Home : Vehicles : 1933 Duesenberg Model SJ Previous Image Prev   Next Next ImageGallery   
1933 Duesenberg Model SJ Image
1933 Duesenberg Model SJ informationChassis: 2551
Engine: SJ528
Event : Concours d'Elegance of America at St. John'sImage credit: © Conceptcarz.com

1933 Duesenberg Model SJ Wallpaper Image 1024x681

  2146
See previous images See previous images
See next images See next images

1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ
1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ
1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ
1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ
1933 Duesenberg Model SJ1933 Duesenberg Model SJ
Riviera Phaeton
Coachwork: Brunn
Chassis Num: 2551
Engine Num: SJ528
 
Sold for $1,320,000 at 2005 RM Auctions.
Sold for $1,430,000 at 2010 RM Auctions.
This 1933 Duesenberg SJ Riviera Phaeton (SJ528), one of only 36 SJs produced, was purchased in June of 1934 by Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, best known for the invention of the cartridge-style Schick Razor and the first electric 'dry razor.' Schick kept the car for two years before trading it in on a new car. The second owner was C.H. Oshei of Detroit, Michigan who purchased the car in October of 1936. Oshei traded J107, a LaGrande dual-cowl phaeton, in the transaction.

Oshei sold SJ528 in 1941 to a Chicago-area Duesenberg dealer named John Troka, who resold the car to A.E. Sullivan of Rockford, Illinois. Sullivan sold the car to Margarite Feuer, of Rockford, Illinois, who kept it only a short while before selling it to a musician named Vaughn. In the late 1940s, Vaughn sold the car back to Troka. While in Troka's care, the supercharger was removed and used for another project. The car was then sold to Art Grossman of Chicago, Illinois. Grossman intended to undertake a restoration but instead sold the car in April 1950 to Harry Schultzinger of Cincinnati, Ohio, who immediately began restoring the car.

During the restoration process, Schultzinger replaced the frame with one from J551 (frame number 2577). The rest of SJ528 remained intact, including the engine, body, drivetrain components, etc. Schultzinger gave SJ528 a number of 'improvements,' including the installation of a five-speed transmission from a truck, 17-inch wheels, and an engine rebuild using components from J467.

Schultzinger kept the car for many years before selling it to Dr. Don Vesley of Louisiana in 1975. The car was sold in 1983 to a Florida collector named Rick Carroll, who undertook a second restoration, this time in red, and reinstalled an original supercharger, transmission and 19-inch wheels.

Bob Bahre of Oxford, Maine purchased the car sometime in 1986. Later, in 1988, Phoenix, Arizona-based dealer Leo Gephardt advertised the car for sale, before it passed on to the late Noel Thompson, a prominent New Jersey collector. Thompson sold the car to the Imperial Palace, where it was prominently featured in the Duesenberg Room for many years before Dean Kruse of Auburn, Indiana acquired it as part of a multiple-car purchase in 1999.

The next owner commissioned the car's third – and most comprehensive – restoration. The 'nut-and-bolt' restoration was done by Fran Roxas and included a bare-metal strip and every mechanical component was completely rebuilt or refurbished as necessary and completely refinished.

The car was finished in multiple coasts of black paint. The interior is trimmed in tobacco brown leather and there is a matching Haartz cloth top.

In early 2005, the car was acquired by the O'Quinn Collection. The next care taker purchased the car in 2010 at the RM Auction in Monterey, California.

Just three of these Brunn Riviera Phaetons are known to have been built, and SJ528 is one of a handful original-bodied supercharged Model J's remaining today. The convertible sedan body by Brunn allows the entire rear body to open, hinged at the bumper, revealing a compartment into which the top can be lowered and placed completely hidden from site.

At the first annual Concours d'Elegance of America at St. John's in suburban Detroit, Michigan (formerly known as the Meadow Brook Concours), SJ528 took home top honors, winning Best of Show for the American cars.

By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2011
Riviera Phaeton
Coachwork: Brunn
Chassis Num: 2551
Engine Num: SJ528
 
Sold for $1,320,000 at 2005 RM Auctions.
Sold for $1,430,000 at 2010 RM Auctions.
After Fred Duesenberg died in a Model J accident in 1932, his brother Augie was retained to put the final touches on the supercharged Duesenberg SJ. The SJ delivered 320 brake horsepower while retaining the outstanding naturally aspirated performance of the J at lower RPM. Since the SJ required external exhaust manifolds to accommodate the supercharger under its hood, the giant chromed flexible exhaust pipes became its signature feature. Just three of these Brunn Riviera Phaetons are known to have been built and only two were supercharged SJs. The first owner of this car was Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, best known today for inventing the cartridge-style Schick razor and the first electric razor. After several additional owners it was purchased by John O'Quinn in 2005.