Hamann Minor Series I

MINI Concept Geneva
2006 MINI Concept Geneva
Original Price: $16,950

MINI Minor Series I

MINI Concept Tokyo
2005 MINI Concept Tokyo
Original Price: $16,500

MINI Minor Series I

MINI Roadster
2012 MINI Roadster
MSRP: $24,350-$34,500
Invoice: $21,915-$31,050
MINI Coupé
2012 MINI Coupé
MSRP: $21,300-$31,200
Invoice: $19,175-$28,085
MINI Cooper
2006 MINI Cooper
Original Price: $16,950
Average Auction Sale: $11,965
Recall information
MINI Cooper
2005 MINI Cooper
Original Price: $16,500
Average Auction Sale: $10,661
Recall information
MINI Cooper
2004 MINI Cooper
Original Price: $16,500
Average Auction Sale: $9,450
Recall information
MINI Cooper
2003 MINI Cooper
Original Price: $16,426
Average Auction Sale: $8,705
Recall information
MINI Cooper
2002 MINI Cooper
Original Price: $17,990
Average Auction Sale: $12,614
Recall information
Now the long period of waiting is finally coming to an end: A very special version of the MINI is making its world debut at the Geneva Motor Show, injecting a fresh breeze into the world of motoring – the new MINI Convertible. Introducing this versatile four-seater, MINI is combining the distinctive pleasure of driving an open car with the unique enjoyment you can only feel at the wheel of a genuine MINI.
Combining supreme fun with practical value.

The MINI Convertible is a fully-fledged four-seater clearly standing out from the start as a genuine MINI regardless of whether the roof is up or down. For the design features and proportions so characteristic of the MINI have been consistently carried over to the MINI Convertible: The steeply raked windscreen and the optimum seating position enjoyed by the driver ensure an unforgettable open-air experience also when driving with the roof down. So the new model version leaves no doubt that motoring pleasure is an outstanding factor on all four seats of this uniquely popular cult car.

Clearly, the MINI Convertible boasts a clever all-round concept with supreme function and optimum use of space available.

Striking profile.

With its roof down, this classy convertible really looks at its best. The waistline gradually rising to the rear gives the car a strong and distinctive profile further accentuated by the chrome strip continuing along the complete window line. The steeply raked windscreen, complete absence of a B-pillar, the rollbars made of extra-strong aluminum pipes behind the rear-seat backrest, as well as the compact, folding roof all bear testimony to the unique style of a classic convertible.

The new MINI Convertible is entering the market initially in the guise of the 66 kW/90 bhp MINI One and the 85 kW/115 bhp MINI Cooper. The top-of-the-range MINI Cooper S Convertible will be following later.

In standard trim the MINI Convertible comes on 15-inch steel or, respectively, light-alloy rims (MINI One/MINI Cooper) running on 175/65 R15 tyres. As an option, both models are available with attractive 16- and 17-inch light-alloy wheels, with the 17-inch five-star Bullet light-alloy wheels developed exclusively for the new open-air version.

A convertible with a sliding roof all in one.

The roof available in three colours opens up fully automatically within just 15 seconds: Pressing a button, you first open the integrated sliding roof, then the complete soft roof as such. With the soft roof folding to the rear, the roof columns are automatically retracted and the rear side windows move down at the same time. The intelligent Z-folding mechanism allows the complete roof to fold up in compact arrangement behind the rear seats, with no need for a tonneau cover.

The sliding roof integrated in the soft top can be opened infinitely up to 40 cm or 15¾´´ while driving, up to a speed of 120 km/h or 75 mph. Clearly, a feature quite unprecedented in the convertible market.

Optimum utilisation of space available.

Folding out to the back, the rear lid is held in position when open by two steel cables with a spring-mounted retractor system. This allows use of the rear lid with its hinges facing to the outside as a practical loading panel able to carry a weight of up to 80 kg or 176 lb.

The MINI Convertible is able to carry a maximum of 400 kg or 882 lb, and the luggage compartment accommodates 165 litres with the roof closed. And even with the roof down, driving in the open air, luggage compartment capacity remains a substantial 120 litres.

