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Image Left 1940 Custom Super 8 180
 

1941 Packard Super 8 180 news, pictures, specifications, and information

Touring Sedan
 
This is the 226th of 930 four-door Touring Sedans built by Packards in 1941. It had a base price of $2,912, exclusive of options, when a Ford Deluxe sedan had a base price of $800. There were 110 options available, and the most expensive was air conditioning, at $1,085. The compressor had no clutch, so the drive belt had to be removed to turn it off. This example was purchased very early by the Harrah Auto Collection in Reno because it was one of the first vehicles to have air conditioning in this country. At the Harrah auction in 1981, this car was sold to a collector who wanted to dismantle it for parts for his 1941 Packard LeBaron Sedan. He eventually decided that it was too good to dismantle, and sold it to the current owner in 1999. Restoration was completed in 2007. It still has the Harrah Museum nomenclature plate on the bumper bracket.
Convertible Limousine Rollson
Coachwork: Rollson
 
This one-off design by Rollson was ordered by E. Parmalee Prentiss of Pocantico Hills, New York, best known as the husband of the daughter of John D. Rockefeller. As on all of the cars owned by Prentiss, no manufacturer's badging was permitted. Amazingly, this car has never been restored, maintained by the Rockefeller and The Harrah Collections before its current careful owner.
Convertible Victoria
Designer: Howard Darrin
Chassis Num: CD501695
 
Sold for $259,600 at 2004 RM Auctions.
Sold for $247,500 at 2010 RM Auctions.
In 1937 Howard 'Dutch' Darrin of Hollywood, CA began designing this radical coachwork known for its chrome frame windshield and cut-down doors. The Darrin attracted celebrity owners such as Clark Gable, Tyrone Power, Errol Flynn, Rosalind Russell, Constance Bennett, Gene Krupa, Ann Sheridan, Ruby Keller (Mrs. Al Jolson) and Preston Foster. In early 1939 coachwork production was moved to the Central Body Co. in Connersville, IN and in May 1941 production was moved to Sayers & Scoville Co. (Hess & Eisenhardt), Cincinnati, Oh. The production in 1941 was 35 Darrins, each with a approximate cost of $5,000. The engine is a 356 cubic-inch 160 horsepower straight-eight. This Darrin is currently on display at Citizens Motorcar Company - America's Packard Museum in Dayton, Ohio.

There were Packards, and then there were Darrin Packards. Howard 'Dutch' Darrin has been doing custom coachwork on Packards since the early 1920's, but his real 'star' came when he set up shop in Hollywood, customizing Packard coupes into dazzling Convertible Victorias with cut-down doors, a low hood line, and a padded dash. A total of 14 were built in Hollywood through 1939, two on the Super Eight chassis, and the rest on the One-Twenty chassis.

Darrin represented his masterpieces to Packard dealers, who then lobbied the company to offer these stunning cars as 'catalogue customs' which it did through 1942. Darrin built the cars in Cornersville, Indiana in 1940 and Packard moved production to Hess & Eisenhardt, in Cincinnati, in 1941 and 1942. About 150 Darrins were built, in all, mostly as Convertible Victorias. A few Sedans and Convertible Sedans were built, as well as one Sedanca.

This Convertible Victoria, finished in Packard Cream, is in the 'normal' configuration without either running boards or sidemounts. It is estimated there were only 50 Darrin Convertible Victoria's built in 1940 and only 35 in 1941. It has a 160 horsepower, 356 cubic-inch engine and dual-down draft carburetors. There is an AM radio, 20 gallon fuel tank, 5-gallon radiator capacity and 7.00 x 16 white wall tires. Prices started at $4,550 when introduced in September of 1940 and increased to $4,595 in June of 1941.
LeBaron Touring Limousine
Coachwork: LeBaron
 
This car was purchased new by Mrs. Elizabeth G. Packard on May 3, 1941 at Hause Garage located in Jamestown, New York. Mrs. Packard requested body and interior custom alterations that would have added to this base price. It was primarily used in Lakewood, New York and Warren, Ohio until Mrs. Packard's death in 1960.

