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1934 Packard 1108 Twelve news, pictures, specifications, and information

Sport Phaeton
Coachwork: LeBaron
 
The V12 Packards were produced from 1932 through 1939. The 1934s are especially prized for their graceful concession to the trend toward streamlining while still retaining the Packard classic upright body style.

Only four LeBaron Model 1108 Sport Phaetons were produced and each was a full custom model. All four still exist today. This car was delivered to W.A. Collins, Inc. Hollywood, CA, on May 12th of 1934, and the first owner was rumored to have been Clark Gable, but this has not been proven. This car sold for $7,820 on August 21, 1933, almost double the cost of a standard 1934 model.

The car is powered by a side-valve, 445.47 cubic-inch, V12 engine, producing 160 horsepower, coupled to a three-speed synchro-mesh manual transmission. It was capable of about 90 mph. It rides smoothly on a 147-inch wheelbase.

The current owners restored this car in 2008.
Convertible Victoria
Coachwork: Dietrich
Chassis Num: 1108-65
 
The Packard Twelve was built from 1933 to 1939 with over 35,000 examples produced. It is considered by many to be one of the finest automobiles produced by Packard and one of the most significant creations of the Classic Era. Most of the Packard Twelves received factory bodies; only a handful received custom coachwork by such greats as LeBaron and Dietrich. This unique example has semi-custom features including the distinctive Raymond Dietrich styled teardrop fenders. Dietrich used a Custom Victoria body as a starting point for the design, which was built by Packard as an in-house special.
Convertible Runabout
Coachwork: Dietrich
 
The 1934 Packard Custom Dietrich Model 1108 Convertible Runabout was very rare. Only a few were built. Today only three of these rare vehicles still exist.

This vehicle came equipped with a V12, 445.5 cubic inch, 160 bhp engine, only 960 of these engines were produced. This custom design is built on the 157 inch wheelbase, the longest for a two-door Packard.

This particular car was first owned by the famous and much married New York playboy Tommy Manville also known as 'Marrying Manville.' The car was the New York City Show entry for Packard in 1934 and cost around $14,000, an unheard of amount at the time.

Many Packard collectors consider this the best work of any Detrich and one of the most beautiful Packards ever built.
Runabout Speedster
Coachwork: LeBaron
 
This beautiful LeBaron Sport Phaeton was one of the most recognizable V12 Packard's ever built. It was meant to be a companion to LeBaron's sleek Speedster Runabout. Both aerodynamic open models were heavily based on the designs of stylist Ed Macauley. This exquisite 4-passenger automobile used a flip-up tonneau cowl with a folding windshield and shared fender and running board design with the speedster. Surprisingly, the phaeton was priced $700 less than the speedster. The Radnor Hunt Concours in 2007 was the first time the car has been shown.
Sport Sedan
Coachwork: Dietrich
 
Packard stole the show at the 1933 Century of Progress exhibition in Chicago with a special Dietrich-designed Sport Sedan that came to be known as 'The Car of the Dome.' The design was such a success that it was offered in their 1934 custom catalog. This car is one of two known to have been sold in 1934, and the only one with polished aluminum beltline molding.
Sport Phaeton by Roxas
Coachwork: Roxas
Chassis Num: 902213
Engine Num: 902213
 
Sold for $352,000 at 2009 Gooding & Company.
The LeBaron bodied Sport Phaeton was the work of Alexis DeSaknoffsky, an individual responsible for many of the elegant coachbuilt bodies during this Era. Unfortunately, only four examples of the LeBaron Sport Phaeton were ever created during the period. Since then, there have been a few re-creations that have been commissioned and built atop of the Packard Twelve chassis.

This 1934 Packard is a re-creation of the Packard 1108 LeBaron style Sport Phaeton. It was the work of the craftsman Fran Roxas of Chicago, Illinois. It is currently finished in a light beige color scheme that is period-correct. The interior is deep-red leather and there is a new light-colored top and wire wheels. There are a number of period accessories such as the dual remotely controlled spotlights, Pilot Rays and wind wings. The engine is a 67-degree L-Head V-12 unit that displaces 446 cubic-inches and produces 160 horsepower with the help of a single two-barrel carburetor. There is a three-speed synchromesh gearbox and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes.

