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1911 Cadillac Model 30 news, pictures, specifications, and information

Demi-Tonneau
 
The 1911 Cadillac Model 30 was powered by a 286 cubic-inch four-cylinder engine offering 40 horsepower. It had a three-speed sliding transmission and rode on a 116-inch wheelbase. The wheels measured 26-inches with 34x4.5-inch tires. Standard equipment included a top, speedometer, carbide generator, Gray & Davis Head, side and tail lamps custom made for Cadillac.

The 1911 Cadillac came with two independent ignition systems; a Delco system with battery, coil and distributor, and a Bosch magneto.
Demi-Tonneau
Chassis Num: 50361
 
Sold for $99,000 at 2005 RM Auctions.
Sold for $79,200 at 2010 RM Auctions.
Demand for Cadillac's had risen by 1910, so much so that the company was pre-selling all seven models, and in 1911, production reached a new record of 10,019 cars. 1911 would be the final year for the Demi-Tonneau, which allowed quick conversion from a four-seat touring car to a stylish two-seat runabout. It was priced at $1,700, which was identical to that of the Roadster and the standard Touring car. Standard equipment on the Model 30 included hand-buffed leather upholstery, a Delco ignition and a Bosch magneto, gas headlamps and a gas generator, a pair of side oil lamps, a tail lamp, a horn, a tool set and a tire repair kit. 1911 would be the last year any Cadillac would be fitted with gas headlamps and oil lamps.

Cadillac increased is standard L-head four-cylinder engine to 286.3 cubic-inches for 1911, resulting in a power increase from 28.9 to 32.4 A.L.A.M. horsepower. This example has been restored before it was acquired by the current owner in 2005. It is finished in a blue body, black fenders and a light grey chassis, running gear and wheels. There are a black button-tufted leather seats and a black canvas top. There is a full set of Gray and Davis side lamps, headlamps and a tail lamp. Other equipment includes a New Haven clock, a 70-mph Cadillac speedometer, a folding windshield and all-white tires.

In 2010, this Demi-Tonneau was offered for sale at the Vintage Motor Cars of Meadow Brook where it was estimated to sell for $80,000 - $100,000. As bidding came to a close, the car was sold for the sum of $79,200 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2010
Touring
Chassis Num: 58609
Engine Num: 31319
 
This 1911 Cadillac Model 30 4-door with Southern Tread, features an additional four-inch width to accommodate the wagon ruts on southern roads.

The car was sold new to a doctor in Columbia, SC. The current owner's father became the 4th owner of this vehicle after the 3rd owner restored it in the late 1950s and sold it in 1963.

The toured with the car until 1981, when it started having engine problems. It stayed parked until June 2010 when the current owner started restoring it. Restoration was completed in October 2011.
Touring
 
The 1911 Cadillac Model 30 was the first model Cadillac that offered front doors to protect the drivers and front seat passengers from road dirt and debris. It sold new for about $1,750, which was more than double the price of a new Model T Ford, but still considered to be a mid-priced vehicle for the period.
Touring
Chassis Num: 53029
 
This 1911 Cadillac Model 30 Touring Car was originally purchased by a salesman for the Morrow Packing Company. It was delivered to the Cadillac Auto Company of Cincinnati, Ohio in November of 1910. It has been stored in multiple barns since 1922 until its restoration which began in 2002.
By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2011
Touring
 
The Cadillac company was formed from the remnants of the Henry Ford Company after Henry Ford departed. Henry M. Leland of Leland & Faulconer Manufacturing Company was influential in persuading the remaining partners to continue the automobile business with Leland's 1-cylinder engine.

The company was renamed the Cadillac Automobile Company on August 22nd of 1902. The biggest selling point for the company was their precision manufacturing and reliability based on winning the British Dewar Trophy for the most important advancement of the year in the automobile industry. In 1909, Cadillac was acquired by General Motors.

The Model 30 was introduced in December of 1909 and sold through 1914. This was the only Cadillac model offered during that period and was based on the earlier 1907 Model G. In 1910, it became the first automobile offered with a closed body.
The Cadillac Model 30 was introduced in 1908 and remained in production until September of 1914. When first introduced, the Model Thirty sold for $1400 and available as a three-passenger Roadster, 2-door Demi-Tonneau with seating for four, or a two-door, five passenger Tourer.

The wheelbase was 106-inches and powered by a 226.2 cubic-inch engine with five main bearings. There were three forward gears with a selective sliding transmission and a reverse gear. Mechanical brakes were on the rear wheels.

In 1910, the cost of the Model 30 increased to $1600. Additional body styles were added to the lineup, including a limousine and coupe.

For 1911, the cost continued to increase, now reaching a base of $1700. A Torpedo and four-door Touring body style was added.

In 1912, the base price increased another $100 and by 1913 the price was just under $2000.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2007
Cadillac's first vehicles were single-cylinder vehicles that offered reasonable power and durability. The single-cylinder engine would stay in production for six years. The third year of Cadillac production, a four-cylinder engine was introduced offering slightly more horsepower allowing for larger and heavier bodies to be fitted on the chassis. In 1905 the Model D featured seating for five and powered by a massive 300 cubic-inch four-cylinder engine attached to a wheelbase that measured 100-inches. Only 156 examples were produced this year of the Model D, and accounted for only a small percentage of Cadillac's annual production, reaching around 4000 units. Nevertheless, the large and powerful engines in Cadillac's arsenal would continue to foster, growing into a sixteen-cylinder unit by the early 1930s.

In 1906 Cadillac offered two models with four-cylinder engines, the Model L and the Model H. The engines displaced 393 cubic-inches and provided ample amounts of power and torque. The following year, Cadillac introduced the Model G, which was a simpler version of the Model L and H. It had a 226.2 cubic-inch four-cylinder engine which produced 20 horsepower and rested on a wheelbase that was the same size as the Model D, and two inches shorter than the Model H. The Model H sold for $2400 to $3600 while the Model G, in all three bodystyles, sold for $2000.

For 1908, production of the Model G reached 1,030 units which accounted for 40-percent of Cadillac's annual total.

For 1909, Cadillac offered only one model, the Model 30, named for its 30 horsepower engien. It was a refined version of the Model G that rested on a longer wheelbase and offered only in open body styles. Its price tag was around two-thirds that of the price of the Model G. The public approved, buying nearly six times as many cars as Cadillac's annual production total in 1908.

The Model 30 was offered in three bodystyles consisting of a demi-tonneau, a tourer, and a roadster. The demi-tonneau had a detachable tonneau which could be converted to a runabout, greatly adding to the appeal and versatility of the vehicle. A windshield was optional equipment; when ordered it was attached to a wood dashboard fitted over the cowl. Closed bodystyles returned in 1910 in the form of a coupe and limousine.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2007
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