Concept Carz Home Concepts and PrototypesAbout Follow ConceptCarz on Facebook Follow ConceptCarz on Twitter RSS News Feed
 
 ManufacturersArrow PictureJaguarArrow PictureXKSS (1957 - 1957)Arrow Picture1957 Jaguar XKSS 
1958 Tojeiro D-Type Image Right
 
Image credits: © Jaguar.

1957 Jaguar XKSS news, pictures, specifications, and information

Twenty-five of the 68 Jaguar D-Type race cars were left unsold when Jaguar decided to cease its participation in the International Sports Car Racing program. Jaguar decided to convert the 25 remaining vehicles into road-worthy sports cars.
The rear fin was removed, bumpers were added, and the single seater was left topless with a canvas hood available to protect the driver from the elements. A windscreen was designed and a second door was added to accommodate passengers. With a Dual-Overhead Cam straight-six cylinder engine with 3442 cc capacity, the vehicle could race from zero to sixty in 7.3 seconds. The 250 horsepower output was capable of propelling the car to a top speed of nearly 150 miles-per-hour. Excellent stopping power was provided by the 4-wheel disc brakes.

In 1957, the XKSS was introduced at the New York Auto Show.

Sixteen private buyers purchased the XK-SS with the majority going to the United States. Two went to Canada, one to Hong Kong, one in the UK, and the rest to America. There were over 300 examples being built when a fire destroyed the machinery, assembly line, and most of the XKSS models. Steve McQueen, a film star and motor racing fan purchased one. McQueen is famous for his documentary of the 24 Hours of LeMans.

By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2010
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 728
 
XKSS728 was originally produced as XKD547 by Jaguar Cars. It was displayed at the Barcelona Motor Show in 1956 but was not sold. It was returned to Jaguar Cars in Coventry, and converted by them into XKSS728. It is one of only 16 produced by Jaguar. The car was sold to Jaguar Cars of North America and displayed at the Chicago Motor Show in 1957. John Norvym of Chicago purchased the car with a Ferrari Super America as part exchange. He used the car sparingly until 1968, when he placed it in a heated garage. The car was sold in the Christies Pebble Beach Auction in 1998 to the present owner. The car was sent to England to be re-commissioned. it was carefully dismantled and essential parts, such as valve springs, bearings and brake seals, were replaced. The car is remarkable in that it is almost entirely untouched and original.
By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2010
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
 
The Jaguar XKSS was the road-going version of the racing D-Type. At the end of the D-Type production, 25 of the 68 race cars built remained unsold at the factory. These were adapted for the road with the addition of weather protection and a second door. The D's rear fin was removed, but remaining beneath the road-going version's more sober skin was a powerful sports car that could go from zero to sixty in 7 seconds and was capable of a top speed of over 150 mph. Sixteen XKSSs were quickly sold, with most going to the United States. Sadly, later in 1957, with 300 new XKSSs in production, a fire destroyed the Jaguar factory. This XKSS has spent all of its life in Canada and the United States.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 763
 
This Jaguar XKSS is thought to have been displayed at the New York Auto Show. It was then sold through the East Coast Jaguar distributor, Alfred Momo, to its first owner Anthony Rugiero. It has no known racing history and only changed hands again in 1983. In 1985, it was bought by Richard Freshman, who also owned the ex-McQueen car (XKSS 713), and in 1986 it went to Dietrich von Boetticher in Germany. Despite some damage in a collision with a guardrail during the 1980s, it is a very original car.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 710
 
This Jaguar's first owner, Don Horn, did not keep this car for long and several owners are recorded until 1966 when it was wrecked by the sales manager of Delavan Lee, a Jaguar dealership. In 1970 the car was bought by Florida collector Walter Hill, who initially restored it as a shortnose D-Type production car, but then had it re-restored in 1991 as a longnose D-type with a specification similar to the 1956 works cars. In 2005, it was bought by Gary Bartlett who had it rebuilt back to its XKSS form. The car was sold again in 2006 and is now privately owned.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 716
 
