1957 Lister Jaguar news, pictures, specifications, and information
Driver Brian Lister began producing sports racing cars during the mid-1950s, using MG and Bristol engines at first, and then experimenting with Jaguar and Chevrolet power. The Lister-Jaguars of 1957 had success racing against the highly competitive Jaguar D-Types and Aston Martins of the time. In total, there were 34 examples of the Lister-Jaguar constructed.
By Daniel Vaughan | Jun 2007
The Geo Lister Company was formed by George Lister in the late 1890s. Geo Lister formed a partnership with Charles Flatters and Harry Branch, creating a general engineering, blacksmith and wrought ironwork shop. When the partners retired and his sons Alfred and Horace joined the business, the company's name was changed to 'Geo. Lister & Sons' in 1919. In 1930, Horace became sole proprietor after the untimely death of his brother Alfred, and then their father.

Horace's sons Raymond and Brian later became directors in the company, ascending to joint Managing Directorship in 1954. Brian had an interest in racing and one of his first races was in a Morgan 4/4 sports. Later, he built a Cooper-MG sports car with help from Lister apprentice Edwin 'Dick' Barton. This was followed by the Tojeiro-JAP named the Asteroid.

Brian Lister met a one-handed individual named Archie Scott Brown who would later prove his abilities as a world-class racing driver. When the duo met Don Moore, a local motor engineer, the ingredients were formed for what would become a successful series of Lister sports-racing cars. During the 1950s , their cars would be a dominant force in the 'free-Formula' British sports car category and in Sports Car Club of America national Championship competition. The legendary 'Knobbly' Lister-Jaguars and Lister-Chevrolets are a few of the memorable names that raced during the 1958 and 1959 SCCA series.

A new company was formed by Brian Lister, dubbed 'Brian Lister (Light Engineering) Ltd' with the purpose of building racing cars. They utilized engines and various components from MG, Bristol, Chevrolet, Jaguar and Maserati vehicles during the 1950s. The most famous of their creations was the Knobbly. In total, there were no more than 17 original cars constructed in 1958. Following Scott Brown's fatal accident at Spa, Belgium, in May of 1958, Brian Lister closed his car manufacturing business.

In 1990, four special 'Centenary Edition' Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' cars were created to honor the centenary year of Geo. Lister & Sons Ltd. They were made to the same standard as the original. The final products were marketed by Lawrence Pearce in England.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2008
The Jaguar D-Type sports racer was a very dominate machine due to its excellent performance and handling characteristics. As such, there was a strong demand from Jaguar to continue to produce sports cars. In 1957 a fire at a factory and Jaguar's withdrawal from racing saw the production of the D-Type come to a close. As a result others stepped in to produce racers based on Jaguar components. One of the more successful of these creations was designed and built by Brian Lister. His first racers came on the scene in 1954 and often competed against stiff competition such as the Aston Martins and Jaguar D-Tpes. Archie Scott-Brown was one of the more memorable drivers who piloted the Lister built machines to many podium finishes and dominated the British racing car scene in 1957, winning 11 out of the 14 races. The 1957 Lister / Jaguar machine was constructed of a light-weight steel space frame chassis and bodied in an aluminum body. Its body was lump and thus it was given the nickname 'Knobbly'. Development continued throughout the years with a total of seventeen examples being created with most going to the United States. The first two examples were built for the legendary American sportsman, Briggs Cunningham. Seven examples were delivered to Jim Hall and Carrol Shelby who outfitted them with Chevrolet power-plants.

In 1959 the aerodynamics were changed and fitted with modified bodies designed by Frank Costin, an aeronautical engineer. The lines were smoothed out considerably, but the changes increased the frontal area and had an detrimental affect on the vehicles aerodynamics. As a result it had a lower top speed. In total, eleven examples were built with two being powered by Jaguar engines.
By Daniel Vaughan | Jun 2007
 
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Knobbly

1958 Costin Image Right1958 Knobbly Image Right
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