Concept Carz Home
 ConvertiblesArrow PictureManufacturersArrow PictureChevroletArrow PictureCamaro (1993 - 2002)Arrow Picture1996 Chevrolet Camaro 
Image Left 1995 Camaro1997 Camaro Image Right
 

Image credits: © Chevrolet. GM Corp

1996 Chevrolet Camaro news, pictures, specifications, and information

WARREN, MI -- Bold and brawny, blessed wîth compelling performance and endowed wîth state-of-the-art safety features, Camaro adds yet another attribute to its long list of virtues for 1996: the new RS. Available in Coupe or Convertible, RS boasts lower front and rear fascia extensions, aggressive 'ground-effects' rocker panel moldings and an exclusive three-part spoiler.
Affordable performance is also news for 1996. A 3800 SFI V6 -- standard in Camaro Coupe and Convertible -- delivers 200 horsepower. With a 40-horsepower advantage over last year's standard 3.4 Liter V6 engine, the spirited 3800 V6 provides the kind of performance that will have Camaro drivers wondering whether there are two more cylinders under the hood.

Specify the new Performance Handling Package option on base coupe and convertible and you've got a potent combination that's still easy on the pocketbook. The Performance Handling Package requires P235/55R-16 tires on 16' aluminum wheels and includes limited slip differential, 4-wheel disc brakes, dual-outlet exhaust system and sport §teering ratio (14.4:1 ratio).

The revered 5.7 Liter LT1 V8 -- standard in Z28 Coupe and Z28 Convertible -- hasn't been overlooked in the performance department, either. The amazing small block V8 is rated at 285 horsepower. The legendary Z28 is outfitted wîth a standard 6-speed manual transmission, a specially tuned suspension, quick §teering and four-wheel anti-lock disc brakes.

Both the 3800 V6 and 5.7 Liter V8 are equipped wîth sophisticated new OBD II (On-Board Diagnostics Second Generation). This advanced system constantly monitors the emissions system and alerts the driver about a potential malfunction.

All the news isn't under the hood, however. Camaro has a new optional vehicle and content theft-alarm system wîth a motion sensor and door jamb switch sensors to help keep intruders at bay.

Camaro has a long list of standard safety features that includes driver and front-passenger air bags, safety-cage construction and GM's award-winning ABS VI anti-lock brake system. Camaro Coupes meet the '97 Federal standards for side-impact protection by incorporating steel side-door beams and energy-absorbing foam pads.

Standard equipment also includes a Tilt-Wheel Adjustable Steering Column, PASS-Key II theft-deterrent system, intermittent wipers, AM/FM stereo wîth four speakers and cassette tape player, covered visor mirrors, side-window defoggers, door storage pockets and a center console wîth lighted storage compartment.

New chrome-plated 16' aluminum wheels (optional on all models) give Camaro a distinctive appearance. Other optional equipment includes air conditioning (optional on base coupe, standard on other models), power door locks, a full complement of premium audio systems, Remote Keyless Entry, power windows, power exterior mirrors and T-Tops.

Camaro Convertible is available in base and Z28 models. The convertible's rigid body structure provides a solid foundation that minimizes flexing, squeaks and rattles while providing precise handling and §teering. The power-operated top folds down flush, and a three-piece hard tonneau cover gives a finished appearance during top-down driving. The convertible top also features a full headliner and a rear-window defogger as standard equipment.

All Camaro models share a body structure that includes a full-unitized steel frame, steel reinforced composite body panels and honeycombed front and rear bumpers. Extensive anti-corrosion measures include the use of composites, two-side-galvanized steel and electrostatic primers. Sleek and sophisticated, Camaro is the quintessential Chevrolet. Since its introduction in 1967, this muscular sports car has embodied all the hallmarks of 'Genuine Chevrolet,' winning legions of fans wîth its unique combination of bold styling, compelling performance and incomparable value. This rich heritage, combined wîth innumerable racetrack successes, has made Camaro a household name -- and one of the most recognizable cars on the road.

