Concept Carz Home
 ConvertiblesArrow PictureManufacturersArrow PictureFiatArrow Picture1100 TV (1954 - 1958)Arrow Picture1958 Fiat 1100 TV 
 

1958 Fiat 1100 TV news, pictures, specifications, and information

Convertible
Chassis Num: 002039
 
Sold for $36,300 at 2008 RM Auctions.
The Fiat Company has very deep roots in the automotive industry, mostly in production, but some in racing. The legendary tuner, Abarth, helped increase the popularity and success of Fiat cars during the 1950s and 1960s, and achieve many victories around Europe.

The Fiat 500 and 600 were small, mass-produced cars and a big key to the company's prosperity during the 1950s and 1960s. The 1100 TV Fiat was a mild-deviation into the inexpensive sports car arena. Under the guidance of head designer, Giovanni Zoboli, Esparsa Comprenelli designed the 1100 TV (Turismo Veloce). Production began in the early 1950s and contiued through 1958. It was distinguishable by its split, recessed grille, roll-up windows, and wraparound windshield.

In 2008 this 1958 Fiat 1100 TV Cabriolet Voiture Especiale was brought to the Automobiles of Amelia Island presented by RM Auctions. It was offered without reserve and estimates to sell for $30,000 - $40,000. A high bid of $36,300 including buyer's premium was enough to secure new ownership.

This car has only two owners from new. In the early 2000s it was treated to a frame-up restoration that was completed in 2006. It is a low-mileage car that has been featured in numerous magazines. There is a Nardi wood steering wheel, whitewall tires, a new correct interior, faux turbine knock-off wheels, and swivel front seats. The car is painted in red with matching tan upholstery. The door panels and carpeting are finished in red trim. The Voiture Especiale designation is believed to be a reference to this particular trim package.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008
Convertible
 
This Fiat 1100TV Transformabile is believed to have been owned by the same owner for 45 years, before spending two years with a second owner. The current owner brought the car to Costa Rica from CA in 2005 and began a full show-quality restoration in 2006. The 2,500 hour restoration work was completed in October of 2009.
In 1937 Fiat introduced an updated version of their 508 Balilla, more commonly known as the 508C, with the 1100. The Fiat 1100 had a similar design to the Fiat 500 Topolino and the 1500. A four-cylinder 1089cc engine with overhead valves provided the power and powered the rear wheels through a four-speed gearbox.

The Fiat 1100B was introduced when the 1100 was treated to partial restyling around the front end. The 1100B was nicknamed the '1100 Musone', meaning big nose.

When the Second World War came to a close, the new iteration of the 1100 was soon introduced. It was given a curvy trunk and the name '1100E'.

The 1100 was treated to a redesign in 1953 resulting in a four-door sedan configuration with a monocoque bodywork and integrated front lights. This new model was dubbed the 1100/103 after its project number. This version was offered in two varieties, a 'economica' meaning cheaper and the 'normale' meaning the standard. A sporty version was later introduced, the 1100TV meaning Turismo Veloce in coupe configuration. A station-wagon version with a fifth door was later added.

In 1959 a special version known as the 1100 Granluce, meaning Large Light, was introduced. It had fin-tails and very wide windows. It could even be fitted with a new 1200 cc engine.

From 1956 through 1960 the 1100 was treated to slight aesthetic changes. It even sported small fin-tails with spear-shaped backlights for a period of time.

In 1962 Fiat introduced the third generation of the 1100 dubbed the 1100D. It was a four-door sedan similar to the Granluce but with toned-down styling and a simpler front end. This version continued in production until 1966 when the Fiat 124 was introduced. Prior to the introduction of the 124, Fiat introduced the 1100R, meaning Rinnovato. It was longer and had a square back and a front end similar to the Fiat 124. It remained in production until 1969 when it was succeeded by the Fiat 128.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008
Produced by the legendary Italian carmaker Fiat, the compact 1100 was produced from 1937 through 1969. The 1100 began its life as an updated version of the 508 'Balilla' and a dual identity as the 508C. With similar looks to the 1936 Fiat 500 'Topolino' and the bigger 1500, the 1100 featured the characteristic heart-shaped front grille and styling by up and coming designer Dante Giacosa.

Under the hood was a 1,089 cc four-cylinder overhead-valve engine and drive arrived at the rear wheels via a four-speed gearbox. The 1100 was praised for its comfortable ride, impressive performance for the time and exceptional handling. The 1100 underwent a substantial redesign that involved a revamped front end, new streamlined window-shaped louvres and a new name, the 1100B. The redesigned model also received the nickname '1100 musone' or 'big nose'. Once again the 1100 received a new moniker following WWII in 1949 when the car was redesigned with a curvy trunk and the name 1100E. Used mainly for vans and taxis, the 508C and 1100B were available as the long wheelbase 508L.

Entirely redesigned as a compact four-door sedan in 1953 the 1100 received its new name, 1100/103 after its project number. Along with modern monocoque bodywork, the 1100/103 featured integrated front lights and was available in two different versions; the 'economica' and 'normale'. The 'cheaper' and 'standard' models were joined with a sporty version in the fall of 1953, the 1100TV (Turismo Veloce). This sporty sibling featured a third light in the middle of the grille a bumped up 50 PS (37 kW) in place of the normal 36 PS (26 kW) of the regular models. Drivers could opt for the station-wagon version also with a side-hinged fifth door at the rear.