The Easy Load system offers generous through-loading capacity: With the roof closed, all you do is turn two levers in the luggage compartment to fold up the bottom section of the cover fastened on a tightening bracket and attach it in position. Then, with the rear lid open, you have very convenient access to the luggage compartment through a large opening able to accommodate even bulky objects. And in conjunction with the rear seat backrests folding forward and fastened securely in position, luggage compartment capacity can be increased to no less than 605 litres.

Boasting features such as its highly functional roof, the variable luggage compartment even with the roof open, an ultra-strong and stiff bodyshell, as well as the chassis with its multi-arm rear axle, the MINI Convertible sets the standard in its market segment in many other other respects too.

That go-kart feeling so typical of the MINI.

Combining a very stiff bodyshell with superior chassis and suspension features, the open-air models, like their fixed-roof counterparts, once again offer a unique symbiosis of superior agility and handling. The drive concept as such, the long wheelbase, a low centre of gravity, wide track, the multi-arm rear axle and the direct, electrohydraulic power steering all go together to provide the foundation for the excellent driving behaviour and go-kart feeling so typical of the MINI Convertible.

Sporting performance wherever you go.

Both versions of the MINI Convertible feature a 1.6-litre four-cylinder power unit developing maximum output of 66 kW/90 bhp in the MINI One and 85 kW/115 bhp in the MINI Cooper. Maximum torque of 140 Nm/103 lb-ft and, respectively, 150 Nm/111 lb-ft comes at just 3000 and, respectively, 4,500 rpm. A smooth-shifting five-speed manual gearbox is standard on both models. Top speed of the MINI One Convertible is 175 km/h or 109 mph, with acceleration to 100 km/h in 11.8 seconds. Fuel consumption in the composite EU cycle is 7.2 litres premium/100 km, equivalent to 39.2 mpg Imp.

Maximum output of 85 kW/115 bhp gives the MINI Cooper Convertible a top speed of 193 km/h or 120 mph. Acceleration to 100 km/h from a standstill comes in just 9.8 seconds, fuel consumption in the EU cycle is 7.3 litres/100 km, equal to 38.7 mpg Imp.

High standard of safety.

Benefitting from its stiff body structure and restraint system comprising, inter alia, two 'intelligent' frontal airbags and two seat-integrated head/thorax side airbags as standard, the MINI Convertible naturally complies with the world's strictest crash standards required by law. A wide range of constructional improvements and features ensures a particularly high standard of torsional stiffness preventing the door-sills from bending in in the event of a head-on collision and offering the occupants optimum protection in an impact from the side.

Should the MINI Convertible ever be involved in a rollover, the A-pillars encompassing a tube made of ultra-strong steel guarantee a strong load-bearing function. And at the rear double rollbars made of high-strength aluminium tubes, complete with integrated headrests, afford superior passenger safety.

A high standard of active safety is ensured, inter alia, by four disc brakes, four-sensor ABS, Electronic Brake Force Distribution (EBD), as well as Cornering Brake Control (CBC). Available as an option, Automatic Stability and Traction Control (ASC+T) as well as Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) help to provide superior driving and tracking stability in an extreme situation.

MINI in colour.

The MINI Convertible is available in 10 exterior colours, two of which are reserved exclusively to this open-air model: Hot Orange and, to provide a particular effect, Cool Blue. And while the MINI One Convertible comes only with a black roof, the roof of the open-air MINI Cooper is available in Black, Blue, and Green. The exterior mirror housings, in turn, are again finished in Black on the 'basic' model and come in body colour on the MINI Cooper Convertible.

High-quality textile materials and surfaces give the interior special harmony and balance. The dashboard and door linings are available in Silver and Anthracite and also come as a further choice in wood and aluminium trim.

The seat upholstery is available in 3 different types of cloth, 3 combinations of cloth and leather, and with three different choices of all-leather upholstery.

Everything goes.