The first owner of this Jaguar XKSS used the car for racing and hill-climbing in Canada with some success. Subsequent owners continued to race the car through 1961. It then moved to an owner in Ohio, and later in New York, but around 1980 was sold to John Harper in England. He had it converted by Lynx Engineering to D-Type specification and the car continued to be raced by Harper and later by Jaguar guru John Pearson in the United Kingdom. In 1993 the car returned to the United States. it is now privately owned and is used for vintage racing and tours.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 713
 
Soon after this Jaguar XKSS was built in 1957, Jim Peterson sold the car to TV personality and sports car racer Bill Leyden of Beverly Hills, who in turn sold it to movie star Steve McQueen. He had the car painted ark green. In 1967 McQueen sold the car to the William Harrah Automobile Collection of Reno, Nevada, but he bought it back in 1978. After McQueen's death in 1984, the car was bought by his friend and neighbor Richard Freshman, who had it overhauled by Jaguar specialist Lynx Engineering in England. In 2000 the car was acquired by the Petersen Automotive Museum of Los Angeles.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 754
 
It is believed that this Jaguar XKSS was sold through Joe Shepherd Motors of Tampa, Florida, to its first owner who had it painted silver and raced it until around 1961. The second owner, Joe Scherer, damaged the car in a hill climb and sold it in damaged condition to Bill Culbertson of Dayton, Ohio. A major restoration was eventually completed with the help of Lynx Engineering in England. The car was sold by RM Auctions to its present U.S. owner, who has used it for a number of historic tours and events.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 725
 
Very little is known about the history of this Jaguar XKSS. The first owner shipped it to Cuba where it took part in the infamous high-speed run against XKSS 766 from Havana to Vera Dero beach in 1957. Years later, in the 1980s, this car and XKSS 766 were found in Cuba by English collector Colin Crabbe. He succeeded in buying both cars, and in 1987 had them shipped to England where they were rebuilt by Hall & Fowler for the German Donhoff collection. The car was sold to its present owner in 2009.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 766
 
The first owner of this Jaguar XKSS, J.B. 'Pepillo' Del Cuerto took delivery of the car in Miami and had it shipped straight to Cuba. He and fellow XKSS owner Fausto Gonzalez Chavez tested their cars in a high-speed run during which Del Cuerto crashed and was killed. The wrecked car was kept undisturbed in a junkyard on the island until 1967 when it was liberated by Cabrera and Chaguito and the car was made roadworthy although rarely used. It was rediscovered and bought by Colin Crabbe in 1986. The car was restored by Hall & Fowler in the United Kingdom for German collector Donhoff. In 1996 it went to Dean Meiling in the United States who used it many events before selling in 2010.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 769
 
This Jaguar XKSS was supplied to its first owner through Ted Baumgartner who had it repainted Buick Maroon. The first owner, American race driver Tossie Alex, owned the car into the early 1960s and raced it at Road America, Meadowdale and other SCCA race meetings. In 1964 it was for sale in New York and by 1971 it was in Illinois. In 1991 it was bought by Gerald Nell of Wisconsin, who owned it for 18 years and put 20,000 miles on the car, driving it in historic events in both Europe and the United States. In 2009 the car joined a major private car collection in England.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 704
 
This Jaguar XKSS was raced by a Dr. Thompson and other amateur race drivers from 1957 to 1960. Sadly, at Marlboro, Maryland, on June 7, 1958, the car crashed in practice and its driver, Steve Spitler, was killed. The car was rebuilt and passed to Ronald Scranton in 1960. He used it until 1964 and then stored it away, until selling it to Jaguar collector Walter Hill in Florida. In 1974, Stirling Moss drove this car for a documentary about the Sebring Circuit in Florida where so many Jaguar victories took place. Hill restored the car to its original specification and it was then sold at the Gooding auction at Pebble Beach in 2005.
Roadster
Designer: Malcolm Sayer
Chassis Num: 722
 