Source - GM Corporation

The 1996 Camaro lineup features six models:


Camaro Coupe: base coupe
Camaro RS Coupe and RS Convertible
Camaro Convertible: base convertible
Camaro Z28 Coupe: uplevel coupe
Camaro Z28 Convertible: uplevel convertible.
Camaro Special Service Package (SEO B4C). Police fleets can order a Special Service Package on the 1996 Camaro. First introduced on the 1991 Camaro RS, this package has become popular for highway and interstate traffic control. The B4C police package includes:


5.7 Liter LTI V8
6-speed manual or 4-speed electronically controlled automatic transmission
Single exhaust and converter wîth dual tailpipes
Performance suspension
16' aluminum wheels
P245/50ZR-16 speed-rated blackwall tires
4-wheel vented anti-lock disc brakes
3.23:1 limited slip rear axle (automatic transmission)
3.42:1 limited slip rear axle (manual transmission)
Transmission oil cooler (automatic transmission only)
140-amp alternator
525-CCA battery
Air conditioning
150-mph speedometer.

Source - GM Corporation

What's New For 1996

Interior

New interior trim cloth
New theft-alarm system option
New front safety belt buckles for child seats
New interior color: Neutral (cloth and leather).

Exterior

New paint color (Cayenne Red Metallic)
New optional chromed-aluminum wheel
New RS Package.

Performance

3800 V6 base engine
New V6 Performance Handling Package
New OBD II (On-Board Diagnostics Second Generation)
New driver-selected 2nd-gear start for V6 w/ auto
New long-life coolant good for 5 years/100,000 miles* 285 HP LTI.

Source - Chevrolet
The Chevrolet Camaro was introduced in 1967 as a compact car specifically built to provide competition for the highly popular Ford Mustang. This pony car was built atop of the same F-Body platform as the Pontiac Firebird, which had a similar production lifespan of 1967 through 2002.

During the preproduction stages of the Chevrolet Camaro, General Motors codenamed the vehicle 'Panther'. The name 'Camaro' was decided upon before production began. The word 'Camaro' in French is slang for 'friend' but in pony-car slang, the name means 'Mustang killer'.

During its production lifespan, there were four generations produced. The first generation lasted from 1967 through 1969. The second generation lasted from 1972 through 1981. The third generation lasted from 1982 through 1992. The fourth generation lasted from 1993 through 2002. The fifth generation is believed to begin production in 2007; a concept was shown at the 2006 Detroit Auto Show.

When the car was introduced in 1967, it was available in two bodystyles, a coupe and convertible. It shared many mechanics with the Chevrolet Nova and built atop a unibody chassis. The base engine was a 3.7 liter inline-six cylinder capable of producing 140 horsepower. Power was sent to the rear wheels courtesy of a Saginaw three-speed manual gearbox. A Muncie four-speed manual and a two-speed PowerGlide automatic were offered as optional equipment. Near the end of 1967, a Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 became available on the SS396. In 1969 the TH350 was offered on the Camaro as optional equipment, in place of the PowerGlide which was no longer offered. 14 inch wheels were standard.

To compete in the pony-car arena, General Motors offered a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine in 1967 that produced nearly 300 horsepower.

The Camaro was highly customizable, with over seventy factory and forty dealer options available. the z28 option was not mentioned in the sales literature so many buyers were unaware of its existence. Due to the lack of press about the Z28 option, only 602 examples were produced. The package included many performance enhancements such as a 4.9 liter small-block engine, front disc brakes, Muncie 4-speed gearbox, suspension improvements, 15 inch Rallye wheels, and power steering. The aesthetics of the vehicle were segregated from the other Camaro's with racing stripes being placed on the hood. The Z28 package was offered by GM specifically to comply with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans Am racing series that required an engine size of five-liters or less. Also, the vehicle must be sold to the general public.

The SS (Super Sport) package included many performance and aesthetic upgrades and was popular with more than 34400 examples created. Under the hood was a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine with a 6.5 liter big-block offered as optional equipment in 1968. On the grille, horn button, and gas cap were SS badging. Non-functional air-inlets adorned the front hood.

The RS (Rally Sport) package was basically a cosmetic upgrade. The headlights were hidden, the taillights received minor alterations, and the exterior rocker trim was revised. RS badging could be seen throughout the vehicle. This was the most popular option ordered in 1967 with over 64840 examples produced.

The RS and SS packages could be ordered together, creating the RS/SS Camaro. The combination included both the aesthetics of the RS and the performance of the SS. A Camaro RS/SS convertible with a 6.5 liter engine paced the Indianapolis 500 race in 1967.

With over 220900 examples produced in 1967, the Camaro proved to General Motors that the public was starved for small, performance, pony-cars.

In 1968 the Camaro received minor aesthetic and mechanical improvements. Side market lights were added, the grille became more pointed, and the taillights were now segregated. The side vent windows were removed. Performance was improved slightly by the staggering of the shock absorbers. On some of the models, the single-leafs were replaced by multi-leaf springs.

