Concept Carz Home
 CoupesArrow PictureManufacturersArrow PictureStudebakerArrow PictureGolden Hawk (1956 - 1958)Arrow Picture1956 Studebaker Golden Hawk 
1957 Golden Hawk Image Right
 

1956 Studebaker Golden Hawk news, pictures, specifications, and information

Hardtop
 
These Studebaker's were styled by the industrial designer, Raymond Loewy and were considered trend-setters in their day. This vehicle has been restored in its tri-level Studebaker original colors of Mocha-Doeskin, one of the most popular colors for the Golden Hawk. The automobile was shipped new to Franklin, In. In 1972 a poll of stylists representing the Big Three Automakers voted Raymond Loewy's design of the Studebaker Starliner Coupe the predecessor of the Golden Hawk an 'industry best'. Mr. Loewy was also named one of the most influential Americans by 'Life' magazine.

This car received a full restoration that was completed in the year 2002.
Hardtop
 
Raymond Loewy designed the body of the Studebaker Golden Hawk and power was from a 352 cubic-inch Packard V8 engine offering 275 horsepower. The 1956 models were the first examples created after the merger of Studebaker and Packard. The Golden Hawks came with a $3,987 price tag and there were 4071 examples produced.

This Studebaker Golden Hawk was built in South Bend, Indiana and shipped via rail to Hamilton, Montana. The current owner of this 2-Door Hardtop purchased this numbers matching car in 1999 and treated it to a complete restoration in 2007. It was originally sold in Montana where it enjoyed a salt and rust-free life.

Among the significant technical improvements were Safety-Fin brake drums (for extra bake cooling); self-tightening wheel bolts; padded dash and padding on the rear of the front seat; and a 'hill holder,' which prevent rolling back on hills. The car also featured a tachometer and vacuum gauges as well as a 12-volt electrical system and 30 amp generator.

By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2011
Hardtop
Chassis Num: 6031833
 
Sold for $30,250 at 2012 Russo & Steele.
Sold for $33,000 at 2013 Barrett-Jackson.
This 1956 Golden Hawk is the only model to use the powerful Packard 352/275 HP V8 engine with 380-ft/lb of torque. This car is restored example that has a powder coated frame with custom leather interior. The paint and glass are in show quality. The first car with fiberglass fins, Studebaker styling with Packard power and was known as one of the first American muscle cars.
The Studebaker Golden Hawk was produced from 1956 through 1958. The styling was influenced by Raymond Loewy's design studio who used the shape of the Champion and Commander of the early 1950's as its beginning point. The Golden Hawk had an eggcrate grille and a pointed front end nose. In the rear were tailfins with integrated tail lights. The brake light and backup-light were stacked in the rear. The rear window was wrap-around. There were a variety of colors to select from, including the popular two-tone color schemes.

Under the hood was a Packard 352 cubic-inch V8 engine rated at 275 horsepower. With its low body weight and powerful engine, the Golden Hawk could race from zero-to-sixty in around 7.8 seconds and reach top speed at 125 mph. A McCulloch supercharger was later added which raised horsepower to 275. A fiberglass overlay on the hood was added which provided extra room for the supercharger.

In 1956 there were four Hawk models to select from, the Golden Hawk, Flight Hawk Coupe, Power Hawk Coup, and the Sky Hawk hardtop.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2006
A two-door pillarless hardtop coupe type vehicle, the Studebaker Golden Hawk was produced in South Bend, Indiana from 1956 through 1958. This was the final Studebaker until the introduction of the Avanti that had its styling influenced by industrial designer Raymond Loewy's studio. The Golden Hawk featured the basic shape of the 1953-55 Champion/Commander Starliner hardtop coupe but featured a large, nearly vertical eggcrate grille and raised hoodline rather than the previous vehicles swooping, pointed nose. The rear of the vehicle featured a raised, squared-off trunklid instead of the earlier sloped lid and new vertical fiberglass tailfins were added to the rear quarters.

To give room for a larger engine, the raised hood and grille were added to allow for Packard's large 352 in³ (5.8 L) V8 which delivered 275 bhp (205 kW). Because the Golden Hawk was so light, this big, heavy engine gave the vehicle an amazing power-to-weight ratio for the time period. The Golden Hawk was second only to the Chrysler 300 B in 1956 American car production, and the pricy Chrysler was a road-legal NASCAR racing car. Much like the Chryslers, the Golden Hawk could be considered a precursor to the muscle cars of the 1960s.

The Golden Hawk with its heavy engine came with a bad reputation for poor handling and being nose heavy. Many of the road tests were done by racing drivers, and found that the Golden Hawk could out-perform the Ford Thunderbird, Chevy Corvette and the Ford Thunderbird in both 0-60 mph acceleration and quarter mile times. The fastest reported time in magazine testing was 7.8 seconds while top speeds were quoted at 125 mph.

A large variety of colors that included two-tone were available for this year. Initially two-tone schemes involved the front upper body, while the roof and a panel on the tail were painted the contrasting color while the rest of the body was the base color. For 1956 the upper body above the tail-line, including trunk were painted the contrast color with the tail panel in 1956 while the roof and body below the belt line trim were painted the base color.

To keep the prices down, an increased options list and reduced standard equipment were used in comparison to the earlier year's Studebaker President Speedster which was replaced by the Golden Hawk. Turn signals were even an option, technically. In 1956 the Golden Hawk was matched with three other Hawk models and was the only Hawk not technically considered a sub-model within one of Studebaker's regular passenger car lines. The Flight Hawk coupe was a Champion, the Sky Hawk hardtop was a President and the Power Hawk coupe was a Commander.

