly a performance machine that was capable and fun to drive. It was fairly practical with room for more than two passengers. It was economical with sticker-prices in the range that many could afford. The production of the Camaro has ceased, but its future has not yet been written. Expect to see this legendary vehicle on the roadways in the near future.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2006
The Chevrolet Camaro was introduced in 1967 as a compact car specifically built to provide competition for the highly popular Ford Mustang. This pony car was built atop of the same F-Body platform as the Pontiac Firebird, which had a similar production lifespan of 1967 through 2002.

During the preproduction stages of the Chevrolet Camaro, General Motors codenamed the vehicle 'Panther'. The name 'Camaro' was decided upon before production began. The word 'Camaro' in French is slang for 'friend' but in pony-car slang, the name means 'Mustang killer'.

During its production lifespan, there were four generations produced. The first generation lasted from 1967 through 1969. The second generation lasted from 1972 through 1981. The third generation lasted from 1982 through 1992. The fourth generation lasted from 1993 through 2002. The fifth generation is believed to begin production in 2007; a concept was shown at the 2006 Detroit Auto Show.

When the car was introduced in 1967, it was available in two bodystyles, a coupe and convertible. It shared many mechanics with the Chevrolet Nova and built atop a unibody chassis. The base engine was a 3.7 liter inline-six cylinder capable of producing 140 horsepower. Power was sent to the rear wheels courtesy of a Saginaw three-speed manual gearbox. A Muncie four-speed manual and a two-speed PowerGlide automatic were offered as optional equipment. Near the end of 1967, a Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 became available on the SS396. In 1969 the TH350 was offered on the Camaro as optional equipment, in place of the PowerGlide which was no longer offered. 14 inch wheels were standard.

To compete in the pony-car arena, General Motors offered a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine in 1967 that produced nearly 300 horsepower.

The Camaro was highly customizable, with over seventy factory and forty dealer options available. the z28 option was not mentioned in the sales literature so many buyers were unaware of its existence. Due to the lack of press about the Z28 option, only 602 examples were produced. The package included many performance enhancements such as a 4.9 liter small-block engine, front disc brakes, Muncie 4-speed gearbox, suspension improvements, 15 inch Rallye wheels, and power steering. The aesthetics of the vehicle were segregated from the other Camaro's with racing stripes being placed on the hood. The Z28 package was offered by GM specifically to comply with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans Am racing series that required an engine size of five-liters or less. Also, the vehicle must be sold to the general public.

The SS (Super Sport) package included many performance and aesthetic upgrades and was popular with more than 34400 examples created. Under the hood was a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine with a 6.5 liter big-block offered as optional equipment in 1968. On the grille, horn button, and gas cap were SS badging. Non-functional air-inlets adorned the front hood.

The RS (Rally Sport) package was basically a cosmetic upgrade. The headlights were hidden, the taillights received minor alterations, and the exterior rocker trim was revised. RS badging could be seen throughout the vehicle. This was the most popular option ordered in 1967 with over 64840 examples produced.

The RS and SS packages could be ordered together, creating the RS/SS Camaro. The combination included both the aesthetics of the RS and the performance of the SS. A Camaro RS/SS convertible with a 6.5 liter engine paced the Indianapolis 500 race in 1967.

With over 220900 examples produced in 1967, the Camaro proved to General Motors that the public was starved for small, performance, pony-cars.

In 1968 the Camaro received minor aesthetic and mechanical improvements. Side market lights were added, the grille became more pointed, and the taillights were now segregated. The side vent windows were removed. Performance was improved slightly by the staggering of the shock absorbers. On some of the models, the single-leafs were replaced by multi-leaf springs.

Buyers became aware of the Z28 package in 1968 and ordered nearly 7200 examples. The RS continued to be the most popular option with 40977 examples produced. The SS accounted for 27884 of the 235147 total Camaro's produced in 1968.