Source - National Packard Museum
All-Weather Cabriolet
Coachwork: Rollson
 
This 1941 Packard All Weather (AW) Cabriolet is the only example of this motor car known to exist. The exact number produced is unknown.

This 4,075 pound car, riding on a 138-inch wheelbase, is powered by a 356 cubic-inch inline-eight producing 160 horsepower. New, this car sold for $4,695, while a Packard standard 4-door sedan sold for $1,076. This car was a definite part of the smart, urban scene as top hats and sequins, and was the favorite formal transportation of a discriminating society.

The car has recently completed a three-year restoration.
Convertible Victoria
Designer: Howard Darrin
 
This 1941 Packard Darrin was custom built by Howard 'Dutch' Darrin by modifying Packard Convertibles. Darrin lowered doorlines and windshields and extended the hood. It has rear opening doors, rather than suicide doors common on the 1939-1940 models and authentic Packard Ribbed Flooring.

Only 35 of the 1941 cars were produced and as of 1996 only 11 are left. This car was restored in 1994. The original selling price was $4,685.
Convertible Victoria
Coachwork: Bohman & Schwartz
 
This Bohman & Schwartz Convertible Victoria is a stunning design that is somewhat reminiscent of the Packard Darrin Victoria, yet it is distinctive in many ways. The V-windshield has a strikingly severe rake to it, while the trailing edge of the front fender extends gracefully into the door instead of ending before the door. A 10-inch longer wheelbase than the Darrin Victoria, a lack of running boards and the bold chrome spear on the body side combine to make a beautiful, long, low, truly elegant automobile of distinction.

This car was purchased new in California by the auto of racing personality Phil Hill. Phil later acquired the car and used it in the 1950s to tow his Ferrari to races up and down the West Coast. It is generally accepted that this is one of two surviving Bohman & Schwartz Convertible Victorias, of at least three originally built.
Convertible Victoria Darrin
Coachwork: Darrin
Chassis Num: 14292012
 
Sold for $203,500 at 2011 RM Auctions.
This Packard Darrin Convertible Victoria was delivered on January 27th of 1951 through the Meador Motor Company in Houston, Texas. It was purchased by Harry Rinker in the late 1960s from collector Tom Lester. A professional restoration was completed in the late 1970s. This is the twelfth of a believed 35 Darrin Convertible Victorias built for 1941. It is one of fewer 20 estimated survivors. Power is from a 365 cubic-inch, L-head inline engine offering 160 horsepower. There are four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes and a three-speed manual transmission.

In 2011, the car was offered for sale in Monterey, Ca. presented by RM Auctions. It was estimated to sell for $225,000-$300,000 and offered without reserve. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $203,500, including buyer's premium.
LeBaron Touring Limousine
Coachwork: LeBaron
Chassis Num: 14202002
 
Sold for $165,000 at 2011 Gooding & Company.
Packard produced approximately 930 examples of the Senior Packards in 1941, and approximately 50 such examples were the LeBaron Touring Limousine. The semi-custom was built on Packard's longest wheelbase of 1941 and, at $5,595, was the most expensive model available that year.

It is believed that this limousine is the one that was assigned to the White House between 1941 and 1947, serving as transportation for Presidents Roosevelt and Truman. After its presidential duties were performed, it was acquired by Governor Thomas Dewey of New York state, who used the limousine in his campaign for president against incumbent Harry Truman.

In April of 1985, the car was acquired by Dr. Charles Blackman of Madison, Indiana. In 1991, it was sold to Bill Mitchell. In 2006, it was sold to an individual who had a significant collection in Houston, Texas.

In 2011, the car was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction held in Pebble Beach, CA. It was estimated to sell for $150,000-$225,000. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $165,000 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2011
Convertible Victoria
Designer: Howard Darrin
 
This Darrin-designed convertible is one of just 35 built in 1941 at a retail price of $4,595. This last iteration of Darrin's famed cut-down door style is felt by many to be the most successful because the body stability issues of earlier types were no longer present. Packard's overdrive-equipped 356 cubic-inch straight eight provided the lucky owner with a car that was as pleasing to drive as it was to the eye.
Sport Brougham
Coachwork: LeBaron
 