The wide range of standard equipment featured from the start on the new Convertible comprises, inter alia, an electrically operated roof complete with sliding roof function, a heated glass rear window, two frontal and two head/thorax side airbags, four-sensor ABS, Electronic Brake Force Distribution (EBD), Cornering Brake Control (CBC), BMW's Tyre Defect Indicator (TDI), electrically operated rear-view mirrors and window lifts, power steering, Park Distance Control (PDC), a rev counter, height adjustment on the both driver's seat and steering column, as well as central locking with remote control plus comfort opening.

To fulfill all kinds of individual and personal wishes, the MINI Convertible comes with an equally wide range of special equipment comprising features such as xenon headlights, a TV navigation system with a 16:9 colour display, high-quality HiFi audio systems, a heated rear window, automatic air conditioning, a wind deflector, a wide range of light-alloy wheels, a multifunction steering wheel, a rain sensor, and the interior mirror complete with anti-dazzle function.

Successful and popular.

Apart from the MINI Convertible making its debut in Geneva, the four existing fixed-roof models already very successful in the market are naturally also to be admired at the Show: the MINI One, MINI One D, MINI Cooper, and MINI Cooper S. And 'popular' is indeed the right word to describe these successful models already delivered to more than 176,000 thrilled customers the world over.

Source - MINI

Austin Minor Series I

Austin Mini Cooper MKII
1968 Austin Mini Cooper MKII
Original Price: $1,840
Average Auction Sale: $16,090
Chassis Profiles

Total Production: 42,900

Austin Minor Series I


Total Production: 30,912
The Riley version of the Austin Mini was a more refined vehicle offering additional luxury items, slightly larger boot space, and an improved interior. The Riley Elf, as well as the Wolseley Hornet stablemate, was introduced in 1961. The Hornet and Elf were distinguished by their contrasting chromed grilles in the tradition of each automakers style. The interior had a full-width wood veneer dashboard in the Elf. Two-tone color schemes and more chrome were a few other features that separated the production Mini from these alternatives.

Originally, an 848cc engine could be found in both the Elf and Hornet. This was later changed in 1963 when the more powerful 998cc MKII unit was introduced. Other improvements followed, such as Hydrolastic suspension and a diaphragm clutch, resulting in the MKIII. The Elf and Hornet were the first 'Mini's' to feature roll-up windows, face-level ventilation, remote gearchange linkage and deleted external door hinges.

Production of the Hornet and Elf lasted from 1961 through 1969 with a total of 30,912 Elfs and 28,445 Hornets constructed.
By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008

Riley Minor Series I

Austin MINI Cooper S
1966 Austin MINI Cooper S
Original Price: $2,350
Average Auction Sale: $25,915
Chassis Profiles
Austin MINI Cooper S
1965 Austin MINI Cooper S
Original Price: $2,350
Average Auction Sale: $24,573
Chassis Profiles
Austin Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Mini Cooper
Original Price: $1,730
Average Auction Sale: $31,918
Chassis Profiles
Austin 850
1960 Austin 850
Original Price: $1,295
Average Auction Sale: $15,912
Chassis Profiles

Total Production: 119,000

Austin Minor Series I

Morris Mini Cooper
1969 Morris Mini Cooper
Original Price: $1,300 - $1,700
Average Auction Sale: $18,346
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor
1968 Morris Minor
Original Price: $1,670
Average Auction Sale: $6,114
Chassis Profiles
Morris Mini-Minor
1967 Morris Mini-Minor
Original Price: $1,300 - $1,670
Average Auction Sale: $10,442
Chassis Profiles
Morris Mini Cooper S
1966 Morris Mini Cooper S
Original Price: $1,300 - $1,770
Average Auction Sale: $31,250
Chassis Profiles
Morris Mini Minor 850
1965 Morris Mini Minor 850
Original Price: $1,300 - $1,770
Average Auction Sale: $14,660
Chassis Profiles
1964 Morris Minor
Original Price: $1,680 - $1,900
Average Auction Sale: $4,476
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor
1963 Morris Minor
Original Price: $1,680 - $1,920
Average Auction Sale: $10,127
Chassis Profiles
Morris Mini-Minor 850
1960 Morris Mini-Minor 850
Original Price: $1,300 - $1,700
Average Auction Sale: $11,704
Chassis Profiles