Buyers became aware of the Z28 package in 1968 and ordered nearly 72000 examples. The RS continued to be the most popular option with 40977 examples produced. The SS accounted for 27884 of the 235147 total Camaro's produced in 1968.

For 1969 the Camaro became safer and faster. General Motors mandated that the Camaro could not come from the factory with engines larger than 6.6 liters. To bypass this rule dealerships such as Yenko Chevrolet, Dana Chevrolet, and Nickey Chevrolet offered the Camaro with the 7 liter, big-block, L-27 corvette engine producing 425 horsepower. These performance options became so popular that in 1969 Chevrolet began offering two Central Office Production Orders (COPO) options, numbers 9560 and 9561. The COPO 9561 option included the L-72 Corvette engine. In total, there were 1015 Camaros equipped with the L-72 Corvette engine.

The COPO 9560 option included a 7-liter, big-block, ZL-1 engine. The engine was constructed of aluminum to help reduce the overall weight. The engine was reported to have produced around 430 gross horsepower but in reality it was closer to 550. With only 69 examples produced it is one of the rarest and fastest of all Chevrolet Camaros.

Most of the 1969 Chevrolet Camaro mechanics remained unchanged. The aesthetics was a different story. The grille was redesigned and the headlights now sat farther back adding to the aggressive features of the car. Newly reshaped door, rear quarter panel, and rear valence gave the 1969 Camaro a smooth, low, and wide stance. The production of the 1969 Camaro, which continued into December of 1969, was the final year for the first generation Camaro.

The second generation Camaro began production near the middle of 1970. The body had been redesigned and the suspension was greatly improved. The rest of the mechanics remained mostly unchanged from the prior years. The biggest change was the base engine, which was now a 4.1 liter inline-six capable of producing 155 horsepower. There was no convertible option offered, only a 2+2 coupe configuration.

The big-block eight-cylinder had been bored to 402 cubic-inches but still retained its 396 badging. The Rally Sport, Super Sport, and Z28 packages were still available. The Z28 now featured a 5.7 liter engine that produced 360 horsepower.

1972 was not a good year for the Camaro. For 174 days production ceased at GM's assembly plant in Ohio due to a UAW strike. This resulted in 1100 Camaro's failing to meet 1973 Federal bumper safety standards. In total, only 68,656 examples were production. Less than a thousand were the SS package so General Motors decided to no longer offer the package after 1972. This meant the big-block 396 cubic-inch engine was no longer offered.

The Camaro, much like the rest of the industry, had to adapt to new government and insurance safety and emission regulations. This meant new safety features like larger bumpers needed to be affixed to the car that could protect the vehicle and its occupants at certain speeds. Engines were detuned to comply with safety and emission concerns. The cars became safer but their performance was seriously crippled. This was true for the Camaro in 1973 when its highest producing engine was a 350 cubic-inch V-8 that produced 245 horsepower.

New for 1973 was an LT option which included impact-absorbing bumpers. The Camaro grew in size in 1974 due to a forward sloping grille and new aluminum bumpers. Rectangular bumpers replaced the round taillight designs. Sales of the Z28 package continued to decline so the decision was made to discontinue the option after 1974.

Horsepower was measured in NET rather than gross rating beginning in 1975. This meant that the reported horsepower was much lower than in prior years. The 350 cubic-inch V8 was now rated at about 155 horsepower.

In 1977 the Z28 was re-introduced in an effort to revitalize the muscle-car persona of the Camaro. The base Camaro's were outfitted with air-conditioning and an automatic transmission. A Borg-Warner Super T-10 four-speed manual gearbox could be ordered as optional equipment.

1978 marked the first year for the T-top option on a Camaro. The Camaro was given larger taillights and new bumpers.

As vehicles became safer, they became slower. The public shifted from wanting performance to luxury. Oil embargos and rising fuel costs had made the engines smaller but more fuel efficient. For 1979 the LT package was replaced with a luxurious Berlinetta that included special wheels, paint, emblems, and interior.

1979 was a very strong year for Camaro sales with 282,571 examples being sold.

1980 and 1981 saw very few changes. The hood scope on the Z-28 was revised to help siphon air to the engine.

In 1981 sales were down considerable to just over 126,000. This would be the final year for the second generation Camaro.

In 1982 General Motors introduced the third generation of the Camaro. The vehicle was stylish and versatile, earning the coveted Motor Trend magazine's Car of the Year. Both aesthetically and mechanically, the vehicle was improved. The suspension was upgraded making it more capable in the corners and at speed.

