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1949 Ford Custom Series news, pictures, specifications, and information
1949 was a big year for the Ford Motor Company as they introduced their first new product line since the end of World War II. Ford offered two Series for 1949, a base and a Custom Series. Both were offered with either a six- or eight-cylinder engine. The base series was the base trim level while the Custom was the top trim level. Additions to the Custom series were additional chrome moldings, a horn ring, interior B pillars, and two sun visors. The Deluxe Series could also be purchased in convertible or station wagon bodystyles - in addition to the two- and four-door sedans, and club coupe. The base series had two- and four-door sedan, a club coupe and a business coupe.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2008
Chassis Num: 98BA350442
 
Sold for $18,700 at 2009 RM Auctions.
The styling for the 1949 Ford Custom was all-new and primarily the work of George Walker, a graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Art. Assisting Walker was Richard Caleal, Robert Bourke and Bob Koto. The designs featured slab-sided bodies earning the cars the nickname 'shoe box Ford.'

The cars were available with either a six- or eight-cylinder engine. In the front was a spinner-style grille and a large central spinner ornament. Ford engineers gave the cars an updated chassis and suspension with longitudinal mounted springs.

There were 51,133 convertibles produced in 1949 on the Ford Custom line with the base price selling at $1,885.

In 2009, this car was offered for sale at the Vintage Motor Cars of Hershey presented by RM Auctions where it was estimated to sell for $15,000 - $25,000 and offered without reserve. The lot was sold for the sum of $18,700, including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2009
Convertible
 
For 1949, the Fords were built on a 114-inch wheelbase and given a ladder frame supporting a front coil spring suspension with longitudinal semi-elliptical springs in the rear. To increase passenger legroom the engine was moved forward. The antiquated torque tube was replaced by a modern drive shaft. Power was still from either a 226 cubic-inch flathead six-cylinder or a flathead V8 displacing 239 cubic-inches. The 6-cylinder engine offered 90 horsepower while the V8 version boosted power to 100.
By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2010
Station Wagon
Chassis Num: 98BA-694803
 
Sold for $49,500 at 2013 RM Auctions.
Ford had their 1949 models in production and ready for the public by June 948, beating Chevrolet by six months and Plymouth by nine months. Ford was America's number on auto manufacturer, with a production increase of over 300 percent from 1948 and an extended 16-month selling period.

The 1949 models were nicknamed 'shoebox' fords due to their new slab-sided bodies with flush-mounted fenders. They were the most modern looking of the Big Three low-priced cars for 1949. In total, 31,412 were the new Ford wagon. It featured an all-steel structure that nearly stopped the typical squeaking and much of the wind noise associated with a wood-bodied car. The design featured bolt-on, replaceable wood panels. Up to this point in history, all Ford wagons used solid maple framing, but the 1949's framing was steel-covered, with paneling that was created by using the latest in electronic technology. The parts were created by using a microwave bonding process that squeezed a mixture of phenolic resin-coated wood pieces together to form a frame blank. The panels were crafted by a layer of maple over an inner layer of ash. The roof was also made from steel. Ford offered the wagon in its highly-priced Custom series, but only as a two-door from 1949 to 1951.

This example is painted Midland Maroon Metallic over a dark tan interior. The car was restored in Oklahoma approximately 15 years ago and has been in its current owner's collection for the last six years. Power is from a 226 cubic-inch overhead valve 'flathead' V-8 engine offering 100 horsepower. There is a three-speed manual transmission and four-wheel drum brakes.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2013
Station Wagon
Chassis Num: 98BA333878
 
Sold for $37,000 at 2014 Mecum.
This 1949 Ford Woody Wagon is one of the last Ford's from the late Floyd Moore Private Museum Collection. It was given a restoration in the early 1990s by the second owner on a well preserved 'barn find' specimen. It has been meticulously maintained and lightly used since 1993 by the Moore family in northern Wisconsin, not far from the Iron Mountain, Michigan hardwood forest where Ford grew their own trees for use on their woodies.

The car is powered by a Flathead V8 engine and fitted with a three-speed transmission with overdrive. It has the correct Midland Maroon Metallic paint and original woodwork. Inside, there is a dark brown interior and 3 rows of seating. There are rubber floor mats and correct linoleum in the rear storage area. It has a rare rotating center headlight, spare tire cover, whitewall tires, radio, heater and clock.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2014
World War II put automobile production on hold. Production ceased on February 10, 1942 and resumed in 1946. When production began, most vehicles offered by marques were basically carried over from pre-War development. It was not until 1949 until Ford began offering new designs. They featured simple lines that were clean and well integrated into the body. In the front was a dramatic and artful bullet nosed grille.

The Custom Deluxe Series was introduced in 1950 and would continue for a total of two years. The Custom Deluxe Crestliner two-door sedan was Ford's top-of-the-line offering and included chrome window moldings, chrome horn rings, armrests on all doors, and two sun visors. Needless to say, there was chrome at nearly every available location. Two engines were available, a six- and eight-cylinder unit. The L-head six-cylinder unit produced 95 horsepower while the L-head V8 produced 100 horsepower. The standard gearbox was a three-speed manual; an optional three-speed manual with automatic overdrive was optional

The cars rested on a 114-inch wheelbase and passenger cars measured 196.6 inches. Station wagons were slightly larger, measuring 206 inches.

The Crestliner was a two-door special sedan that had a vinyl top covering. There was extra chrome, special steering wheel, full wheel covers and special paint.

By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2009
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