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Image Left 1964 XKE E-Type1966 XKE E-Type Image Right
 

Image credits: © Jaguar.

1965 Jaguar XKE E-Type news, pictures, specifications, and information

The XKE was launched in 1961 as replacement to the XK-100 series. Based on a design by Jaguar founder, Sir William Lyons and aerodynamic stylist, Malcolm Sayer, it created a sensation at automobile shows all over the world. It was also heraided for its racecar derived monocoque chassis and sporty interior.
Roadster
Chassis Num: 1E10361
Engine Num: 7E1931-9
 
Sold for $87,500 at 2006 RM Auctions.
The 1965 Jaguar Series I 4.2 E-Type Roadster finished in Golden sand with a black interior was offered for sale at the 2006 RM Auction in Monterey, CA where it was expected to sell between $100,000-$125,000. It is powered by a 4235-cc double overhead camshaft six-cylinder engine capable of producing 265 horsepower. There are four-wheel disc brakes and a four-speed manual gearbox. It is a matching numbers California original car that has been painstakingly maintained and recently undergone a full restoration. The mechanical components were rebuilt, replaced, or serviced as needed. At the conclusion of the auction the vehicle was sold for $87,500.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2006
Coupe
Chassis Num: 1E30493
 
Sold for $88,000 at 2011 RM Auctions.
The Jaguar E-Type was introduced at Geneva in 1961 and produced through mid-1974. The Series I cars had an enlarged 4.2-liter engine, fully-synchronized four-speed gearbox and adjustable bucket seats, combined with the early-style covered headlights and toggle-type switchgear.

The form of the car would be retained for 1965 with no external changes. The years that followed, the E-Type would conform to the onslaught of safety and emission regulations that altered both the appearance and performance. Thus, the Series I cars - built from 1961 to 1966 - are highly prized and sought after in modern times.

This car was once owned by Bob Leppan, the co-owner of Detroit Triumph during the 1960s. Leppan was also the driver of the Alex Tremulus-designed 'Gyronaut X1' Bonneville streamliner, and set the US motorcycle speed record at 245.667 mph in 1966. In 1970, Leppan also joined the '200 mph Crash Club' when he lost control of the Gyronaut at over 270 mph due to front-suspension failure.

Currently, the E-Type shows around 17,000 original miles and is equipped with chrome wire wheels, has new tires, and the original AM/FM radio.

In 2011, the car was offered for sale at RM Auctions' Arizona sale where it was estimated to sell for $80,000 - $100,000 and offered without reserve. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $88,000 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jul 2012
Jaguar's E-Type, or XKE for the American market, has earned its status as one of the most attractive cars to ever traverse the pavement. Its shape is as low and sleek as they come and stands as one of car design's all time greats. It has long been praised for its delicate grace and perfect proportions. Its designer was no romantic, though, and he scoffed at the idea of even being called a stylist.

When Malcolm Sayer penned the lines of the E-Type, he had neither beauty nor elegance in mind. He was a scientific man and cared little about such paltry concepts. What he envisioned, and what Jaguar ultimately created, was a vehicle set up to glide effortlessly through the air with the form necessary to encapsulate world class mechanicals.

Malcolm Sayer shrugged off the title of designer, and considered himself an 'aerodynamicist.' His work was practical, following a philosophy that theoretically placed form behind function on the list of priorities. But in a car whose function was flawless, a perfection of form was sure to follow. Thus the Jaugar E-Type, one of the greatest automotive ironies, was claimed by Sayer as the first production car to be drawn 'mathematically' and claimed by the public as pure poetry in sheet metal.

The E-Type was first shown at the 1961 Geneva Auto Show. Its American name of XKE was somewhat strange, given the car's distance from prior XK models. The XK150, which was basically the predecessor of the E-Type, had dramatically different lines and 400lbs of additional heft when compared to its replacement. Still, the E-Type was initially powered by one of the engines of the old XK family. The 3.8L inline six first used in the Geneva debutant was the highest performing variant offered in the XK150. Powering the light and aerodynamic E-Type, it was good for nearly 150mph. Though it wasn't as fresh as the rest of the car, the E-Type's engine was an excellent unit that, with 265bhp, made comparable power to the larger six and even the V12 that would eventually replace it.

With its superb design and well rated driving characteristics, the E-Type was able to serve Jaguar over a remarkably long production run. Produced through 1974, it deserves every bit of the praise it receives for being a timeless automobile.

