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1969 DeTomaso Mangusta news, pictures, specifications, and information
Coupe
Designer: Ghia
 
Low, sleek, and potent, the Mangusta was the creation that put the mercurial Alejandro de Tomaso on the map as a purveyor of sexy sports cars. Based on his earlier Vallelunga, the mid-engined Mangusta, Italian for Mongoose, had something its four-cylinder predecessor did not: a Ford V8 rumbling behind the driver's shoulder blades.

The racy design is attributed to a young Giorgetto Giugiaro of the Ghia studio. A pair of gull wing doors covered the engine bay, where the Ford V8 fed power to a ZF five-speed transaxle. Unveiled at the 1966 Turin Auto Show, Mangusta production began in early 1967. Models destined for the United States were powered by Ford's 302 cubic-inch V8, rated at 220 horsepower. Some 400 Mangustas were produced from 1967 through 1971, of which fewer than 200 are known to survive.

This car was built for GM's Vice-President of Design, Bill Mitchell who had spied a Mangusta prototype in Turin. He asked DeTomaso to build him one - just not with a Ford engine. Alejandro told him to send whatever engine he liked to the factory in Modena and he'd install it. Mitchell assigned the task to Zora Arkus Duntov who in turn had GM Engineering hand-build a 350 horsepower LT79 Corvette engine. A simple three-quarter thick aluminum adapter plate was all that was needed to mate the standard ZF gearbox to the Chevy. The current owner worked at GM Design at the time and bought the car shortly thereafter. He's owned it since 1969 and drives it frequently.
Coupe
Designer: Ghia
Chassis Num: 8MA-798302112
 
Sold for $52,800 at 2006 Worldwide Auctioneers.
The examples shown, finished in Maroon paint color and black leather interior, has chassis number 8MA-798302112. It was expected to fetch between $48,000-$58,000 at the 2006 Worldwide Group Auction held on Hilton Head Island. At the conclusion of the bidding, it found a new home at $52,800.
By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2007
Coupe
Designer: Ghia
 
Low, sleek, and potent, the Mangusta was the creation that put the mercurial Alejandro de Tomaso on the map as a purveyor of sexy sports cars. Based on his earlier Vallelunga, the mid-engine Mangusta, Italian for Mongoose, had something its four-cylinder predecessor did not; a Ford V8 rumbling behind the driver's shoulder blades.

The racy steel and aluminum design is attributed to a young Giorgetto Giugiaro of the Ghia studio. A pair of now-iconic gullwing doors covered the engine bay, where the Ford V8 fed power to a ZF five-speed transaxle. Disc brakes were standard at all four corners as was four wheel independent suspension and rack-and-pinion steering.

Unveiled at the 1966 Turin auto show, Mangusta production began in early 1967. Models destined for the United States were powered by Ford's 3302 cubic-inch V8 and rated at 220 horsepower. In total, some 400 Mangustas were produced from 1967 through 1971, of which fewer than 200 are known to survive.

The current, and only third, owner bought this car in 1955 with just 12,000 miles showing on the odometer. A recently completed ground-up restoration uncovered evidence suggesting this automobile made be on its second 100,000 miles.
Coupe
Designer: Ghia
Chassis Num: 185
 
Alejandro de Tomaso was the son of a wealthy Argentinian rancher (the logo is a fusion of Argentina's national colors with the family cattle brand). Opposition to Juan Peron forced him to flee his country and, after marrying a wealthy American auto racing enthusiast, he began building race cars. The name Mangusta (Italian for 'mongoose,' a cobra killer) -- allegedly was chosen because Ford reneged on selling him its 289 V8, which it decided to use for the Shelby Cobra. Giorgetto Giugiaro designed the car for Ghia of Modena, Italy. First shown in 1966, production of Mangusta started the following year and 402 vehicles were made before production ended in 1971. 250 were sold in the United States and fewer than 128 still exist. The car is powered by a 221 horsepower, 302 cubic-inch V8 engine and equipped with a 5-speed ZF transaxle.

This original and unrestored example, number 185, has only 36,000 original miles, was imported by Qvale British Motors of San Francisco, CA.
Coupe
Designer: Ghia
Chassis Num: 1196
 
This original 3,700 mile Mangusta, number 1196, was one of the group of the last 55 of the 401 examples that were built from 1967 to 1971. It was personally owned by Eugene Bordinat, then Vice President of all Ford World Design from 1961 to 1970, though it was used as a styling element at the Ford Design Center at Dearborn, Michigan to see if another production run could happen with a restyled body for USA regulations. This Mangusta, as most all other four headlight versions, was imported into America not having to pass federal regulations.

Mr. Bordinat was the world-famous auto design magnate for Ford Motor Company and this was his prize possession. He was responsible for the design of all Ford and Lincoln Mercury vehicles; but is especially remembered for his design of the elegant Town Car, the Mustang, and incredibly successful Lincoln Mark Series.