This was the first year the Camaro was equipped with a factory fuel-injected engine. A four-speed automatic gearbox replaced the three-speed unit. A five-speed manual gearbox was also available. Due to rising concerns of oil shortage, a four-cylinder engine was offered for part of 1982.

6000 examples of the Z28 Camaro were sold to commemorate the return of the pony-car to the Indianapolis 500. The special-edition vehicles were painted in two-tone silver and blue paint with orange pin-striping.

To honor the International Race of Champions, Chevrolet introduced the IROC-Z in 1985. The package included an improved suspension, decal package, and a 305 cubic-inch L98 Tuned Port Injection system borrowed from the Corvette. The IROC-Z was featured on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best List for 1985.

The L69 small-block engine was offered from 1983 through 1986. The LB9 small-block was introduced in 1985; the L98 small-block was introduced in 1987; the LO3 was introduced in 1988. The LB9, L98, and LO3 stayed in production until 1992.

1992 was the final year for the third generation Camaro. 1993 marked the beginning of the fourth generation which persisted until 2002.

New technology and material made the fourth generation greatly improved over the prior years. Weight was reduced with the use of plastic body panels sitting atop a steel space frame. Performance was increased thanks in part to a better suspension system. In 1993 Chevrolet offered the LT1 eight-cylinder engine, which had been in production for a year on the Corvette, on the Camaro. A six-speed manual gearbox was offered with the LT1 engine.

The Camaro returned to the Indianapolis 500 as the honorary pace car in 1993. To commemorate this historic accomplishment, Chevrolet offered a limited quantity of special edition Camaro's, painted in a black and white color scheme.

The design and mechanics remained mostly unchanged over the next few years. Minor revisions were made to comply with newly introduced emission standards. Mechanical changes were made to correct problems that had been found throughout the years.

In 1996 the RS package and the SS package were re-introduced. The RS was an appearance option for the six-cylinder Camaro's while the SS was both an appearance and performance package for the eight-cylinder cars.

1997 marked the 30th anniversary of the Camaro. A 30th Anniversary Package was offered to honor this accomplishment. The vehicles were painted white with orange stripes. 100 of the Anniversary Camaros were given the LT4 engine with 330 horsepower; a thirty-eight thousand dollar price tag accompanied the vehicle.

The interior of the Camaro was modernized in 1997 and again in 1998, although the 1998 improvements were minor in comparison to what transpired the prior year.

The body design was drastically changed in 1998, mainly in the front. Round headlights replaced the square design. The headlights were flush, inline with the rest of the body. A new grille and bumper were used, both positioned a little differently to mimic the headlight changes. A new powerful, lightweight, all-aluminum LS1 power-plant retired the LT1 unit. The OHV LS1 was borrowed from the Corvette and slightly detuned to produce just over 300 horsepower. To handle this extra power, the disc brakes were enlarged and the suspension was upgraded.

Total production for 1998 was 48490. This was disappointing for General Motors, especially with the newly revised body and powerful options. The lowest production year for the Camaro occurred in 2001 with just over 29000 examples being produced. This was due to low sales and production ceasing early to begin work on the 35th Anniversary 2002 cars.

2002 marked the final year for production of the fifth generation Camaro. The styling and mechanics were unmodified, carrying the same design from 1999.

A special 35th Anniversary Edition was offered and could be ordered on all trim levels and packages. The 35th Anniversary SS Camaro could only be ordered as a convertible or with T-Tops. Around 3000 examples of the 35th Anniversary Edition were created. Total production for the year was just over 42,000.

On August 27th, 2002 production ceased. The Camaro had accomplished its goal, to provide competition for the Ford Mustang and other compact, low-priced, sports cars. Outfitted with large, Corvette engines, matted to effective gearboxes and given great suspension and brakes, the Camaro was truly a performance machine that was capable and fun to drive. It was fairly practical with room for more than two passengers. It was economical with sticker-prices in the range that many could afford. The production of the Camaro has ceased, but its future has not yet been written. Expect to see this legendary vehicle on the roadways in the near future.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2006
The Chevrolet Camaro was introduced in 1967 as a compact car specifically built to provide competition for the highly popular Ford Mustang. This pony car was built atop of the same F-Body platform as the Pontiac Firebird, which had a similar production lifespan of 1967 through 2002.