In 2009, this Model 1108 Twelve Sport Phaeton was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction held in Scottsdale, Arizona where it was estimated to sell for $400,000 - $500,000. The lot was sold for the sum of $352,000 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2009
Sedan Limousine
 
This 1934 Packard Twelve Model 1108 Limousine was originally owned by oil baron and philanthropist, John D. Rockefeller. The front compartment has leather trim, which was fairly common in chauffeur driven cars at a time when cloth interior fabrics were preferred over the more durable, but plebian leather. It has no division window between the driver and passenger compartment and is the only one built without side-mount spare tires.
Convertible Sedan
Coachwork: Dietrich
 
The Convertible Sedan body style was the most popular of the vee-windshield Packards as it offered the intimacy and comfort of a closed car with the top raised and the racy look of a true phaeton with the top down. This example was sold new to the Magnin family of upscale merchant fame, and it arrived at the 2009 Pebble Beach Concours wearing a 55-year-old restoration that has been lovingly freshened by its current owner.
Sport Phaeton
Coachwork: LeBaron
 
This 12-cylinder Sport Phaeton falls into the 11th Series of Packard car production of 1934. The Sport Phaeton, a dual cowl Phaeton an Twelve all-the-way, was another rare body style - style number 280 - and built on the model 1108 147-inch wheelbase chassis. Only four were produced and all were bodied by LeBaron.
Convertible Sedan
Coachwork: Dietrich
 
Penned by Ray Dietrich, the vee-windshield custom body series offered by Packard from 1932 through 1934. The original Dietrich design was slightly updated by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky for 1934, with a longer hood flowing over the cowl as seen on this magnificent example. Most Packard Twelves, which featured Packard's V12 engine, received factory bodies; only a handful had magnificent coachwork like this from Dietrich or LeBaron.

Most Packard Twelves came with a standard factory body but this example is one of a few carrying the custom Dietrich label. Penned by Ray Dietrich, the vee-windshield custom body series offered by Packard from 1932 through 1934. The original Dietrich design was slightly updated by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky for 1934, with a longer hood flowing over the cowl as seen on this magnificent example. Most Packard Twelves, which featured Packard's V12 engine, received factory bodies; only a handful had magnificent coachwork like this from Dietrich or LeBaron.

This vehicle features a longer hood flowing over the cowl, a V-type slanting windshield, a partition behind the driver's seat which lowers out of sight, a semi-disappearing top, and a longer and lower steering column with a special shifting lever and are among the custom Dietrich features.

The car is powered by a 455.5 cubic-inch V12 engine developing 175 horsepower, coupled to a synchromesh three-speed transmission capable of 93 mph or 0 to 60 mph in 20.4 seconds.
Convertible Sedan
Coachwork: Dietrich
 
Packard was the leading luxury marque at the start of the Classic era. It was one of the oldest car companies in America, with the first Packard built in 1899. The company began life as the Ohio Automobile Company based in Warren, Ohio and became the Packard Motor Car Company in 1902. In 1903 the company moved to Detroit.

Early luxury cars were powered predominately by huge displacement six cylinder engines until Cadillac introduced a V-8 in 1915. Packard responded in 1916 with the sensational Twin-Six which became the favorite of film stars, industrialists and heads of state. This engine was replaced by the smooth running straight eight in 1924.

In 1930, Cadillac again set off a second cylinder race by introducing a V-12 and a V-16. Packard responded with this new V-12 in 1932. In 1934 the V12's displacement was 445.5 cubic-inches developing 160 horsepower. Top speed was reportedly over 100 mph, although Packard advertising modestly claimed only 85 MPH. For 1934, Twelves also featured evolutionary styling changes that many consider the pinnacle of Packard design.

This 1934 1108 Series Packard is fitted with one-off Dietrich coachwork that includes jump seats and a divided window (the only Dietrich built with jump seats). It was lengthened by ten inches, a dip down body line and was built without a trunk.

The vehicle rides on a 147-inch wheelbase and weighs 5,505 pounds. It is powered by a 445.5 cubic-inch, V-12 engine developing 160 horsepower. The car sold new for $6,555.

