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 ManufacturersArrow PictureFerrariArrow Picture250 GT California (1960 - 1963)Arrow Picture1961 Ferrari 250 GT California 
1962 250 GT California Image Right
 

1961 Ferrari 250 GT California news, pictures, specifications, and information

SWB Spyder
Chassis Num: 3099 GT
Engine Num: 168/61
Gearbox Num: 539/61
 
The 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder with chassis number 3099GT is a left hand drive vehicle. It is constructed of steel with covered headlights and a competition engine.

It is just 32 of just 55 Short Wheelbase California Spyders built. It was shipped by Ferrari to Luigi Chinetti Motors for the Ferrari display stand at the 1962 New York Auto Show. After the show, it was shipped to Ferrari Representatives of California and sold to the original owner. The car remained in California and was purchased by Charles Betz in 1973, who kept the car in storage until commencing a meticulous restoration in 2002. This particular California Spyder came from the factory with the desirable covered headlights and leather on nearly every interior surface, most likely due to its New York Show car status. The current owner purchased the car from Charles Betz in 2008.

In 2004 it was entered into the FCA International Concours in Monterey where it was entered by Charles Betz and Fred Peters. It was awarded a Silver award.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2010
SWB Spyder
Chassis Num: 2561 GT
 
This short wheelbase California Spyder, chassis number 2561 is the 19th of 55 built. The car was originally sold in Paris at Franco-Brittannic Autos. This car was ordered with many desirable options by Nano Da Silva Ramos, which included covered headlights and the competition option package which was a competition engine, lightweight 'ribbed' gearbox and an 8x32 rear axle ratio with limited slip. The car was delivered with a special order Alfa Romeo color called Blue Inverno Giulietta Sprint and red leather. The car also came with a radio, hardtop and seat belts. This car spent its life in Europe until 2002.

Restoration was completed in 2003, and the current owner has put 14,556 km on it since.

The 250 GT passo corto (short wheelbase, or SWB, of 2400 mm) Spyder California debuted at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1960, and a total of 55 of them were built before production ended in February 1963. A rare factory original hardtop came with this SWB Spyder California when new. The car (serial number 2561 GT) went through an extensive restoration in 2004 and 2005 and won several major Concours awards afterwards, including the prestigious Louis Vuitton Classic Concours Award in 2006.

The 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder with chassis number 2561GT is a left hand drive vehicle constructed of steel and features covered headlights and a competition engine. It was also given a limited slip differential, hardtop, seat belts, and a radio. It has chassis tipo 539, engine tipo 168, and gearbox tipo 539.

In 1961 it was purchased by Jo Setton. In 1963 it was owned by Jean-Pierre Chabert. In 1966 it was sold to Jean Redelle. In 1972 it was purchased by Charles Robert who later sold it to Jacques Bajol. Bajol entered the vehicle into the Ferrari Days at Modena bearing number 106.

In 1988 the car was sold to Henri Chambon. In 2002 it attended the Cavallino Classic under its latest owner, Peter S. Kalikow of New York.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2009
SWB Spyder
Chassis Num: 2467GT
Engine Num: 168
Gearbox Num: 539
 
Ferrari 250 GT SWB (Short Wheelbase) California Spyder with chassis number 2467GT was constructed by April 24th of 1961. It is the 15th constructed and is a left hand vehicle. It is constructed of steel with covered headlights and has a 9.3:1 compressions ratio. It was first owned (sold) by Chinetti Motors of the US. It has been shown at the 2002 Ferrari Car Club of America Concours at Lake Lanier Island where it was awarded a Third in Class. It is currently owned by Richard Vento of California who has show it at the 2004 FCA International Concours in Monterey and the Cavallino Concours.
By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2007
The 250 GT SWB was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti. It was designed for the race track and the road. This two-seater had an aggressive stance and a wheel base 8 inches shorter than the LWB edition. The street versions were called 'Lusso' (luxury) and contained a Colombo V-12 producing as much as 280 BHP and propelled the vehicle to a top speed of about 150 mph. Modifications had been made to the engine to make it easier to work on during competition events. For example the spark plugs were moved to make them more accessible. The competition models had their body entirely made of the weight-saving metal aluminum. Also, plastic side windows were used to help keep the weight to a minimum. By shortening the wheel base, the chassis became more solid and the vehicle more agile.

The Berlinetta (litle coupe) Lusso (luxury), more commonly known as the 250 GT/L was also designed by Pininfarina and debuted at the 1962 Paris show.

There were vents located under the front head lights. These were used to cool the disc brakes. There were also vents behind each wheel which served the same purpose.
SWB Spyder
Chassis Num: 3059GT
 
Ferrari began building the 250 GT SWB California Spyder in 1960 and would continue until early 1963, with production totaling 54 units. The design was by Scaglietti and was close to the long wheelbase 'TdF' Berlinetta but on a shorter wheelbase. These were available in a street version in steel or as a competition version in alloy. Movie stars who owned the 250 GT SWB Spyder included James Coburn, Brigitte Bardot, Roger Vadim and Barbara Hershey. The majority were the covered headlight version and all were bodied by Scaglietti.