Morris Minor Series I

Morris Minor 1000
1971 Morris Minor 1000
Original Price: $1,670 - $1,920
Average Auction Sale: $12,397
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor 1000
1967 Morris Minor 1000
Original Price: $1,670 - $1,920
Average Auction Sale: $9,456
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor 1000
1965 Morris Minor 1000
Original Price: $1,670 - $1,970
Average Auction Sale: $7,383
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor
1962 Morris Minor
Original Price: $1,490 - $1,795
Average Auction Sale: $9,893
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor 1000
1961 Morris Minor 1000
Original Price: $1,495
Average Auction Sale: $10,117
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor 1000
1960 Morris Minor 1000
Original Price: $1,500 - $1,800
Average Auction Sale: $12,396
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor 1000
1959 Morris Minor 1000
Original Price: $1,560 - $1,770
Average Auction Sale: $12,590
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor
1958 Morris Minor
Original Price: $1,550 - $1,650
Average Auction Sale: $14,765
Chassis Profiles
Morris Minor 1000
1957 Morris Minor 1000
Produced: 125,000
Original Price: $1,550 - $1,770
Average Auction Sale: $10,485
Chassis Profiles

Total Production: 847,491
Considered to be the ‘World's Supreme Small Car', by the motoring press at the launch, the demand of the vehicle outstripped supply of the Morris Minor.

The Morris Minor was the first British car to ever reach a production rate of one million.
Originally called the Mosquito, the Morris Minor was introduced at the Earls Court Motor Show on September 20th, 1948. After the millionth Minor rolled off the production line on December 22nd 1960, the Morris Minor 1000 was introduced.

A total of 349 replicas were produced to the mark this auspicious occasion.
The Morris Minor was built by William Morris, (Lord Nuffield) of the Nuffield Organization. The same team that eventually designed the Mini, it was led by Alec Issigonis, who was proudest of his participation in designing the Morris Minor.

Originally tried and tested with 918cc side valve from the Series E Morris Eight, Issigonis had originally intended the Morris Minor to have a 800 cc and 1100cc flat four water, cooled enine.

The prototype name was originally classified the 'Mosquito' and together with Jack Daniels and Reg Job, they set out to create a completely new and innovative vehicle.

The most significant of Issigonis' decisions regarding the Morris Minor, was the decision to widen the vehicle by four inches.

Every prototype was a total of 57 inches wide, but the designer felt that this was too narrow, so he ordered one of the eight prototypes to be split down the middle.

Obviously there were serious design implications for the design team who were responsible for recalculating hundreds of dimensions. But the extra width did give the car an enhanced stability and road holding.

The flat strip running down the center of the bonnet is a tribute to the historic decision regarding the Morris Minors.
With unique features such as monocoque design rather than the traditional chassis/body, striking stylin lines, independent front suspension, small fourteen inch wheels and rach and pinion steering.

A vehicle that combined the luxuries and conveniences of a reliable motor vehicle with a price even the working class could afford. When compared to competitor products in the late 1940's, the Morris Minor excelled as a roomy vehicle with superior corning/handling characteristics.

Updated in 1956, the Minor 1000 had an engine with a increased capacity to 0.9 L (948 cc/57 in³). Replacing the two piece split windscreen, it now had a curved one-piece one and a enlarged rear window.

With an even larger engine, 1.1 L (1098 cc/67 in³) in 1962, the Minor 1000 could now achieve 77 mph. Aditional modifications included a new dashboard layout, a different heater, and a new larger tail/flasher with front side/flasher lamps.

The first British car to sell over 1,000,000 units, the Morris Minor was produced in 1961 to commemorate this event.

A limited edition of 349 two-door saloons was produced with distinctive lilac paintwork and a white interior. The models were designed with white and gold leather seats. Modified, the badge on the side of the bonnet read 'Minor 1,000,000' instead of the standard 'Minor 1000'.