The car was purchased by the current owner nine years ago and underwent a 3 year body-off restoration.
Convertible Victoria
Coachwork: Dietrich
Chassis Num: 902534
 
Sold for $440,000 at 2011 RM Auctions.
This Dietrich-designed, five-place Victoria features side-windows and an expansive blind C-pillar. The 1934 Packards were subtly modernized from the preceding year, with front fenders that now curved down almost to the front bumpers, which were wider, with stabilizing dampers fitted to the Twelves. Other changes involved trunks now integrated into the closed car bodies, higher seat backs and more luxurious upholstery, motor oil cooled by circulation through a core surrounded by radiator water, and an oil filter. Another new addition for the 1934 year was the first Packard radio option, neatly integrated into the new dashboard. Packard had been experimenting with radios since the late 1920s, when noted Los Angeles Packard dealer Earle C. Anthony led a delegation to talk to radio companies. As a result, 50 owners had radios installed in 1929, though no factory-approved radios were sold until 1932. By 1934, Packard had re-engineered its cars with shielded wiring, changes in coils to prevent interference, a larger air-cooled generator and a radio head integrated into the dashboard design.

The first owner of this vehicle was movie star Cesar Romero, who played The Cisco Kid in six Hollywood movies. He purchased the vehicle from Thompson Motors in Beverly Hills in late 1933. The next owner was sportscaster Bill Stern. The vehicle was frequently driven around the Stanford University stadium track during football game pep rallies. A San Francisco policeman named Marvin Zukor purchased the Packard from a young enthusiast who had rescued it from Stanford, then was drafted and sent to Korea.

Zukor was a founder of the Northern California Region of the Classic Car Club of America and would own the Packard for almost six decades. By the mid-1950s, it had been given a paint job and new upholstery, the engine was rebuilt, and Zukor drove it to the sixth Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, where he scored second place in the Packard Class.

Zukor exercised the vehicle regularly for the next five decades. A restoration was performed in the late 2000s in preparation for being shown at the 2008 Pebble Beach Concocurs d'Elegance. Upon completion, the car was shown at the 2007 Palo Alto Concours where it won the Meguiar's Award for best exterior paint finish. At the Pebble Beach Concours, it received a class award. It later was awarded Best in Class honors at the inaugural Marin Sonoma Concours in 2009.

In 2011, the car was offered for sale in Monterey, Ca. presented by RM Auctions. It was estimated to sell for $ 500,000-$600,000. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $ 440,000, including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2011
Sport Phaeton
Coachwork: LeBaron
Chassis Num: 1108-280
 
High bid of $310,000 at 2011 RM Auctions. (did not sell)
Packard built just three examples of the 1934 Packard Twelve with the Dual Cowl Sport Phaeton body by LeBaron. They sold for the sum of $7065. One of the three cars was owned by restorer Fran Roxas.

This example is a Fran Roxas recreation built to the same style of the original LeBaron Sport Phaeton. In 2011, it was offered for sale at the Hershey auction presented by RM Auctions. It was estimated to sell for $375,000 - $450,000. Bidding reached $310,000 but was not enough to satisfy the vehicle's reserve. It would leave the auction unsold.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2011
Stationart Coupe
Coachwork: Dietrich
 
The distinctive custom coachwork of the Two-Place Dietrich Coupe was offered by many luxury car dealers of the day. This example is nearly identical in appearance to the 1932 Lincoln Dietrich Coupe.

For 1934, Packard produced just four examples of the Two-Place Dietrich Coupe. It had a selling price of $6,808 and it rode on a 147-inch platform.
Convertible Victoria
Coachwork: Dietrich
Chassis Num: 1108-15
 
High bid of $22,200,000 at 2012 RM Auctions. (did not sell)
The Raymond Dietrich bodied Packards were both influential and stunning. One of the highlights was the Convertible Victoria, with its blind quarters giving them an unsurpassed elegance. Unlike the convertible coupe, the car provided far more versatility with luxurious accommodations for up to four. The bodystyle was available from 1932 through 1934. They were unique in many respects, offering special 'wind-split' trim, a redesigned dash intended to accommodate an optional built-in radio and several chassis enhancements.