For 1969 the Camaro became safer and faster. General Motors mandated that the Camaro could not come from the factory with engines larger than 6.6 liters. To bypass this rule dealerships such as Yenko Chevrolet, Dana Chevrolet, and Nickey Chevrolet offered the Camaro with the 7 liter, big-block, L-27 corvette engine producing 425 horsepower. These performance options became so popular that in 1969 Chevrolet began offering two Central Office Production Orders (COPO) options, numbers 9560 and 9561. The COPO 9561 option included the L-72 Corvette engine. In total, there were 1015 Camaros equipped with the L-72 Corvette engine.

The COPO 9560 option included a 7-liter, big-block, ZL-1 engine. The engine was constructed of aluminum to help reduce the overall weight. The engine was reported to have produced around 430 gross horsepower but in reality it was closer to 550. With only 69 examples produced it is one of the rarest and fastest of all Chevrolet Camaros.

Most of the 1969 Chevrolet Camaro mechanics remained unchanged. The aesthetics was a different story. The grille was redesigned and the headlights now sat farther back adding to the aggressive features of the car. Newly reshaped door, rear quarter panel, and rear valence gave the 1969 Camaro a smooth, low, and wide stance. The production of the 1969 Camaro, which continued into December of 1969, was the final year for the first generation Camaro.

The second generation Camaro began production near the middle of 1970. The body had been redesigned and the suspension was greatly improved. The rest of the mechanics remained mostly unchanged from the prior years. The biggest change was the base engine, which was now a 4.1 liter inline-six capable of producing 155 horsepower. There was no convertible option offered, only a 2+2 coupe configuration.

The big-block eight-cylinder had been bored to 402 cubic-inches but still retained its 396 badging. The Rally Sport, Super Sport, and Z28 packages were still available. The Z28 now featured a 5.7 liter engine that produced 360 horsepower.

1972 was not a good year for the Camaro. For 174 days production ceased at GM's assembly plant in Ohio due to a UAW strike. This resulted in 1100 Camaro's failing to meet 1973 Federal bumper safety standards. In total, only 68,656 examples were production. Less than a thousand were the SS package so General Motors decided to no longer offer the package after 1972. This meant the big-block 396 cubic-inch engine was no longer offered.

The Camaro, much like the rest of the industry, had to adapt to new government and insurance safety and emission regulations. This meant new safety features like larger bumpers needed to be affixed to the car that could protect the vehicle and its occupants at certain speeds. Engines were detuned to comply with safety and emission concerns. The cars became safer but their performance was seriously crippled. This was true for the Camaro in 1973 when its highest producing engine was a 350 cubic-inch V-8 that produced 245 horsepower.

New for 1973 was an LT option which included impact-absorbing bumpers. The Camaro grew in size in 1974 due to a forward sloping grille and new aluminum bumpers. Rectangular bumpers replaced the round taillight designs. Sales of the Z28 package continued to decline so the decision was made to discontinue the option after 1974.

Horsepower was measured in NET rather than gross rating beginning in 1975. This meant that the reported horsepower was much lower than in prior years. The 350 cubic-inch V8 was now rated at about 155 horsepower.

In 1977 the Z28 was re-introduced in an effort to revitalize the muscle-car persona of the Camaro. The base Camaro's were outfitted with air-conditioning and an automatic transmission. A Borg-Warner Super T-10 four-speed manual gearbox could be ordered as optional equipment.

1978 marked the first year for the T-top option on a Camaro. The Camaro was given larger taillights and new bumpers.

As vehicles became safer, they became slower. The public shifted from wanting performance to luxury. Oil embargos and rising fuel costs had made the engines smaller but more fuel efficient. For 1979 the LT package was replaced with a luxurious Berlinetta that included special wheels, paint, emblems, and interior.

1979 was a very strong year for Camaro sales with 282,571 examples being sold.

1980 and 1981 saw very few changes. The hood scope on the Z-28 was revised to help siphon air to the engine.

In 1981 sales were down considerable to just over 126,000. This would be the final year for the second generation Camaro.

In 1982 General Motors introduced the third generation of the Camaro. The vehicle was stylish and versatile, earning the coveted Motor Trend magazine's Car of the Year. Both aesthetically and mechanically, the vehicle was improved. The suspension was upgraded making it more capable in the corners and at speed.