During the preproduction stages of the Chevrolet Camaro, General Motors codenamed the vehicle 'Panther'. The name 'Camaro' was decided upon before production began. The word 'Camaro' in French is slang for 'friend' but in pony-car slang, the name means 'Mustang killer'.

During its production lifespan, there were four generations produced. The first generation lasted from 1967 through 1969. The second generation lasted from 1972 through 1981. The third generation lasted from 1982 through 1992. The fourth generation lasted from 1993 through 2002. The fifth generation is believed to begin production in 2007; a concept was shown at the 2006 Detroit Auto Show.

When the car was introduced in 1967, it was available in two bodystyles, a coupe and convertible. It shared many mechanics with the Chevrolet Nova and built atop a unibody chassis. The base engine was a 3.7 liter inline-six cylinder capable of producing 140 horsepower. Power was sent to the rear wheels courtesy of a Saginaw three-speed manual gearbox. A Muncie four-speed manual and a two-speed PowerGlide automatic were offered as optional equipment. Near the end of 1967, a Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 became available on the SS396. In 1969 the TH350 was offered on the Camaro as optional equipment, in place of the PowerGlide which was no longer offered. 14 inch wheels were standard.

To compete in the pony-car arena, General Motors offered a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine in 1967 that produced nearly 300 horsepower.

The Camaro was highly customizable, with over seventy factory and forty dealer options available. the z28 option was not mentioned in the sales literature so many buyers were unaware of its existence. Due to the lack of press about the Z28 option, only 602 examples were produced. The package included many performance enhancements such as a 4.9 liter small-block engine, front disc brakes, Muncie 4-speed gearbox, suspension improvements, 15 inch Rallye wheels, and power steering. The aesthetics of the vehicle were segregated from the other Camaro's with racing stripes being placed on the hood. The Z28 package was offered by GM specifically to comply with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans Am racing series that required an engine size of five-liters or less. Also, the vehicle must be sold to the general public.

The SS (Super Sport) package included many performance and aesthetic upgrades and was popular with more than 34400 examples created. Under the hood was a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine with a 6.5 liter big-block offered as optional equipment in 1968. On the grille, horn button, and gas cap were SS badging. Non-functional air-inlets adorned the front hood.

The RS (Rally Sport) package was basically a cosmetic upgrade. The headlights were hidden, the taillights received minor alterations, and the exterior rocker trim was revised. RS badging could be seen throughout the vehicle. This was the most popular option ordered in 1967 with over 64840 examples produced.

The RS and SS packages could be ordered together, creating the RS/SS Camaro. The combination included both the aesthetics of the RS and the performance of the SS. A Camaro RS/SS convertible with a 6.5 liter engine paced the Indianapolis 500 race in 1967.

With over 220900 examples produced in 1967, the Camaro proved to General Motors that the public was starved for small, performance, pony-cars.

In 1968 the Camaro received minor aesthetic and mechanical improvements. Side market lights were added, the grille became more pointed, and the taillights were now segregated. The side vent windows were removed. Performance was improved slightly by the staggering of the shock absorbers. On some of the models, the single-leafs were replaced by multi-leaf springs.

Buyers became aware of the Z28 package in 1968 and ordered nearly 7200 examples. The RS continued to be the most popular option with 40977 examples produced. The SS accounted for 27884 of the 235147 total Camaro's produced in 1968.

For 1969 the Camaro became safer and faster. General Motors mandated that the Camaro could not come from the factory with engines larger than 6.6 liters. To bypass this rule dealerships such as Yenko Chevrolet, Dana Chevrolet, and Nickey Chevrolet offered the Camaro with the 7 liter, big-block, L-27 corvette engine producing 425 horsepower. These performance options became so popular that in 1969 Chevrolet began offering two Central Office Production Orders (COPO) options, numbers 9560 and 9561. The COPO 9561 option included the L-72 Corvette engine. In total, there were 1015 Camaros equipped with the L-72 Corvette engine.

The COPO 9560 option included a 7-liter, big-block, ZL-1 engine. The engine was constructed of aluminum to help reduce the overall weight. The engine was reported to have produced around 430 gross horsepower but in reality it was closer to 550. With only 69 examples produced it is one of the rarest and fastest of all Chevrolet Camaros.

Most of the 1969 Chevrolet Camaro mechanics remained unchanged. The aesthetics was a different story. The grille was redesigned and the headlights now sat farther back adding to the aggressive features of the car. Newly reshaped door, rear quarter panel, and rear valence gave the 1969 Camaro a smooth, low, and wide stance. The production of the 1969 Camaro, which continued into December of 1969, was the final year for the first generation Camaro.