For 1934, the hood was extended back over the cowl to the base of the windshield in an unbroken line from the radiator to the main body. This resulted in a much longer hood than that of the earlier cars. The vent doors were curved, as were the leading edges of the doors. Exact numbers are not known, but it is believed that as few as three and as many as four or five Style 4072 Dietrich Convertible Victorias may have been built on the Packard Model 1008 chassis. When new, pricing was $6,080. Only three examples are known to exist today.

In 1948, this example was purchased in Maryland by Robert Wellcome of Westchester, New York. He had purchased it from a local bookmaker, who had purchased the car from a local dentist. The dentist had purchased the car for his daughter but found it too big for her to handle. At that time, he was told that the car was original sold in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area.

Mr. Wellcome kept the car for nine years and reluctantly sold it to Ted Fuller. Mr Fuller kept the car for 16 years before selling it to Frank McGowan on August 29, 1973.

Mr. McGowan sold the car to John Wheatley. He restored the car during the late-1970s or early 1980s and later passed it on to Jerry J. Moore in 1984. It remained with Mr. Moore until 1996, when it was acquired by Dr. Joseph Murphy. It joined the Otis Chandler Collection in Oxnard, California in 1998, where it remained on display for four years before Dave Kane of Bernardsville, New Jersey acquired it in 2002.

Joseph Cassini III acquired the Convertible Victoria during the summer of 2004. A navy blue convertible top was later fitted by RM Auto Restoration. The current owner acquired the car in 2006, and fitted a set of chrome wheels and new wide whitewall tires. Also, the electrical system has been re-wired.

In 2011, the car was on display at the Concours d'Elegance of America at St. John's, where it was awarded Best in Class in the Classic Era Open 1934-1942 category.

The car is powered by a modified L-head V-12 engine that offers 160 horsepower. There is a three-speed selective synchromesh manual gearbox with vacuum-assisted clutch. There is shaft drive with hypoid rear axle and four-wheel vacuum-assisted mechanical drum brakes.

In 2012, the car was offered for sale at the Amelia Island, Florida auction presented by RM Auctions. The car was sold for $2,200,000 inclusive of buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2012
Sport Sedan
Coachwork: Dietrich
 
This Packard 1008 Sport Sedan was created specifically to be displayed at the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago, A Century of Progress, which opened in May. It was a Ray Dietrich-style formal sedan modified to present 'The highest expression of the industry that has civilized the world.' It was a handsome blending of ingredients from Dietrich, Alexis de Sakhnoffsky, and Packard's chief designer, Edward Macauley. The car started out as a 1933 Tenth Series Sport Sedan, updated at the fair with 1934 Eleventh Series bumper caps and forward-extended front fenders to mimic the new models that were being introduced in the fall. The use of a rear-mounted spare obviated side-mounts, revealing the beautifully swept fenders. An elongated 'false hood' and slim spears on the hood vent doors added to the impression of length afforded by the 147-inch wheelbase. Inside it featured an interior luxuriously appointed with gold plating, burled Carpathian elm wood trim, and a rear compartment lavished with magazine rack, makeup mirror, smoking set, writing desk, radio speaker, divider window, and a bar replete with two gold flasks with matching cups.

The end result was so spectacular that a jury of artists selected this car to be taken from the Packard display and placed under the central suspended dome of the Travel & Transport building as the finest representation of the advancement of the automobile at that point in time - quite an honor for Packard, who lost no time in capitalizing by calling it 'The Car of the Dome.' Following the close of the Fair in November of 1933, it was returned to the factory to finish being upgraded to 1934 Packard Twelve specifications, including its serial numbers (its hood handles are the only remaining features of the 1933 body). The car was extensively toured throughout the northeast, and then sold to its first owner in April 1934, Thomas M. Flanaghan, Wyomissing Park, Pennsylvania through the Jones & Manske dealer in Reading. At $12,000, it was the most expensive new car ever sold by Packard throughout its history. It is one of three surviving Dietrich Sport Sedans of the four produced.
Runabout Speedster
Coachwork: LeBaron
Chassis Num: 1106-12
 
This Packard 1108 Runabout Speedster has a unique body by LeBaron. The car gives the illusion of motion even at a standstill. There are torpedo fenders and a boat-tail rear-end. The long front end conceals a 7.3-liter twelve-cylinder engine that produces an impressive 160 horsepower. The long hood sweeps over the cowl, creating the illusion that the vehicle is larger in length than one would expect.