Receiving another upgrade in 1962, the Minor 1000 now featured the 1098cc engine which improved power output. It aslo received a larger clutch, more improved heater and rear lights and larger drums on the front.
The Morris Minor was a limited sell in America, which may have been a result of internal politicking by inside manufacturer BMC (British Motor Corporation).

Produced in manufacturing plants at Cowley, Oxfordshire, over 1.6 million Morris Minors were produced and exported in numurous variations worldwide. Production of the Morris Minor continued until 1971 and has continued to remain a very collectible vehicle.

Because of the transatlantic styling that resembled a late 1940's Chevrolet, it eventually became a popular basis to build a hot rod on.

Unfortunately production declined. In 1969, production of the Tourer was ended with the Saloon line dropping out the following year. The final year for the Traveller and commercial versions was 1971.

By the end of its production , nearly 850,000 Minor 1000s were produced. Offically replaced by the Morris Marina, which replaced it o the Cowley production lines which in 1971 had mutated into the British Leyland Motor Corporation.

Lasting from 1948 to 1953, the original Minor MM series included a pair of 4-seat saloons, a convertible 4-seat tourier and a 2 and 4-door.

Among the best served classic, family sized car, the Morris Minor and 1000 continue to gain poplarity. The number of rebuilt and improved Morris Minors that are currently produced in Britain reflect its continuing status. Today it is updated with a more powerful engine and the replacement of the ‘original equipment' drum brakes with disc brakes.

Available in three different model variations, all models had significant differences though pretty much the same shape.

The series MM was available from September 1948 until February of 1953 and came with the 918cc sidevalve engine which was the least powerful of all Minor engines. It came with a split windscreen with tiny rear windows with headlights that mounted in the front grille. Originally the series MM was available in two door, before eventually in 4 door, and finally in ‘tourer' soft top / convertible form. This series is most likely the most expensive and sought after models.

The Series II was created when the old Morris side valve engine was ditched in favor of the more modern 803cc overhead valve from the Austin A30. This series lasted from 1952 to 1956.

Increasing the performance considerably, the Series two adopted the Austin gearbox in 1955. In May of 1953 the ‘Light Commercial Vehicles' were launched and each had separate chassis. Available in pick-up and van version, the Traveller was introduced in October 1953. It was in 1956 that the Minor was once again modernized. It was updated with a larger 948 cc engine, which now increased power output by 20%

By Jessica Donaldson

Morris Minor Series I

Morris Minor
1949 Morris Minor
Original Price: $1,575
Average Auction Sale: $5,892
Chassis Profiles

