1966 GMC Electrovan Experimental news, pictures, specifications, and information
Van
The Electrovan Experimental was developed in 1966 by General Motors Engineering Staff, Power Development and Research Laborites. This was a significant step forward in power vehicles was alternative power. With the experience of its on-going battery-powered electric car program, GM had identified the need for a sustainable source of electricity that would yield useful driving range and power. The Electrovan demonstrated the feasibility of an electric propulsion system powered with fuel cells. GM's Electrovan represented the world's first known application of fuel cell technology in a vehicle.
Van
Even as far back as the mid-1960s, General Motors was earnestly exploring futuristic vehicles with alternative power sources, including electric; and this 1966 Electrovair II concept was a test bed for electric motor and control development. It was actually GM's second attempt at an electric-powered Corvair. But when the first one didn't meet the engineers 'hoped-for performance<' they started from scratch with a new one using a 532-volt silver-zinc battery pack stuffed into its front truck and what had been its rear engine compartment.

Because it used comparatively light and compact silver-zinc batteries, the Electrovair II weighs about 800 pounds more than a standard Corvair, where an equivalent pack of conventional lead acid batteries would have weighed closer to 2,600 pounds. The silver-zinc batteries also offered good energy storage and high peak power, but their downsides were high cost and the unfortunate reality that they were essential worn out after only about 100 recharges. The car's 115 horsepower AC-Induction motor that provided acceleration competitive with the gasoline version and an 80-mph top speed. Its major disadvantage was a driving range of only 40-80 miles before recharging.

Strictly an engineering exercise, the Electrovair II was never intended for production. With relatively stable and cheap gasoline prices in the mid-1960s, the American public wasn't exactly clamoring for electric cars at the time.
 
Recent Vehicle Additions

GM HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS MARK 50 YEARS OF DEVELOPMENT

Electrovan was first fuel cell technology transfer from JFKs moonshot challenge DETROIT — The year 1966 brought the TV debuts of Batman and Star Trek, which both enjoy a cultlike following...

ŠKODA AT AUTO SHANGHAI 2017

Mladá Boleslav Shanghai, 18 April 2017 –At the Auto Shanghai exhibition (19-28 April 2017), ŠKODA is celebrating the world premiere of its first fully electrically powered concept car. With the...

NISSAN AND BMW PARTNER ONCE AGAIN TO EXPAND DC FAST CHARGER ACCESS ACROSS THE U.S. TO BENEFIT EV DRIVERS

An additional 174 EVgo-networked 50kW DC Fast charging stations have been installed across 33 states to facilitate easier longer distance electric vehicle travel for Nissan LEAF and BMW i3 drivers, a...

HYBRID TECHNOLOGY IN THE LMP1 PORSCHE 919 HYBRID

FIA World Endurance Championship WEC, LMP1, Technology Atlanta, Georgia. This weekend, the Le Mans Prototype Porsche 919 Hybrid has its only 2016 appearance in Germany. At the six-hour ra...

BMW: PAVING THE WAY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

The new BMW 330e and BMW 225xe Plug-in-Hybrid Electric Vehicles. BMW Light and Charge technology provides a cutting-edge charging solution. £40 million to boost green cars across the UK. Hydrogen...

BEST OF WHAT'S NEW FOR 2014? THE TOYOTA FUEL CELL VEHICLE

November 12, 2014 -- Even the techies at Popular Science like the Toyota Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV). The magazine named the sedan to a 2014 Best of Whats New winner in the auto category. For...

Acadia
Colorado
Envoy
EV1
Hy wire
Safari
Savana
Silverado
Sonoma
Tahoe
Terrain
Typhoon

© 1998-2017. All rights reserved. The material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Vehicle information, history, and
specifications from concept to production.

Follow ConceptCarz on Facebook  Follow ConceptCarz on Twitter RSS News Feed

Conceptcarz.com
© 1998-2017 Conceptcarz.com Reproduction or reuse prohibited without written consent.