Production was broken up into three series. The Series I was produced from 1961 to 1968. First offered with the aforementioned 3.8L six, Jaguar switched to a 4.2L unit based off the same design for the E-Type's 1965 model year. The revised engine with its new intake manifold and radiator produced an identical power rating of 265bhp, but its torque was up 23ft-lbs to 283. Also new for the 1965 model year was an all-synchromesh 4-speed gearbox. Other smaller improvements helped make 1965-1968 the best years for the Series I. For 1966, Jaguar added a 2+2 coupe to a model lineup that had previously consisted of just the 2-place convertible and coupe.

Continuing to offer the choice of three body styles, the E-Type Series II debuted in 1969. Whereas the 1965 model year revisions were definite improvements lauded by all, the features that comprised the Series II were not looked upon happily by enthusiasts. With safety regulations in mind, most of which originated in the United States, the Series II adopted a full-width front bumper that ran beneath headlights that had been pushed further towards the front of the car. New taillights were bigger and blockier, residing in a new location beneath the rear bumper. Larger front turn signals were also incorporated.

The Series II lasted for only a few years, replaced by the Series III. Both series were available for 1971, with the Series II getting phased out entirely in the American market during 1972. The Series III was the least pure of the E-Types. Its large egg crate grille and bigger hood bulge were less refined than the originals. Its higher weight and an engine strangled by emissions equipment brought the Series III further from its roots. At least the brand new V12 powering the Series III was a good design, a 5.3L piece constructed entirely of aluminum and using four Zenith carburetors. Its power gains were negligible, though, due to the increasingly strict emissions standards that killed off most performance cars of the 1970's. Despite the shortcomings of the Series III, the E-Type remained one of the better-looking and more sophisticated cars on the market until its discontinuation after 1974.

Jaguar replaced the E-Type with the XJ-S, which had an even longer life than its predecessor. When the XJ-S (called XJS towards the end of its run) was finally replaced, Jaguar looked back to the E-Type for stylistic inspiration. The new model, brought out for 1996, was called the XK8. Its highly regarded design brought back the low, sleek curves of the E-Type and helped kickoff a new generation of 'retro' designs.

Sources:

Gunnell, John. Standard Catalog of Jaguar 1946-2005. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2007. Print.

Wilson, Quentin. The Ultimate Classic Car Book. First. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1995. Print.

By Evan Acuña
Roadster
Chassis Num: 1E10968
 
Sold for $148,500 at 2008 RM Auctions.
Sold for $121,000 at 2011 RM Auctions.
This Jaguar E-Type is finished in Carmen Red with a black Stay Fast top and a black interior. It is a matching-numbers E-Type 4.2 Open Two Seater that has accumulated less than 10,000 miles from new. Power is from a 4235cc overhead valve twin cam inline six-cylinder engine breathing through three SU carburetors and mated to a four-speed synchronized manual gearbox.

In 2011, this vehicle was offered for sale at the Amelia Island auction presented by RM Auctions. The car was estimated to sell for $125,000 - $140,000. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $121,000 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2011
Coupe
Chassis Num: 1E30329
 
At launch Jaguar named their Fixed Head Coupe simply a 'GT.' The 1965 model preceded the longer 2+2 of 1966. In terms of good looks, those shorter-by-nine inches made the difference between handsome and a little frumpy. Of course, 1965 was still Series 1; still the Moss 4-speed gearbox with no synchromesh on 1st; now vinyl and leather. And a single (and simple) 'Jaguar' badge on the 'tailgate.' 'Hatchback' was not a term yet in the lexicon. All E-Type Jaguars featured independent rear suspension, four-wheel disc brake, and near 150 mph top speed.
Coupe
Chassis Num: IE20319
 
The Jaguar E-Type had a potent race-proven engine, the latest technology, and an elegant, aerodynamic design. The ultimate racing E-Type was the famed 'lightweight' roadster. A series of 12 lightweight alloy-bodied E-Types were produced. Some of the top drivers of the era drove these machines, including Graham Hill, Dan Gurney, Jackie Stewart, Jack Brabham, Brian Redman, Roy Salvadori, Bruce McLaren, and Briggs Cunningham.