This design was created by Ed Macauley who was Packard's design chief. Design influences from Alexis de Sakhnoffsky, a design consultant since 1932, are also apparent.

There were just 960 examples of the 12-cylinder Packard constructed in 1934. Five were give LeBaron Sport Phaeton bodies.

This 1934 Packard 1108 Runabout Speedster with coachwork by LeBaron was on display at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. It is finished in a blue paint scheme and was delivered on 4-16-1935.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2007
Sedan Limousine
Chassis Num: 735-182
Engine Num: 902510
 
Sold for $66,000 at 2013 RM Auctions.
The Packard Motor Company enjoyed a booming export business, including in Canada. By the mid-1930s, new Packard's were being sent across the Detroit River into Windsor, Ontario, in knocked-down form. The cars were then assembled by the Packard Motor Car Company Ontario in Windsor, allowing them to be badged as 'Made in Canada' and sold to Canadian buyers free of hefty taxes.

Most of the Packard's 'Made in Canada' were the One Twenty models introduced in 1935. A few of the more 'elite' Packard models were also sent to Canada, including this Seven-Passenger Limousine, style number 735. It has a divider window and Packard's longest 11series chassis, the 147-inch wheelbase 1108.

This particular car is one of only two of those survivors that were assembled in Canada.

The history of this Packard has been traced back to Lyall Trenholm, of Arva, Ontario. He later sold it to Ken McGee and Ted MacPhail of Dorchester. It was placed into storage in 1969 and was not sold out of Canada until 2008, when it was acquired by a California resident.

Since the car has been in storage for most of its life, it remains in original, patinated condition, with paint that is original all the way down to the pinstripes; the front fenders have been repainted. All exterior trim is complete, and the car has only surface rust, with no body damage and only one small crack in a side window. The dashboard gauges are original and still functional behind unbroken original glass. The car rides on Packard's wooden artillery wheels which have been given new tires. The odometer shows just 64,000 miles.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2013
Convertible Victoria
Coachwork: Dietrich
Chassis Num: 1108-15
 
High bid of $22,200,000 at 2012 RM Auctions. (did not sell)
In 1934 Packard offered three different chassis for the 11th series Packard Twelve, and the 1108 was the longest. This Convertible Victoria is one of the most desirable of Raymond Dietrich-designed body styles. The car provides luxury accommodation for up to four passengers, with special interior trim, a redesigned dash for an optional built-in radio and several chassis enhancements. Although the style was offered from 1932 through 1934, the 1934 models are the most sought after today. This well-known car was once in the Otis Chandler Collection in Oxnard, California. It is one of three Convertible Victorias remaining in the world and has recently been restored.
The Packard Twelve was produced from 1933 to 1939 with over 35,000 examples produced. It is considered by many to be one of the finest automobiles produced by Packard and one of the most significant creations of the classic car era. The long and flowing front hood hid a 445 cubic-inch side-valve twelve cylinder engine that was refined, powerful, smooth, and quiet.

The engine was originally destined for a front wheel drive project which eventually proved to have weaknesses. That and the anticipated development cost were too much to be practical so Packard decided to scrap the idea. Cadillac had introduced their 16-cylinder engine and other marques such as Pierce-Arrow were improving the performance of their offerings. Packard was feeling the pressure and decided to place the engine into the Deluxe Eight Chassis and dubbed it the Twin Six. The name was in honor of Packard's achievement fifteen years earlier when the introduced their first 12-cylinder engine. By 1933 the name was changed to Twelve to be inline with the rest of the Packard models.

Most of the Packard production Twelve's received factory bodies. Only a handful received custom coachwork by such greats as LeBaron and Dietrich.

In 1935 Packard introduced more horsepower and mechanical improvements. The suspension became more plush and comfortable while the steering became easier to operate. The cars were designed and built as one unit including the fenders, running boards, hood and body.

1936 the final year for 17 inch wire wheels and the double blade bumpers with hydraulic dampers.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008
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3-35 Fourth Series
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645
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845
Caribbean
Cavalier
Clipper
Custom Eight
Eight
Four Hundred
Model 18
Model 30
Model F
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Patrician
Six
Super Deluxe
Twelve

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