This example, chassis number 3059GT, was completed in November 1961. It has the covered headlights and steel body. It was once owned by Sir Anthony Bamford in the United Kingdom.
Production of the 250 Series began in 1954 and continued on through the early part of the 1960's. There were numerous variations of the 250 and would ultimately become Ferrari's most successful line of vehicles to date. The 250 is also recognized as the first Ferrari to ever receive disc brakes. This did not take place until the end of the 1950's. Also, the 250 was the first four-seater.

Ferrari's were custom built cars. They were not mass-produced. Ferrari provided the engine and chassis while Italian coach builders provided the body. This meant the specifications varied. Engines also varied in horsepower rating, torque, and displacement. This was no different for the 250 GT which saw many different variations in body style and body types.

Ferrari built the road-going Ferrari's to fuel his passion for racing. Many of the vehicles he built for the road had a competition model. That is, a modified version of the road-going model. An example of this was the 1959 short-wheel base (SWB) Berlinetta (Berlinetta which means coupe) and given an aluminum body. It was debuted in October 1959 at the Paris Salon. GT cars were road-legal vehicles that could also be taken to the track and compete without the need for modifications. Although this was their purpose, Ferrari realized that many customers would not race their vehicle, but rather wanted the power and performance that sports cars offered. To comply, Ferrari built these cars to be powerful and luxurious. The vehicles could still be run on the track, mostly on requiring the adoption of stickers and complying with any safety requirements.

The 250 road-going vehicles mostly shared two wheelbase sizes, a 2400 mm and 2600 mm. The 2400 wheelbase were referred to as the SWB (Short wheel base) while the other was the LWB (long wheel base).

The base engine was a Colombo 60-degree, single-over-head cam, 'vee' type 12-cylinder, with aluminum alloy block and heads, and cast-iron cylinder liners. The displacement was 180 cubic inch (2953 cc). Horsepower production was around 220-260. The front suspension was independent with double wishbones and coil springs. The rear suspension was a live axle.

The first 250 introduced was the 250S and available in either berlinetta or spider configuration. Introduced in 1952, they were powered by a 3-liter Colombo engine producing about 230 horsepower.

At the 1953 Paris Motor Show, Ferrari introduced the 250 Europa and Export. These were the only models in the series that were powered by a Lampredi v-12 engine also seen in Formula 1. The 250 Export had a 2400 MM wheelbase, similar tot he 250 MM. The 250 Europa had a larger, 2800 mm wheelbase which allowed more interior room. During their short production lifespan, only 18 examples were produced. Pininfarina and Vignale were tasked with creating the coachwork.

In 1954 four specialty built 250 Monza were built for racing. They shared many similarities with the 750 Monza's, but were equipped with the 3-liter Colombo engine.

At the 1957 Geneva auto show, Ferrari displayed their 250 GT Cabriolet. Coachwork was courtesy of Pininfarina; the wheelbase was 2600 mm in size. In 1959 the second in the 250 GT Cabriolet series production began after only 36 examples being produced.

From 1957 through 1959 Ferrari produced the 250 GT Berlinetta 'Tour de France' (TdF). The name had been given for the 10-day automobile race. Originally the engine produced 240 horsepower but was later modified to 260 horsepower. Carrozzeria Scaglietti was responsible for creating the bodies based on Pinin Farina's design.

Scaglietti was responsible for constructing the 1957 250 GT California Spyder. These sat atop a long, 2600 mm chassis and aluminum was used throughout the body in efforts to reduce the overall weight. In total, around 45 examples were created before they were replaced by the SWB version in 1960.

There were 250 examples of the 250 GT Berlinetta SWB produced. Production began in 1959 and used the shortened, sportier wheelbase. Giotto Bizzarrini, Carlo Chiti, and Mauro Forghieri were responsible for the development. Some were built for racing while others were meant for daily transportation. Horsepower ranged from 240 to 280. Steel or aluminum bodies were used. The steel bodies were suited for the road-going vehicles, also known as Lusso. The racing trim vehicles were powerful and had low weight. They were vary competitive and are regarded as the most important GT racers of its time. In 1961 the SWB Berlinetta captured the GT class of the Constructor's Championship.

In 1960 a Scaglietti 250 GT Spyder California SWB was shown at the Geneva Motor Show. Built as a replacement for the LWB and based on the 250 GT SWB, around 55 examples were produced.