Related Articles and History
Considered to be the ‘World's Supreme Small Car', by the motoring press at the launch, the demand of the vehicle outstripped supply of the Morris Minor.
The Morris Minor was the first British car to ever reach a production rate of one million.
Originally called the Mosquito, the Morris Minor was introduced at the Earls Court Motor Show on September 20th, 1948. After the millionth Minor rolled off the production line on December 22nd 1960, the Morris Minor 1000 was introduced.
A total of 349 replicas were produced to the mark this auspicious occasion.
The Morris Minor was built by William Morris, (Lord Nuffield) of the Nuffield Organization. The same team that eventually designed the Mini, it was led by Alec Issigonis, who was proudest of his participation in designing the Morris Minor.
Originally tried and tested with 918cc side valve from the Series E Morris Eight, Issigonis had originally intended the Morris Minor to have a 800 cc and 1100cc flat four water, cooled enine.
The prototype name was originally classified the 'Mosquito' and together with Jack Daniels and Reg Job, they set out to create a completely new and innovative vehicle.
The most significant of Issigonis' decisions regarding the Morris Minor, was the decision to widen the vehicle by four inches.
Every prototype was a total of 57 inches wide, but the designer felt that this was too narrow, so he ordered one of the eight prototypes to be split down the middle.
Obviously there were serious design implications for the design team who were responsible for recalculating hundreds of dimensions. But the extra width did give the car an enhanced stability and road holding.
The flat strip running down the center of the bonnet is a tribute to the historic decision regarding the Morris Minors.
With unique features such as monocoque design rather than the traditional chassis/body, striking stylin lines, independent front suspension, small fourteen inch wheels and rach and pinion steering.
A vehicle that combined the luxuries and conveniences of a reliable motor vehicle with a price even the working class could afford. When compared to competitor products in the late 1940's, the Morris Minor excelled as a roomy vehicle with superior corning/handling characteristics.
Updated in 1956, the Minor 1000 had an engine with a increased capacity to 0.9 L (948 cc/57 in³). Replacing the two piece split windscreen, it now had a curved one-piece one and a enlarged rear window.
With an even larger engine, 1.1 L (1098 cc/67 in³) in 1962, the Minor 1000 could now achieve 77 mph. Aditional modifications included a new dashboard layout, a different heater, and a new larger tail/flasher with front side/flasher lamps.
The first British car to sell over 1,000,000 units, the Morris Minor was produced in 1961 to commemorate this event.
A limited edition of 349 two-door saloons was produced with distinctive lilac paintwork and a white interior. The models were designed with white and gold leather seats. Modified, the badge on the side of the bonnet read 'Minor 1,000,000' instead of the standard 'Minor 1000'.
Receiving another upgrade in 1962, the Minor 1000 now featured the 1098cc engine which improved power output. It aslo received a larger clutch, more improved heater and rear lights and larger drums on the front.
The Morris Minor was a limited sell in America, which may have been a result of internal politicking by inside manufacturer BMC (British Motor Corporation).
Produced in manufacturing plants at Cowley, Oxfordshire, over 1.6 million Morris Minors were produced and exported in numurous variations worldwide. Production of the Morris Minor continued until 1971 and has continued to remain a very collectible vehicle.
Because of the transatlantic styling that resembled a late 1940's Chevrolet, it eventually became a popular basis to build a hot rod on.
Unfortunately production declined. In 1969, production of the Tourer was ended with the Saloon line dropping out the following year. The final year for the Traveller and commercial versions was 1971.
By the end of its production , nearly 850,000 Minor 1000s were produced. Offically replaced by the Morris Marina, which replaced it o the Cowley production lines which in 1971 had mutated into the British Leyland Motor Corporation.
Lasting from 1948 to 1953, the original Minor MM series included a pair of 4-seat saloons, a convertible 4-seat tourier and a 2 and 4-door.
Among the best served classic, family sized car, the Morris Minor and 1000 continue to gain poplarity. The number of rebuilt and improved Morris Minors that are currently produced in Britain reflect its continuing status. Today it is updated with a more powerful engine and the replacement of the ‘original equipment' drum brakes with disc brakes.
Available in three different model variations, all models had significant differences though pretty much the same shape.
The series MM was available from September 1948 until February of 1953 and came with the 918cc sidevalve engine which was the least powerful of all Minor engines. It came with a split windscreen with tiny rear windows with headlights that mounted in the front grille. Originally the series MM was available in two door, before eventually in 4 door, and finally in ‘tourer' soft top / convertible form. This series is most likely the most expensive and sought after models.
The Series II was created when the old Morris side valve engine was ditched in favor of the more modern 803cc overhead valve from the Austin A30. This series lasted from 1952 to 1956.
Increasing the performance considerably, the Series two adopted the Austin gearbox in 1955. In May of 1953 the ‘Light Commercial Vehicles' were launched and each had separate chassis. Available in pick-up and van version, the Traveller was introduced in
October 1953.
It was in 1956 that the Minor was once again modernized. It was updated with a larger 948 cc engine, which now increased power output by 20%

By Jessica Donaldson
The British Motor Corporation came into existence in 1952 by the merging of two manufacturers, Nuffield Motors and Austin. Nuffield was known for its Morris line of vehicles, while Austin had its 'Seven' model line. The transition for the two manufacturers was difficult and had been forced out of necessity. After World War II, many vehicle manufacturers could not stay in business due to destroyed factories, recovering economies, strained resources, and lack of funds. Combining the two companies was a means to stay in business.

A fuel shortage was occurring. German engineers quickly adapted and began producing fuel-efficient vehicles. Examples include the Volkswagen Beetle. Leonard Lord, Chairman of BMC and former head of Austin, commissioned Sir Alec Issigonis to design a vehicle to compete with the German-made vehicles.