For 1957 and 1958 the Golden Hawk continued on with minor changes. Eventually sold to Curtiss-Wright, Packard's Utica, Michigan engine plant was leased during 1956 and marked the end of genuine Packard production. For two more years, Packard-badged vehicles were produced, though they were basically dolled-up Studebakers.

The Packard V8 was no longer available and was replaced by the Studebaker 289 in³ (4.7 L) V-8. A McCulloch supercharger was also added to the lineup and gave the same 275 horsepower 205 kW) output as the Packard engine. The cars maximum speed was improved and now the best-performing Hawks (before the Gran Turismo Hawk) was improved and was now available with the Avanti's R2 supercharged engine for the 1963 model year.

For the 1957 model year, the Golden Hawk featured some updated styling. A new fiberglass overlay was added to the vehicle and now covered a hole in the hood that was needed to clear the supercharger, which was placed high on the front of the engine. The tailfins were now made of metal and were concave and swept out from the sides of the vehicle. Normally painted a contrasting color, the fins were outlined in chrome trim, though some solid-color models were built.

A luxury 400 model was unveiled halfway through the 1957 model year. It featured a fully upholstered trunk, unique trim and a leather interior. Only 41 models were ever produced and today only a few models are still believed to be in existence.

The Golden Hawk received 14-inch (356 mm) wheels in place of the 15-inch (381 mm)
And due to this the car now rode slightly lower. The 15 inch wheels were still available as an option though. A new, round Hawk medallion was mounted in the lower center of the grille and new contrasting-color paint was available as an option in both the roof and tailfin application.

For 1958 a few minor engineering updates were made for the Golden Hawk that included revisions to the suspension and driveshaft that now allowed designers to create a three-passenger rear seat. Previous models had only featured seating for two passengers in the rear due to the high driveshaft 'hump' that necessitated dividing the seat. A fixed arm rest was also placed between the rear passengers in earlier models, and was later made removable due to customer requests.

Unfortunately in the late 1950's, sales were drastically hit much like many of the expensive vehicle. The model was discontinued after only 878 models were ever sold in 1958. The only Hawk model was the Silver Hawk and was renamed simply the Studebaker Hawk for the 1960 model year.

By Jessica Donaldson
For more information and related vehicles, click here

KIA MOTORS AMERICA ELECTRIFIES LAS VEGAS WITH MUSIC-DRIVEN SOULS AT SEMA
Inspired by the Eclectic World of Contemporary Music, Kia Partners with RIDES Magazine and Popular Mechanics to Open the Show in Amplified Fashion ◾Five 2014 Souls debut with live mobile performances, featuring a cutting-edge DJ station and a pro-sound-quality, plug-in-ready amplifier on wheels ◾NBC's The Voice and Vans Warped Tour are represented with their own themed Soul urban hatchbacks ◾A rolling music museum Soul pays homage to the art form with memorabilia spanning multiple genr...[Read more...]
NEW YORK PROCLAIMS 'HAIL YES!' AS FIRST NISSAN NV200 TAXICAB HITS THE STREETS OF MANHATTAN
NEW YORK – A new era in public transportation has begun with the Nissan NV200T taxicab now in service on the streets of New York City. The meter on the first NV200T fare officially kicked-off at JFK International Airport on October 23, dropping its inaugural passenger near 13th Street and 6th Avenue in Manhattan. Mr. Ranjit Singh, an owner/operator of Medallion No. 7F20, took delivery of his NV200T from Koeppel Nissan in Queens on October 18. Eight Nissan dealerships in the New York Ci...[Read more...]
Shelby Performance Parts Introduces Wide Body Kits For 2005-2009 Mustang
Shelby Performance Parts (SPP), a division of Shelby American, a wholly owned subsidiary of Carroll Shelby International Inc. (CSBI.PK), is now offering the highly sought-after Shelby Wide Body Kit for 2005-2009 Mustang and Shelby models. The Shelby Wide Body package was unveiled on the 2013 Shelby GT500 Super Snake at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit this January, and is now available through SPP, giving customers the option to buy the kit and have it installed by a local s...[Read more...]
Norra Names Mark Mcmillin Grand Marshal For 2013 General Tire Mexican 1000
Legendary Baja racing champion and San Diego-based homebuilder Mark McMillin has been named by the National Off Road Racing Association (NORRA) as the honorary Grand Marshal for this year's upcoming General Tire NORRA Mexican 1000. The unique fourth annual on and off-road rally is set to kick off this Saturday, April 27th in Mexicali, Baja, Mexico and will conclude at lands-end in San Jose Del Cabo on May 1. Mark McMillin's Grand Marshal role places him in an elite group of previous icons ...[Read more...]
Eleanor of 'Gone In 60 seconds' Will Cross The Block At Mecum's Indy Auction
The Opportunity to Own the Original Movie Hero Car is this May 18 in Indianapolis A true movie star will make its way down Mecum's signature red carpet this May in Indianapolis. Known by most simply as 'Eleanor,' the modified 1967 Ford Mustang from Touchstone Pictures' 'Gone in 60 Seconds' will cross the block as Lot S135 at Dana Mecum's 26th Original Spring Classic auction this May 14-19. This collector car icon piloted in the movie by retired master car thief Memphis Raines, playe...[Read more...]
Avanti
Champion
Commander
Coupe Express
Daytona
Dictator
Hawk
Lark
President
Six

1957 Golden Hawk Image Right
© 1998-2014. All rights reserved. The material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.