In 1941 Packard offered a small line of custom bodies carrying the LeBaron nameplate, of which this Sport Sedan is one. By this point LeBaron was a part of the Briggs Body Co. and these were created in the custom section of Briggs. As a cost-cutting effort, Packard often forced outside body builders to use stock body components. A careful eye will find the rear window and trunk configuration of a stock 1941 Packard coupe cleverly used in this body.
Sport Brougham
Coachwork: LeBaron
Chassis Num: 14522002
Engine Num: C501634A
 
Sold for $176,000 at 2013 Gooding & Company.
LeBaron made just 99 examples of the Sport Brougham that made its debut in 1941 on the 138-inch wheelbase. These were essentially a replacement for the outgoing Club Sedan. This particular example is only the second example produced of this custom-built body style. It was ordered new by Norwegian figure skating champion and actress Sonja Henie. It was sold on November 1st of 1940 by the Earle C. Anthony dealership in Los Angeles.

After Ms. Heine's ownership, this car passed to at least one other caretaker before Richard L. Roach, acquired it in the early 2000s. The Packard was purchased soon thereafter by fellow AACA member Francis Childs of Jupiter, Florida, who immediately began an extensive frame-off restoration. The work took nearly three years to complete at a cost exceeding $250,000.

After the restoration work was completed in late 2008, this Super-8 One-Eighty was exhibited at the Lake Mirror Classic in Lakeland, Florida in October 2009. It was awarded with a Best of Show honorable mention. Following a Second in Class award at the Boca Raton Concours d'Elegance in February 2010, the Packard was shown at the AACA's national meet in Homestead, Florida, where it won a First Junior Award. It was later shown at the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance.

A year later it earned a 100-point score and a Primary Division win at the CCCA meeting in Palm Beach, Florida, in January of 2011. Two months later, it earned a Senior 1st place badge at the AACA 2011 national winter meet. In early 2012, this Sport Brougham was acquired by its current owner.

The car is finished in Balboa Blue paint with a broadcloth upholstery interior. It has a 3-speed manual gearbox, 4-wheel hydraulic drum brakes, and a 356 CID L-Head 8-cylidner engine.

In 2013, the vehicle was offered for sale at Gooding & Company's Scottsdale, Arizona auction. It was estimated to sell for $100,000 - $150,000 and offered without reserve. As bidding came to a close, it had been sold for the sum of $176,000 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2013
Sport Brougham
Coachwork: LeBaron
 
In 1941, the LeBaron Company was commissioned to build about 100 custom bodies for Packard. Standard on the Packard 180 series were power windows, overdrive and deluxe interior appointments. The 180 series vehicles were powered by a 356 cubic-inch straight eight engine with 160 horsepower. It rode on a 138-inch wheelbase and weighs 4,450 pounds.

This Packard was delivered to Morristown, New Jersey, on February 20th of 1941. Options included a radio, heater, backup lights, bumper guard over riders and rare factory air-conditioning.

This car was listed at nearly $4,800 when compared to a new Cadillac that was listed at $2,900.
The Packard One Eighty was first introduced in 1940 and was Packard's new top-of-the-line vehicle. It served as a replacement for the company's V12 powered vehicle. The Packard 180 was given a eight-cylinder 356 cubic-inch engine that produced an astonishing 160 horsepower. Packard proudly claimed that it was the most powerful eight cylinder engine on the market.

Though most of the other series, the 110, 120, 160, and 180, were similar in body styling in 1940, the 180 was segregated by its exquisite interior detailing, and lush carpets and fabrics. Options included a heater/defroster, air conditioning, radio, fender skirts, backup lights and more.

Styling changed only slightly during its production lifespan, lasting until 1942 when World War II brought an end to civilian automobile production. Famous coachbuilders, such as Darrin and LeBaron were given the opportunity to build their interpretation of the automobile on this accommodating chassis. These were constructed in limited numbers and built to suite the individual customers needs, desires, and specifications.

Standard on the 180 Series were power windows, overdrive, and deluxe interior appointments. The 180 Series was powered by a 356-cubic inch straight-eight, with 160 hp, and rode on a 138-inch wheelbase.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2009
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Image Left 1940 Custom Super 8 180
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