The second generation Camaro began production near the middle of 1970. The body had been redesigned and the suspension was greatly improved. The rest of the mechanics remained mostly unchanged from the prior years. The biggest change was the base engine, which was now a 4.1 liter inline-six capable of producing 155 horsepower. There was no convertible option offered, only a 2+2 coupe configuration.

The big-block eight-cylinder had been bored to 402 cubic-inches but still retained its 396 badging. The Rally Sport, Super Sport, and Z28 packages were still available. The Z28 now featured a 5.7 liter engine that produced 360 horsepower.

1972 was not a good year for the Camaro. For 174 days production ceased at GM's assembly plant in Ohio due to a UAW strike. This resulted in 1100 Camaro's failing to meet 1973 Federal bumper safety standards. In total, only 68,656 examples were production. Less than a thousand were the SS package so General Motors decided to no longer offer the package after 1972. This meant the big-block 396 cubic-inch engine was no longer offered.

The Camaro, much like the rest of the industry, had to adapt to new government and insurance safety and emission regulations. This meant new safety features like larger bumpers needed to be affixed to the car that could protect the vehicle and its occupants at certain speeds. Engines were detuned to comply with safety and emission concerns. The cars became safer but their performance was seriously crippled. This was true for the Camaro in 1973 when its highest producing engine was a 350 cubic-inch V-8 that produced 245 horsepower.

New for 1973 was an LT option which included impact-absorbing bumpers. The Camaro grew in size in 1974 due to a forward sloping grille and new aluminum bumpers. Rectangular bumpers replaced the round taillight designs. Sales of the Z28 package continued to decline so the decision was made to discontinue the option after 1974.

Horsepower was measured in NET rather than gross rating beginning in 1975. This meant that the reported horsepower was much lower than in prior years. The 350 cubic-inch V8 was now rated at about 155 horsepower.

In 1977 the Z28 was re-introduced in an effort to revitalize the muscle-car persona of the Camaro. The base Camaro's were outfitted with air-conditioning and an automatic transmission. A Borg-Warner Super T-10 four-speed manual gearbox could be ordered as optional equipment.

1978 marked the first year for the T-top option on a Camaro. The Camaro was given larger taillights and new bumpers.

As vehicles became safer, they became slower. The public shifted from wanting performance to luxury. Oil embargos and rising fuel costs had made the engines smaller but more fuel efficient. For 1979 the LT package was replaced with a luxurious Berlinetta that included special wheels, paint, emblems, and interior.

1979 was a very strong year for Camaro sales with 282,571 examples being sold.

1980 and 1981 saw very few changes. The hood scope on the Z-28 was revised to help siphon air to the engine.

In 1981 sales were down considerable to just over 126,000. This would be the final year for the second generation Camaro.

In 1982 General Motors introduced the third generation of the Camaro. The vehicle was stylish and versatile, earning the coveted Motor Trend magazine's Car of the Year. Both aesthetically and mechanically, the vehicle was improved. The suspension was upgraded making it more capable in the corners and at speed.

This was the first year the Camaro was equipped with a factory fuel-injected engine. A four-speed automatic gearbox replaced the three-speed unit. A five-speed manual gearbox was also available. Due to rising concerns of oil shortage, a four-cylinder engine was offered for part of 1982.

6000 examples of the Z28 Camaro were sold to commemorate the return of the pony-car to the Indianapolis 500. The special-edition vehicles were painted in two-tone silver and blue paint with orange pin-striping.

To honor the International Race of Champions, Chevrolet introduced the IROC-Z in 1985. The package included an improved suspension, decal package, and a 305 cubic-inch L98 Tuned Port Injection system borrowed from the Corvette. The IROC-Z was featured on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best List for 1985.

The L69 small-block engine was offered from 1983 through 1986. The LB9 small-block was introduced in 1985; the L98 small-block was introduced in 1987; the LO3 was introduced in 1988. The LB9, L98, and LO3 stayed in production until 1992.

1992 was the final year for the third generation Camaro. 1993 marked the beginning of the fourth generation which persisted until 2002.

New technology and material made the fourth generation greatly improved over the prior years. Weight was reduced with the use of plastic body panels sitting atop a steel space frame. Performance was increased thanks in part to a better suspension system. In 1993 Chevrolet offered the LT1 eight-cylinder engine, which had been in production for a year on the Corvette, on the Camaro. A six-speed manual gearbox was offered with the LT1 engine.