Debuting at the Geneva Motor Show in March of 1955 was the 1100/103 Trasformabile. A two-seater roadster, the Trasformabile took its design from America and was created by the special bodies division of Fiat (Sezione Carrozzerie Speciali). A total of 571 of these first series were produced and were equipped with the mechanics from the 1100TV. A more robust engine was introduced in 1956 with an additional three more horsepower and an updated rear suspension. 450 more of these updated models were built. The following year the model came with an even more powerful 55 PS (40 kW) '1200' engine with 1,221 cc. Until 1959 production continued with a total of 2,360 of the 1.2-liter Trasformabiles constructed. The biggest difference with the 1.2 was larger headlights and slight modifications to the front and rear design.

Various updates occurred between 1956 and 1960 that included a newly designed grille, dual color dressing, a newly designed grille and small fintails with spear-shaped backlights. Introduced in 1959 was the 1100 Granluce ('Large light'), a special version without the rear-hinged doors featured both fintails and wider windows. One could outfit the Granluce with a new powerful 1,221 cc engine. From 1955 through 1958 the Fiat 1100/103 was also assembled by Premier Automobiles Limited (PAL) in India at its Kurla, Bombay plant. Millecento was the designation of the older model, and the Elegant featured the center light on its front grille. The fintail model debuted as the Millecento in 1958, closely followed by the Select, and then four years later the Super Select arrived in 1962.

The third generation of the 1100 was introduced in 1962, the 1100 D (Delight). Comfortable and plain, the four-door sedan shared many similarities with the Granluce but featured a new simpler rectangular front end and more basic sides. During the early sixties the 1100D was a popular Italian standard. The 1100D had its own Estate or Family car version and a Deluxe model that featured a healthy high performance of 50 PS (37 kW), front bench seat with two reclining back, carpet floor mats and additional side moldings. Until 1966 these vehicles continued on without any major updates. It wasn't until the arrival of the revolutionary 124 that the 1100 had to step it up style-wise.

Premier Automobiles Limited manufactured the Fiat 1100D under license in India in 1964. Originally the car was marketed as the Fiat 1100D, as the Premier President for 1972, and the Premier Padmini from 1974 until 2000 when it was discontinued. A diesel version with a 1366 cc diesel engine was badged as the Premier Padmini 137D in 1993. This version was produced in collaboration with FNM from Italy. Premier Automobiles manufacturing plant closed down in 2000.

The final 1100 model was the 1967 Fiat 1100R (Rinnovata). Featuring similar front styling as the Fiat 124, the 1100R arrived on the scene longer and sleeker with a squared back. The vestigial fins were designed much more hidden than before and the vertical form rear light cluster from the 1100D was replaced with the simple round ones from the Fiat 850. To avoid an overlap with the 124 the 1100R was only available with the senior 1,089 cc engine. With an output of 48 bhp (36 kW) the engine had a compression ratio of 8:1. Though the clutch and gearbox remained the basically the same, a floor mounted gear lever returned and was situated between the front seats and connected to the gearbox with a rod linkage system. Fiat enthusiasts praised this update. Between the differential and the gearbox the propeller shaft was now separated into two parts and three couplings.

Another thankful change for the 1100R was the expanded trunk due to the car's overall lengthening. The fuel tank was placed in the right rear wing and the spare wheel was now found under the floor. For an additional £8 in the UK, reclining front seats could be an option. In 1969 the new middle-class Fiat 128 replaced the 1100R.

In 1957 the 1100T was available as a pickup, van and bus. Powered by an in-line engine with 1,089 cc (type 103 D.007) with 38 PS (28 kW) at 4800 rpm, the 1100T had a top speed of 56 mph. The Fiat 1100 T2 replaced this vehicle in 1959 and featured a boost of power with a 45 PS (33 kW) 1,222 cc engine). Production of this range continued on smoothly until 1971 when the production of the 1100 T4 ceased.

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat_1100

By Jessica Donaldson

Arrow Right 1958 Fiat models
Fiat 1200 TV
Fiat 500
Fiat 600 Jolly
Fiat 600 Multipla
Fiat Jolly 500
Fiat Viotti Sport

Collectible: A Gathering of the Exceptional and Captivating
Similar Automakers
Alfa RomeoCitroen
LanciaMorgan
OpelPeugeot
RenaultSeat
SkodaVauxhall
Similarly Sized Vehicles from 1958
Fiat 1200 TV
Fiat 600 Multipla
MG MGA
Nash Metropolitan
Triumph TR3A
Victoria 250

Similarly Priced Vehicles from 1958
Chevrolet Bel Air Series ($2,400-$2,900)
Dodge Coronet ($2,410-$2,905)
Plymouth Belvedere ($2,350-$3,035)
AMC Rambler Six ($2,050-$2,620)
Fiat 1200 TV ($2,500-$2,500)

Average Auction Sale: $36,300

 
Fiat: 1951-1960
Similar Automakers
Fiat History
Other models by Fiat
Manufacturer Website

Fiat
Monthly Sales FiguresVolume
October 20143,725 
September 20143,360 
August 20143,362 
July 20143,807 
June 20144,478 
May 20144,771 
April 20144,298 
March 20144,738 
February 20143,465 
January 20143,222 
December 20133,745 
November 20133,075 
(More Details)

 
1100
1200
124
128
131
1500GT
2300
500
508
600
60HP
850
8V
Abarth 750
Balilla
Barchetta
Bravo
Cinquecento
Croma
Dino
Freemont
Panda
Punto
Ritmo
Strada
Tipo 6
Topolino
Type 56
Ulysse
Uno
X 1/9

© 1998-2014. All rights reserved. The material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.