This was the first year the Camaro was equipped with a factory fuel-injected engine. A four-speed automatic gearbox replaced the three-speed unit. A five-speed manual gearbox was also available. Due to rising concerns of oil shortage, a four-cylinder engine was offered for part of 1982.

6000 examples of the Z28 Camaro were sold to commemorate the return of the pony-car to the Indianapolis 500. The special-edition vehicles were painted in two-tone silver and blue paint with orange pin-striping.

To honor the International Race of Champions, Chevrolet introduced the IROC-Z in 1985. The package included an improved suspension, decal package, and a 305 cubic-inch L98 Tuned Port Injection system borrowed from the Corvette. The IROC-Z was featured on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best List for 1985.

The L69 small-block engine was offered from 1983 through 1986. The LB9 small-block was introduced in 1985; the L98 small-block was introduced in 1987; the LO3 was introduced in 1988. The LB9, L98, and LO3 stayed in production until 1992.

1992 was the final year for the third generation Camaro. 1993 marked the beginning of the fourth generation which persisted until 2002.

New technology and material made the fourth generation greatly improved over the prior years. Weight was reduced with the use of plastic body panels sitting atop a steel space frame. Performance was increased thanks in part to a better suspension system. In 1993 Chevrolet offered the LT1 eight-cylinder engine, which had been in production for a year on the Corvette, on the Camaro. A six-speed manual gearbox was offered with the LT1 engine.

The Camaro returned to the Indianapolis 500 as the honorary pace car in 1993. To commemorate this historic accomplishment, Chevrolet offered a limited quantity of special edition Camaro's, painted in a black and white color scheme.

The design and mechanics remained mostly unchanged over the next few years. Minor revisions were made to comply with newly introduced emission standards. Mechanical changes were made to correct problems that had been found throughout the years.

In 1996 the RS package and the SS package were re-introduced. The RS was an appearance option for the six-cylinder Camaro's while the SS was both an appearance and performance package for the eight-cylinder cars.

1997 marked the 30th anniversary of the Camaro. A 30th Anniversary Package was offered to honor this accomplishment. The vehicles were painted white with orange stripes. 100 of the Anniversary Camaros were given the LT4 engine with 330 horsepower; a thirty-eight thousand dollar price tag accompanied the vehicle.

The interior of the Camaro was modernized in 1997 and again in 1998, although the 1998 improvements were minor in comparison to what transpired the prior year.

The body design was drastically changed in 1998, mainly in the front. Round headlights replaced the square design. The headlights were flush, inline with the rest of the body. A new grille and bumper were used, both positioned a little differently to mimic the headlight changes. A new powerful, lightweight, all-aluminum LS1 power-plant retired the LT1 unit. The OHV LS1 was borrowed from the Corvette and slightly detuned to produce just over 300 horsepower. To handle this extra power, the disc brakes were enlarged and the suspension was upgraded.

Total production for 1998 was 48490. This was disappointing for General Motors, especially with the newly revised body and powerful options. The lowest production year for the Camaro occurred in 2001 with just over 29000 examples being produced. This was due to low sales and production ceasing early to begin work on the 35th Anniversary 2002 cars.

2002 marked the final year for production of the fifth generation Camaro. The styling and mechanics were unmodified, carrying the same design from 1999.

A special 35th Anniversary Edition was offered and could be ordered on all trim levels and packages. The 35th Anniversary SS Camaro could only be ordered as a convertible or with T-Tops. Around 3000 examples of the 35th Anniversary Edition were created. Total production for the year was just over 42,000.

On August 27th, 2002 production ceased. The Camaro had accomplished its goal, to provide competition for the Ford Mustang and other compact, low-priced, sports cars. Outfitted with large, Corvette engines, matted to effective gearboxes and given great suspension and brakes, the Camaro was truly a performance machine that was capable and fun to drive. It was fairly practical with room for more than two passengers. It was economical with sticker-prices in the range that many could afford. The production of the Camaro has ceased, but its future has not yet been written. Expect to see this legendary vehicle on the roadways in the near future.

By Daniel Vaughan | May 2011
For more information and related vehicles, click here

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