The Camaro returned to the Indianapolis 500 as the honorary pace car in 1993. To commemorate this historic accomplishment, Chevrolet offered a limited quantity of special edition Camaro's, painted in a black and white color scheme.

The design and mechanics remained mostly unchanged over the next few years. Minor revisions were made to comply with newly introduced emission standards. Mechanical changes were made to correct problems that had been found throughout the years.

In 1996 the RS package and the SS package were re-introduced. The RS was an appearance option for the six-cylinder Camaro's while the SS was both an appearance and performance package for the eight-cylinder cars.

1997 marked the 30th anniversary of the Camaro. A 30th Anniversary Package was offered to honor this accomplishment. The vehicles were painted white with orange stripes. 100 of the Anniversary Camaros were given the LT4 engine with 330 horsepower; a thirty-eight thousand dollar price tag accompanied the vehicle.

The interior of the Camaro was modernized in 1997 and again in 1998, although the 1998 improvements were minor in comparison to what transpired the prior year.

The body design was drastically changed in 1998, mainly in the front. Round headlights replaced the square design. The headlights were flush, inline with the rest of the body. A new grille and bumper were used, both positioned a little differently to mimic the headlight changes. A new powerful, lightweight, all-aluminum LS1 power-plant retired the LT1 unit. The OHV LS1 was borrowed from the Corvette and slightly detuned to produce just over 300 horsepower. To handle this extra power, the disc brakes were enlarged and the suspension was upgraded.

Total production for 1998 was 48490. This was disappointing for General Motors, especially with the newly revised body and powerful options. The lowest production year for the Camaro occurred in 2001 with just over 29000 examples being produced. This was due to low sales and production ceasing early to begin work on the 35th Anniversary 2002 cars.

2002 marked the final year for production of the fifth generation Camaro. The styling and mechanics were unmodified, carrying the same design from 1999.

A special 35th Anniversary Edition was offered and could be ordered on all trim levels and packages. The 35th Anniversary SS Camaro could only be ordered as a convertible or with T-Tops. Around 3000 examples of the 35th Anniversary Edition were created. Total production for the year was just over 42,000.

On August 27th, 2002 production ceased. The Camaro had accomplished its goal, to provide competition for the Ford Mustang and other compact, low-priced, sports cars. Outfitted with large, Corvette engines, matted to effective gearboxes and given great suspension and brakes, the Camaro was truly a performance machine that was capable and fun to drive. It was fairly practical with room for more than two passengers. It was economical with sticker-prices in the range that many could afford. The production of the Camaro has ceased, but its future has not yet been written. Expect to see this legendary vehicle on the roadways in the near future.

By Daniel Vaughan | May 2011
For more information and related vehicles, click here