This E-Type Coupe is a Semi-Lightweight example, having been built by West Riding Jaguar. It is based on a 1965 roadster tub with outer panels in aluminum, including the complete bonnet, doors, rear wings and boot lid. It has the Works-style hardtop, which is constructed in lightweight fiberglass. It is finished in Briggs Cunningham Le Mans livery and is period correct. The engine is a 3.-liter steel block example with wet-sump lubrication running Weber 45 DCOE carburetors. Cooling systems uses an aluminum radiator and header tank, all FIA-specification race fuel cell and tubular exhaust manifolds into a free-flow exhaust system. There is an all-synchromesh gearbox that drives the 300 bhp engine via an AP competition clutch. There is an LSD racing differential, magnesium alloy wheels, and Dunlop L section tires.

In 2012, the car was offered for sale at Coys 'Legende et Passion' Monaco sale where it was estimated to sell for €120,000 - €150,000.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jul 2012
Roadster
 
The SCCA C-Production class in amateur racing was dominated by Datsun for many years when Gran Turismo Jaguar, a small Ohio dealer with a following of enthusiasts, began massaging the 1970s E-Type Jaguars believing they could make competitive race cars out of them. The 1980 SCCA Runoffs at Road Atlanta was their chance to prove it - and they did.

GTJ Old Number 19 is 'The most competitive E-Type Jaguar in road racing history,' according to its owner. It is the car that beat Paul Newman and the three factory-supported, money-is-no-object Datsun 280Z race cars for the 1980 SCCA C-Production National Championship. The car was 15-years-old at time. At the wheel was Fred Baker who managed to win despite efforts to push him off the track, repeated protests against the car's roll cage, brakes, exhaust system, bonnet and aerodynamics. The Jaguar had been carefully prepared to meet all the rules and baker brought it in for a 7-second win over Newman in the closest Datsun.
Coupe
Chassis Num: 1E30329
 
Built on December 7th of 164, this 4.2 Liter Fixed Head Coupe (FHC) was shipped from Coventry to the U.S. East Coast distributor, Jaguar Cars New York.

The E-Type was purchased by the current owner's family in 2003. At the time of its purchase, the Carmine Red Coupe with a black interior, was considered a 'nice driver.' The owner took the decision to slowly restore the car piece by piece, as a full restoration was, at the time, out of the question as it would require too much time and a lot of time and money the family did not have.

Fate intervened one afternoon in 2005. The owner was driving the E-Type through the canyons in and around Los Angeles when another driver who was talking on their cell phone turned left in front of him. The owner had no time to brake and the two cars collided. The E-Type looked like 'a smashed red accordion.'

The owner's collision coverage allowed them to fix and restore their E-Type. After an intense six month restoration by Steve's Jaguar in Canoga Park, CA, the E-Type was 'better than new.' The completed car was painted Carmen Red and the interior had already been changed to biscuit color it is today. Since the completion of the restoration this E-Type has taken many first class wins at local concours events and in 2011 it took home a first in class win at the Ocean Avenue auto show in Carmel-by-the-sea.

This E-Type also starred in two episodes of AMC's Emmy award-wining series, Mad Men.
The Jaguar E type, also known as the XK-E, brought style and performance together to create a mass-produced supercar. The road-going sports car was conceived in 1956 as a replacement for the D-type. In March of 1961 the E-Type was officially introduced to the world at the Geneva, Switzerland Motor show.
It's design was created by an aerodynamic engineer named Malcolm Sayer. The front engine, rear-wheel drive vehicle featured a moncoque body and a tubular front chassis. The six-cylinder double-cam engine had three SU carburetors and produced 265 horsepower. The suspension was independent with disc brakes on all four wheels. It brought together the best or aerodynamics, coupled with the latest technology and propelled by a potent engine. The vehicle was not only fast, it offered excellent performance and handling. Some of the most common complaints it received were the cabin being too cramped and it suffered from poor ventilation.

The E-Type was a popular vehicle. It was fast, performed well, and was competitively priced. Due to the United States safety and emission regulations, some of the horsepower was lost. The headlamp covers were also removed prior to the close of the 1960's.

A 4.2-liter engine and synchromesh gearbox was introduced in 1964. In 1966, the 2+2 coupe was introduced and featured a longer wheelbase. The Series II cars were not as quick as its predecessors. The Series III, however, was a different story. Powered by a V-12 engine they were once again able to propel the E-Type over 145 miles per hour.

Production for the E-Type ceased in 1975, after 72,520 examples being produced. It was replaced by the XJ-S; a vehicle that was larger, heavier, and not as visually appealing.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2006
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Jaguar: 1961-1970
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