The Ferrari 250TR was produced from 1957 through 1958 during which only 19 examples were created. The 'pontoon' fender body was designed by Scaglietti and the power was supplied through a Colombo 12-cylinder engine mounted at a sixty-degree angle and outfitted with six Weber 38 DCN carburetors. Power was sent to the rear wheels via a four-speed manual gearbox. With 300 horsepower, the 800 kg vehicle was able to achieve a 168 mph top speed. From 1958 through 1961, the 250 TR was entered in 19 championship races where they emerged victorious ten times.

The 250 in 250 TR represented the unitary displacement while the TR was an acronym meaning Testa Rossa. Testa Rossa translates to 'red head' which referred to the color of the engine's cylinder head.

The 250 TR series was built to capture the world championship which was experience questionable times. During the 1955 24 Hours of Lemans a fatal accident occurred and the Commissione Sportiva Internazionale (CSI) began investigating ways to make the sport safer for the drivers and the spectators. Their efforts were escalated in 1967 when another fatal accident occurred at the 1957 Mille Miglia. The committee decided upon a displacement limit but they were in disagreement on the size; the proposed figures ranged from 3 to around 3.5 liters.

1958 was the introductory year for the new regulations, which had been announced during the later part of 1957. Ferrari had been building, testing, and racing the 250 GT which had performed well during the 1957 Mille Miglia. The Colombo V12 260 horsepower engine received a larger bore, camshaft, and other improvements resulting in a 3.1 liter displacement and 320 horsepower. Testing continued throughout the 1957 season in both body configuration and mechanical components.

Ferrari had anticipated the new engine size regulations and thus had been sufficiently prepared to capture the world championship. Due to the potential of negative publicity caused by the fatal accidents, other manufacturers, such as Aston Martin, Lotus, Cooper and Jaguar, were hesitant to continue racing. Ferrari believed their closest competitor would be the powerful and technologically advanced Maserati 450 S which featured a quad-cam eight-cylinder engine.

Ferrari quickly began capturing victories during the 1958 season. The 250 TR was a solid vehicle thanks to the preparation and testing. The steel tubular ladder frame was of traditional Ferrari construction; a DeDion rear axle was used on the works racers. Customer cars were outfitted with a live axle. Drum brakes were placed on all four corners of the car. The engine had been modified to comply with regulations and to fit in the engine bay. In reality, the vehicle was an outdated car having only the benefit of proper planning and proven technology. Most cars featured disc brakes which provided superior stopping power. The Colombo engine dated back to the beginning of Ferrari and was antiquated in comparison to the modern power-plants.

Nearing the close of the 1958 season, the competition began to rise. Aston Martin had a lethal combination, a 3 liter DBR1 racer and Stirling Moss as the driver. Even though the Aston Martins did score a victory at Nurburgring 1000 KM, Ferrari was able to capture the World Championship. The legendary Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien easily capture a third victory for Ferrari at the grueling 24 Hours of Lemans. The 250 TR works cars were referred to as TR58, to distinguish them from the customer TRs.

For the 1959 season, the vehicles received slight modifications which made the vehicle lighter and more powerful. The big news was the use of Dunlop disc brakes. The engine received coil valve springs and the horsepower increased slightly to 306. A Colotti designed five speed gearbox replaced the four-speed unit. Pininfarina was tasked with designing a new body and the construction was handled by Fantuzzi. As a result of the improvements, the name was changed to TR59. At their inaugural race, the TR59 finished first and second. This streak did not last and at the end of the season, it was Aston Martin who emerged as the world champion. The TR59 was plagued with reliability issues mostly due to the gearbox. The vehicles were forced to retire early from races, including Le Mans.

For the 1960 season, the TR was modified slightly to comply with new regulations and to rectify the transmission issues. These vehicles are commonly referred to as the TR59/60. Aston Martin had withdrawn from the championship which left no factory opposition for Ferrari. Porsche and Maserati provided competition, especially at Targa Florio and the Nurburgring 1000 km where they scored victories. At Le Mans, Ferrari finished first and second and captured the word championship, beating Porsche by only four points.

For the 1961 season, Ferrari introduced the mid-engined 246 SP. The TRI61 was given a new spaceframe chassis and was able to capture victories at Sebring 12 Hours and Le Mans. With victories between the 246 SP and the TRI61, Ferrari once again captured the world championship.

The CSI implemented stricter rules for the 1962 season which meant the TR was unable to score points for the factory. It was still allowed to race for the overall victory.

By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2007
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166
166 F2
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246
250 GT
250 Monza
250 Testarossa
275
288
308
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328
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333 SP
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342 America
348
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410 S
456
458
500 F2
500 Superfast
500 TR
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512 BB/LM
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612 Scaglietti
625
California
Dino
Enzo
F12berlinetta
F355
F40
F430
F430 GTC
F50
FF
LaFerrari
Mondial
Mondial 500
Testarossa
Type 340

1962 250 GT California Image Right
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