Model Year Changes

  • A new V-6 Performance Handling Package became available.
  • An intermediate RS option became available, adding lower-body aero trim and a 3-piece spoiler to base coupes and convertibles.
  • An SS (Super Sport) option became available for the Z28. This option, produced by SLP Engineering (an outside firm), added wider wheels and tires, suspension and styling modifications, and a functional hood scoop. The engine in the SS was rated at 305 HP.
  • New optional anti-theft system.
  • New second gear select switch on V-6 powered Camaros with automatic gearboxes. This switched allowed the car to start in second gear for situations where road conditions were slippery.
  • T-tops became available as optional equipment on coupes.
  • The 3.8-liter V6 engine became standard in base Camaros.
  • The 5.7-liter V8 engine gained 10 horsepower.
  • SUBARU ANNOUNCES PRICING ON 2015 IMPREZA® MODELS
    ◾Well- equipped Impreza pricing begins at $18,195 ◾Revised front styling with new headlights, grille and bumper ◾Rear Vision Camera standard across line ◾EyeSight® Driver Assist Technology now available ◾New Infotainment systems and features ◾Best fuel economy of any gasoline all-wheel drive passenger car; now up to 28 mpg city/37 mpg highway/31 mpg combined Cherry Hill, N.J. - Subaru of America, Inc., today announced pricing on the remodeled Impreza® line of compact 4-door and 5...[Read more...]
    TRW FORWARD CAMERA AND SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES FEATURED ON ALL-NEW JEEP CHEROKEE
    LIVONIA, Mich., Jan. 21, 2014 - Safety and electronics innovations from TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. (NYSE: TRW) are featured on the new 2014 Jeep Cherokee models, including TRW's scalable video camera (S-Cam 2) – a forward-looking object recognition camera that provides lane keeping assist and high beam headlamp control, and helps assist in collision mitigation braking. The all-new Cherokee is now available in Jeep dealerships and is one of the most technically advanced Sport Utility...[Read more...]
    DODGE ANNOUNCES PRICING FOR NEW 2014 DODGE DURANGO
    Best-equipped Seven Passenger SUV Loaded With Advanced Technology, Efficiency, Performance and Style for a Starting U.S. MSRP Less Than $30,000. ◾The new Dodge Durango features a slew of new standard features for 2014, including a new standard eight-speed automatic transmission with steering-wheel mounted paddle shifters, Uconnect Bluetooth, 5-inch Uconnect Touch Screen and 7-inch customizable gauge cluster, signature Dodge brand LED racetrack taillamps and standard three-row, seven pass...[Read more...]
    MAZDA ANNOUNCES PRICING AND FUEL ECONOMY OF ALL-NEW 2014 MAZDA3
    ◾Redesigned Compact Car Offers Competitive Pricing, Best-in-Class Fuel Economy IRVINE, Calif., July 24, 2013 - Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) today announced official pricing and fuel economy figures for the all-new 2014 Mazda3. Starting at $16,9451 MSRP, the redesigned compact vehicle is the brand's best-selling and most recognizable nameplate worldwide with more than 3.5 million vehicles sold. With the full complement of SKYACTIV®2 technologies combined with the handsome st...[Read more...]
    2014 MITSUBISHI LANCER: OUTSTANDING COMPACT SPORTS SEDAN VALUE
     Looking for a compact sports sedan that's easy on the wallet? Want an affordably-priced 4-door offering high-performance, a turbocharged engine and all-wheel drive? Mitsubishi Motors has the answer with a choice of four unique 2014 Lancer models to choose from. What's more, each of these available 2014 Lancer models – from the well-equipped entry-level Lancer ES, to the bargain-priced Lancer SE AWC with the company's famed electronically-controlled All-Wheel Control all-wheel drive system, to...[Read more...]

    Arrow Right 1996 Chevrolet models
    Chevrolet Beretta
    Chevrolet Corvette
    Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport
    Chevrolet Impala

    Collectible: A Gathering of the Exceptional and Captivating
    Similar Automakers
    CadillacChrysler
    DodgeFord
    GMCHummer
    JeepLincoln
    MercuryPontiac
    Saturn
    Similarly Sized Vehicles from 1996
    Alfa Romeo Nuvola Concept
    Chevrolet Camaro C8
    Ferrari 348 Challenge
    Ferrari F355
    Ferrari F355 Challenge
    Fiat Multipla
    McLaren F1 GTR
    Nissan Stagea Autech 260RS
    Oldsmobile Ciera
    Pontiac Firebird

     
    Chevrolet: 1991-2000
    Similar Automakers
    Chevrolet History
    Other models by Chevrolet
    Manufacturer Website
    Vehicle Recall Information

    Chevrolet
    Monthly Sales FiguresVolume
    October 2014155,965 
    September 2014153,873 
    August 2014185,930 
    July 2014175,155 
    June 2014188,567 
    May 2014205,010 
    April 2014181,648 
    March 2014179,681 
    February 2014153,913 
    January 2014119,089 
    December 2013153,493 
    November 2013145,089 
    (More Details)

     
    150
    210
    Astro
    Avalanche
    Aveo
    Bel Air
    Beretta
    Biscayne
    Blazer
    C10 / K10
    Camaro
    Cameo
    Caprice
    Cavalier
    Chevelle
    Citation
    Cobalt
    Colorado
    Corvair
    Corvette
    Corvette GTP
    Cruze
    DB Master
    Deluxe Series
    El Camino
    El Morocco
    Equinox
    Express
    Fleetline
    HHR
    Impala
    Kingswood
    Laguna
    Malibu
    Metro
    Model 3100
    Model H
    Monte Carlo
    Monza
    Nova
    Prizm
    RPO B2K Twin Turbo
    S-10
    Series 490
    Series C
    Series L
    Silverado
    Sonic
    Spark
    Special Series
    SS
    SSR
    Styleline
    Suburban
    Tahoe
    Task Force (Apache)
    Tracker
    TrailBlazer
    Traverse
    Trax
    Uplander
    Vega
    Venture
    Volt

    Image Left 1995 Camaro1997 Camaro Image Right
    © 1998-2014. All rights reserved. The material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.