This vehicle was imported into the United States by Mr. Bordinat himself and cherished throughout his life. It was known to be proudly driven with gloved hands to his design studio in Dearborn, Michigan only on the most perfect of days.

While develooping Pantera Prototypes together at Ghia Studios in Italy; both Mr. Bordinat and Alejandro DeTomaso personally supervised the Ghia Studio custom prototype redesigning, and building of this particular vehicle. This was during the time period of Ford's courtship of DeTomaso by Mr. Bordinat on Ford's behalf, leading to the eventual Pantera program.

This car, number 1196, also became the prototype for what could have been the second production series of the Mangusta had Mercury/Lincoln seen fit to do a longer production run of Mangusta outfitted with real bumpers and pollution controls so to satisfy the 1971 USA government regulations. Also Mercury/Lincoln needed a boutique car that could be mass produced not the slow hand built method. So Tom Tjaarda was given the go-ahead to create the Pantera which met collision regulations and could be mass produced.

This leatherette front bumper with overrides was created by Ford World Design Center in Dearborn to simulate a proposed urethane energy absorbing front bumper. The spoiler may have come from a Mustang 500 KR and was added to hold down the front end at speed and to provide better radiator cooling.

Henry Ford II and Eugene Bordinat did not get along with Alejandro DeTomaso very well and so when Ford and Ghia modified this car, they removed all DeTomaso names and badging and substituted GHIA emblems, even as far as placing the emblems in the large gauges.

The cars plate of manufacture is stamped June, 1969, although all the glass build dates are December 1969 and Mrs. DeTomaso states this was one of the last ones finished in 1971.
First shown in 1966, the production of Mangusta started the following year, reaching the number of 402 vehicles manufactured and thus representing the final step of De Tomaso towards the world of high-performance cars (a well-known category in Modena). In 1967 the take-over of Ghia was determining, and prototype 70P became Mangusta. This name is strictly related to that of the contender Ford Cobra, since Mangusta is the only animal feared by cobra.

Equipped wîth a backbone chassis, a 4729 cc engine - 250 km/h max speed -, Mangusta underwent several changes before the production began. However, Giugiaro's basic layout was maintained. According to the sporting soul of the car, the design was extreme, probably at the expence of the vehicle habitability. Very soon Alejandro De Tomaso realized that Mangusta was the right product to be sold in the Únited States; as a matter of fact, 250 cars were purchased by American customers. There are two models of De Tomaso Mangusta.

The first is a spider, which throughout many changes due to the owners' wishes has been finally brought back to its original design. 'Raped' by these modifications, the car could hardly be recognized, but its original features were successfully recovered in Modena plant. The second, a unique vehicle as the first model, is a hard-top spider owned by a Greek fan. All Mangusta cars were equipped wîth Ford engines, except this one ordered by the GM vice-president William L. Mitchell, who sent a Chevrolet engine to Modena. Únfortunately, it was lacking of some pieces.

Sent back to Detroit, Mangusta could run thanks to American mechanics' work. All the same Mitchell could not drive his admired car, as the seat was too small for him (his face was pressed against the driving mirror!). However, this problem did not put an end to the love for such a car, which nowadays is still being studied in General Motors. Manufactured until 1971, Mangusta levelled the ground to Pantera.

Source - DeTomaso Modena S.p.A.
Alejandro de Tomaso had many avocations before his career in the automotive world. He was born in Argentina in 1928. His mother family had been wealthy Argentine cattle farmers and his father had immigrated from Italy. By age 15 Alejandro left school to pursue the cattle business. Within a few years he was running the family business and racing on the side. He also provided financial support to an underground newspaper that opposed the president at the time, Juan Peron. His support forced him to flew to Italy to escape political prosecution. While in Italy he began working for Maserati as a mechanic and later became a racer car driver. His passion for racing led him to his wife, a wealthy American lady who was also a race car driver. Within a few years, backed by two prominent families, Alejandro formed his own company, the De Tomaso Automobili. The company focused on building mostly racers which utilized mid-engined placement. His success in racing attracted Ford, who were seating for suitable candidates to utilize their engines. With the design expertise of Ghia and Vignale, Alegandro began producing production vehicles. The first attempt was not as successful as hoped. It was the Vallelunga which was powered by a Ford Cortina engine which produced 100 horsepower. The transmission was courtesy of Volkswagen and the body-shell was comprised of fiberglass. The next attempt at the competitve production automobile market was the Ghia designed Mangusta. It appeared in 1967 and its mid-engined placement and brilliant design made the vehicle instantly popular. The Mangusta was a true sports car, being just 40 inches in height. Aluminum was used for the hood, and gullwing rear deck lids. The rest of the areas were mostly steel. There was seating for two with the seats using the finest leather material available. The engine was powerful enough to carry the car to speeds of over 150 mph. Production lasted from 1967 through 1971 with just over 400 examples being produced.
By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2007
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