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 ManufacturersArrow PictureAMCArrow PictureJavelin (1968 - 1974)Arrow Picture1974 AMC Javelin 
Image Left 1973 Javelin
 

1974 AMC Javelin news, pictures, specifications, and information

FastBack Coupe (V-8)
 
American Motors, one of the oldest automobile companies in the U.S., was formed in 1954 through the merger of Nash Motors and Hudson Motor Car Company, and in 1987 was acquired by Chrysler.

American Motors produced the Javelin model from 1968 through 1974. The base price for this car was $3,299, and the car displayed here was purchased for $4,350. The AMX originally began as a separate model but was incorporated as an option for the Javelin starting with the 1971 model year.

American Motors achieved record sales in 1972 by focusing on quality and including an innovative 'Buyer Protection Plan' to back its products. This was the first time an automaker promised to repair anything wrong with the car (except for tires) for one year or 12,000 miles.

The Javelin was considered a 'Pony Car' with competition coming from the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro and Pontiac Firebird. Total production for the Javelin as 22,566 with 4,980 being AMX's in 1974.

The current owner purchased this car new at Grosse Pointe AMC in February of 1974. It currently has 37,700 original miles, all original body panels and interior.
AMX FastBack Coupe
 
This car was built in August of 1974 with a late VIN number and body sequence number, also factory equipped without the AMX fiberglass cowl induction hood, making it one of the last Javelin AMX's built.

The AMC Javelin is famous for winning the Trans-Am Championship in 1971 and 1972, dominating the pony car competition, driven by legendary racecar driver Mark Donohue and George Follmer.

This car has 70,000 original non-restored miles, performance AMX package, performance 'Go' package, AMC 360 4-barrel V8 engine, shift-command auto transmission, 3.54 Twin-Grip 20 rear axle, heavy-duty cooling package, rally-pack instruments, suspension handling package, quick ratio power steering, disc brakes in front, insulation group, protection group, lighting group, and original rally floor mats.
The AMC Javelin was produced from 1968 through 1974 intended as a 'pony' car for the American Motors Corporation. To fit into a wide variety of budgets, AMC offered the Javelin with a variety of engines that included the 232 six-cylinder variant all the way up to the might eight-cylinder power-plants. The 343 cubic-inch four-barrel V8 was a serious performance machine offering, with 280 horsepower and 365 foot-pounds of torque. Optional disc brakes and wide tires helped the driver keep the vehicle in control.

AMC had introduced the Marlin in 1965, right after the introduction of the Ford Mustang. The Mustang easily outsold the Marlin partly due to the Marlins large 112-inch wheelbase. There was seating for six with plenty of trunk space. The thing it lacked was the sporty image that the Mustang had capitalized upon.

AMC's chief designer Richard A. Teague quickly revised the design resulting in the AMX concept cars of the late 1960's. Pressured by upper management and those with financial interests in AMC, the Javelin production car was sent to market. It borrowed heavily from the AMX concept's design and was considered by many to be sporty and attractive. Its design was uncluttered and smooth with its split front grille and semi-fastback roofline. The interior featured front bucket seats and rear bench.

The six-cylinder engine offered 145 horsepower and adequate fuel economy. The 'Go' package, opted by many buyers, featured front disc brakes, tuned suspension with anti-sway bar, upgraded tires, and a choice of three potent V8 engines.

In 1969 a 390 cubic-inch engine became available. Its impressive 315 horsepower and 425 foot-pounds of torque could send the Javelin from zero-to-sixty in the seven-second range.

The standard suspension was comprised of coil springs and unequal-length wishbones in the front and semi-elliptic leaf springs and sold axle in the rear. The optional fast-ratio steering and handling package greatly improved the handling during aggressive driving.

In 1971 the Javelin was restyled and now included a roof spoiler, fender bulges, and arched fenders. The interior was given a stripe pattern.

During its introductory year, 55000 examples were produced. The AMC Company was not known as a company that could produce a performance machine. The Javelin, along with the help of Mark Donohue and Roger Penske, set a new reputation for the AMC Company on the Trans Am racing circuit. In nine races the duo scored seven wins and captured the Trans Am Series Championship. The Javelin repeated its success in the following two years.

The demise of the muscle-car era was mostly caused by an increase in government and safety regulations and fuel concerns. Javelin's sales creped along during the early 1970's but by 1974 production ceased.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jul 2006
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