This is the only Jaguar XKSS that was initially sold to an owner in England. It was 'road tested' by basil Boothroyd for the satirical Punch magazine in London, with illustrations by motoring cartoonist Brockbank. In 1958, it was bought by Colonel Ronnie Hoare, of the Ferrari importers Maranello Concessionaires. From 1960 to 1962, it was owned by Bob Gibson-Jarvie of the finance company UDT. After an accident in 1963 the car was rebuilt in D-Type form and raced by Bill Rigg until sold to amateur racer Nigel Moores. In the late 1980s it was returned to its original XKSS specification and in 1989 it was acquired for the Louwman collection of the Dutch National Motor Museum at The Hague.
The Jaguar D-Type sports cars were produced from 1954 through 1957. These factory-built race cars were similar to the C-Type, but given more powerful engines, improved chassis, and aerodynamic bodies.
Walter Hassan was tasked with designing a sportscar for Jaguar. The result was the XK-120 which showed promise on the racing circuit. Although the alloy bodied cars were fast, it would not be a serious contender at the 24 Hours of Le Mans race. Further development was needed. In 1951 the XK 120 C, also known as the C-Type, was prepared and ready for testing at Le Mans. The straight-six cylinder engine had been modified to production 210 horsepower and various other mechanical enhancements greatly improve the performance. Three C-Types were entered in the Le Mans race with two failing to finish. The third C-Type finished strong, winning the event while averaging 93.49 miles-per-hour.

Three experimental C-Types were entered in LeMans in 1952. A long tail had been applied to the C-Type in an effort to improve aerodynamics and stability during the long, straight stretches. Unfortunately, all three failed to finish due to overheating problems. For 1953, the use of experimental bodies was scrapped in favor of the tradition bodies. The factory cars were fitted with disc brakes. In the end, this combination proved to be all that was necessary to score top finishes.

To stay ahead of the competition, Jaguar began working on a Le Mans replacement for the C-Type, resulting in six D-Types in 1954.

The D-Type was constructed of a monocoque-type chassis welded to a subframe. Later versions of the car were bolted, rather than welded, to allow easy detachment.

The same XK engine was used, albeit with minor modifications such as the use of dry-sump lubrication. The frontal area to house the engine was decreased. This was to provide for higher top speeds as Le Mans. A large fin was place behind the driver to provide stability at speeds in excess of 150 mph. Due to the new design, additional modifications to the shape and size of the engine were required to fit it into the engine bay. It was tilted 8-degrees, resulting in an off-center bump in the hood. The 1955 D-Types used asymmetrical heads, known as '35/40' heads, with intake valves positioned at 35-degress and exhaust valves at 40-degrees.

Four D-Types were entered into the 1954 Le Mans race and were not enough to beat the powerful Ferraris. 1955 modifications propelled the Jaguar marque to its third LeMans victory. A Mercedes-Benz SLR was leading the Jaguar by two laps when it was withdrawn from the race.

Though 1955 meant another victory at LeMans for Jaguar, it was a devastating year for the sport. The Mercedes-Benz SLR's were poised to capture the victory when a tragic accident occurred, involving an SLR, and killing the driver and 80 spectators. Mercedes-Benz withdrew from the race and from motorsports.

Most of the D-Types were single seaters and built for the race track. During the final year of production, Jaguar offered the Jaguar XKSS, a street version of the race car.

XKSS

Twenty-five of the 68 Jaguar D-Type race cars were left unsold when Jaguar decided to cease its participation in the International Sports Car Racing program. Jaguar decided to convert the 25 remaining vehicles into road-worthy sports cars.

Bumpers were added and the single-seater was left topless with a canvas hood available to protect the driver from the elements. A windscreen was designed and a second door was added to accommodate passengers. With a Dual-Overhead Cam straight-six cylinder engine with 3442 cc capacity, the vehicle could race from zero to sixty in 7.3 seconds. The 250 horsepower output was capable of propelling the car to a top speed of nearly 150 miles-per-hour. Excellent stopping power was provided by the 4-wheel disc brakes.

In 1957, the XKSS was introduced at the New York Auto Show.

