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1910 Lozier Model H news, pictures, specifications, and information

Sport Touring Briarcliff
 
The Lozier Company was founded in Plattsburgh, New York by Henry Abram Lozier. Lozier had made his fortune in the bicycle business and by 1901 began producing marine engines and steam launches. Their first automobiles were introduced later that year as prototypes, but production was halted because of other non-automotive business ventures until 1905 when Lozier exhibited their first vehicle at the New York Auto Show.

In 1907, Lozier hired the famous race driver Ralph Mulford to compete with one of their vehicles and this was the beginning of a very successful racing program which included victories in many of America's most prestigious races, including the Vanderbilt Cup and the Elgin Road Races. As the Lozier became more popular the company was seeking a larger production facility and a group of investors convinced Henry Lozier to relocate to Detroit in 1910.

For 1910, Lozier three models; the Model J which had a 116-inch wheelbase and was powered by a six-cylinder engine offering 33 horsepower. Three body styles were available including a touring, limousine, and a Briacliff. Next was the Model H and the Model I which both had a 124-inch platform. Four body styles included a limousine, touring, Briarcliff, and Lakewood. The difference between these two models was the engine. The Model H had a four-cylinder unit offering 45 horsepower while the Model I had a six-cylinder engine delivering 50 horsepower.

By 1911, Lozier was producing two models which were both built on the 131 inch chassis and powered by a 46 and 51 horsepower, six-cylinder T-head engines. The new investors forced Henry Lozier out of the company in 1912. Like many other small American companies, Lozier went out of business with the onset of World War I.
In the 1911 Indianapolis Race, it was a Lozier automobile that crossed the finish line in a very impressive second place. The Lozier Motor Company produced cars from 1905 through 1917. They were originally located in Plattsburgh, NY until 1910 when they moved to Detroit, Michigan. The cars they constructed were expensive, elegant, and favoried by the wealthy and discerning automoible buyer. In 1911 the price to own one of their vehicles ranged from $4600 to a staggering $7750.

1912 was their best year with 600 examples being produced.

By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2007
Just like many other individuals of the period, Henry Abram Lozier was first a bicycle manufacturer before moving to the production of automobiles. After building up a very successful bicycle company, he sold it for $4 million. With this new fortune, Lozier began experimenting with gasoline engines. By 1900 he had established the Lozier Motor Company at Plattsburgh, New York and was producing marine engines and launches. Two years later, the company was moving towards automobile engine production and performing experiments with steam and gasoline power. By 1905, the Lozier car was first introduced and offering horsepower in the 30 to 35 BHP range. The four-cylinder vehicle sold for $4,500, a sizeable sum in the early 1900s. A six-cylinder car was introduced in 1908. By 1913, six-cylinder engine, offered in two different sizes, were the only units powering Lozier vehicles.

Joseph M. Gilbert became the company's next president and was responsible for the introduction of the Type 84 in 1914. It was a four-cylinder model designed by British-born engineer John Perrin. It was positioned to compete with Cadillac's four-cylinder cars. The base price of the Type 84 was under $2,000 and its wheelbase measured 120-inches which was the same as Cadillac's. The engine was a departure from the prior Lozier engines. Instead of using a T-head design, the new unit was an L-head, cast en block. It had a displacement size similar to Cadillac's but produced more horsepower, at 56 bhp. It could out-perform the Cadillac while selling for about the same price.

Though the Type 84 and the Cadillac were comparable vehicles in 1914, the story was different for 1915. Cadillac introduced a 314 cubic-inch V8 that offered 70 horsepower and sold for just under $2,000. Lozier could not compete, and was struggling to stay in business. In August of 1914, the company was forced into bankruptcy. New ownership followed and in February of 1915, the production of sixes and the Type 84 was resumes, albeit in small quantities, until 1918.

Racing was another hallmark of the Lozier Company. The first company's victory was scored in 1907 by Ralph Mulford. Several important stages such as the Vanderbilt Cup and the inaugural Indy 500 were also contended by the Lozier Company. Lozier would achieve more victories in road races in 1910 and 1911 than any other single automaker.

By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2008
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