Sixteen private buyers purchased the XK-SS with the majority going to the United States. Two went to Canada, one to Hong Kong, one in the UK, and the rest to America. Later, a fire destroyed the machinery, assembly line, and most of the XKSS models. Steve McQueen, a film star and motor racing fan purchased one. McQueen is famous for his documentary of the 24 Hours of LeMans.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jun 2008
For more information and related vehicles, click here

McQueen's Famous 1956 Jaguar Coming to Pinehurst Concours
VILLAGE OF PINEHURST, N.C. (April 16, 2014) – A 1956 Jaguar XKSS owned by movie legend Steve McQueen, now housed at the world famous Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, will make the cross country trip from California to North Carolina and be displayed at the 2014 Pinehurst Concours d'Elegance. McQueen, called 'The King of Cool,' became the highest paid movie star in the world in 1974 and starred in such movies at 'Bullitt,' 'The Great Escape' and 'Papillon.' McQueen, who was al...[Read more...]
RRDC VOTES IN 37 NEW MEMBERS FOR 2013
 HILLIARD, Ohio (Nov. 7, 2013) - Thirty-seven race-car drivers and motorsports professionals have been voted into the Road Racing Drivers Club in 2013. The group includes 13 Regular Members from the open-wheel and sports-car racing ranks, 20 Associate Members and four Honorary Members. The current roster of RRDC members now numbers 440. Voting was held among all current RRDC members. 'This year's crop of new Regular Members truly represents the spirit of the RRDC, as each driver has de...[Read more...]
Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca to Host 2014 SCCA National Championship Runoffs
MONTEREY, Calif. (July 10, 2013) – The Sports Car Club of America today announced the host sites of the next three SCCA® National Championship Runoffs®, including the first visit for amateur road racing's top event to Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in 2014. Daytona International Speedway, in 2015, and Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, in 2016, will also hold events over the next three years. The return to the west coast and Monterey's Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca comes 50 years after the inaugural ...[Read more...]
Sonoma Historic Motorsports Festival Celebrates Corvette'S 60 Years At Sonoma Raceway
• Fast cars, fine food and wine highlight May 18-19 weekend
• Paul Reinhart is honored guest, popular racing seminar scheduled for second year
SONOMA, Calif. (April 27, 2013) - The Sonoma Historic Motorsports Festival returns to Sonoma Raceway on May 18-19 for the fourth straight year under that title. The program for the 27th annual historic-car event organized by General Racing Ltd. in Sonoma will celebrate the 60th Anniversary of the popular Corvette, created by the ...[Read more...]
The WeatherTech® CHICAGO REGION SCCA JUNE SPRINTS®
Winning the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) June Sprints at Road America has been every sports car driver's dream since the thrilling first event in 1956. That's when a tall, curly-haired chicken farmer from Texas named Carroll Shelby drove all night to make the race, jumped into the cockpit of a Ferrari 121 LM without even changing out of his work clothes - striped farmer's overalls - and won the 152-mile feature. No one back then knew that his win would set the tone for his momentous racing ...[Read more...]

Arrow Right 1957 Jaguar models
Jaguar Mark 1
Jaguar XK-140

Collectible: A Gathering of the Exceptional and Captivating
Similar Automakers
AudiBMW
HondaInfiniti
Land RoverLexus
Mercedes-BenzNissan
SaabSubaru
ToyotaVolkswagen
Volvo
Similarly Sized Vehicles from 1957
Alfa Romeo 1900 Primavera
Aston Martin DB 2/4 MKIII
BMW 507
BMW 507 Loewy Concept
Chevrolet Corvette C1
Ferrari 250 GT
Ferrari 250 GT Boano
Ferrari 250 GT California
Ferrari 250 GT Ellena
Ferrari 250 GT TdF

 
Jaguar: 1951-1960
Similar Automakers
Jaguar History
Other models by Jaguar
Manufacturer Website

Jaguar
Monthly Sales FiguresVolume
March 20141,816 
February 20141,552 
January 20141,347 
December 20131,544 
November 20131,446 
October 20131,515 
September 20131,313 
August 20131,723 
July 20131,613 
June 20131,637 
May 20131,435 
April 20131,141 
(More Details)

 
1.5 Litre
C-Type
D-Type
E-Series
Mark
Mark IV
Mark IX
Mark V
Mark VII
Mark X
S-Type
SS 100
SS II
X-Type
XF
XJ
XJ-S
XJ220
XJR Group 44, IMSA, and Group C
XK
XK Series
XKSS

1958 Tojeiro D-Type Image Right
© 1998-2014. All rights reserved. The material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.