Alec Issigonis was a graduate of Battersea Technical College. After graduation he worked as a draftsman for a plethora of engineering projects. Later, he joined Morris Motors where he was tasked with creating and fitting suspensions to the Morris vehicles.

Issigonis was outfitted with requirements to create a fuel-efficient, affordable, safe vehicle capable of carrying four individuals including luggage. To save on development costs, it was requested that an existing BMC engine be used. What he created was a vehicle that sat atop of 10 inch wheels. By using smaller wheels there was little need for wheel wells.

The car was expected to carry four individuals; the combined weight of the passengers being greater than the entire vehicle. A suspension was needed that could accept this pay-load. With his prior experience creating and working with suspensions, Issigonis designed a rubber cone suspension.

A 950 cc, four cylinder, BMC engine was selected. It was mounted in the front and expected to power the front wheels, a system that was revolutionary at the time. Instead of mounting the engine longitudinally, it was place transversely. The transmission was place under the engine due to space constraints.

When Issigonis presented his designs and recommendations to Lord in 1958, changes were requested. Instead of the 950 cc engine, a 34 horsepower, 848 cc engine would be used, making the vehicle slower but more importantly, more safe. The other request was to make the vehicle two inches wider.

There were two versions of the car when it was first introduced on August 26, 1959. The only difference between the 1959 Austin and Morris versions was their badges.

John Cooper had designed vehicles that successfully won the Formula One championships in 1959 and 1960.

He proposed a marriage between his 1000 cc Formula Junior engine with the Mini. Lord approved the idea and in 1961 the Mini Cooper was born. It was fitted with a 997 cc engine producing 55 horsepower. Later, the Cooper S came into being with the advent of the 970 cc and the 1275 cc engine - the latter capable of 76 horsepower.

From 1964 through 1967 the little car dominated the Monte Carlo Rally. The car easily achieved these victories using a 91 horsepower engine.

Minis became more than just a practical car, they became a fashion statement. This, combined with their practicality, fuel efficiency, and success on the race track, created an overwhelming demand for the little car.

In the 1980's, the Mini was starting to loose momentum. Rover tried to revitalize the Mini brand by creating special editions. In all, there were more than 40 different editions created between 1980 and 2000.

A merger with British Motor Corporation and another company produced the Britsh Leyland Company. Later, it became Rover Group. Currently, it is owned by BMW.

In 2001, BMW introduced the MINI. The MINI currently has three Cooper models. Their main differences being the size of the engine and the horsepower rating. A convertible has also been included to the line-up.


By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2007
For three generations and over 50 years, the Cooper name has identified a MINI offering even more in the way of driving fun. The idea, hatched by brilliant Formula One designer John Cooper, to fuel the agile small car with an extra hit of performance and turn it into a sporting machine for the road and track has lost none of its appeal. But the Cooper has never been about horsepower, as a comparison between the classic Mini and its two successors resoundingly proves. The key here is the basic principle of the creative use of space, combined with the inimitable go-kart feeling that runs like a thread through the three generations of the legendary small car. These famous handling traits are enjoyed by drivers on bendy country roads and city streets around the world, with the classic Mini and 21st-century MINI still regularly crossing each other's path.

The small British car positively craves twists and turns demanding quick and precise changes in direction; this is where it feels most at home. The classic Mini was tailor-made for tackling hairpins and corner-strewn roads, and it still looks the part today – aided by the healthy 46 kW/63 hp available in a Mini Cooper towards the end of its production run. The classic Cooper was built up to autumn 2000, by which time its successor was already twitching in the starting blocks. In contrast to the original Mini, the new model was available in Cooper guise from the outset. And with 85 kW/115 hp under the bonnet, it would do its nameplate proud. From the word go, the car's powerplant and chassis formed a harmonious alliance to deliver unbeatable driving fun. As John Cooper realised, sometimes you actually can't have too much of a good thing. 50 years ago he unveiled the 70 hp Mini Cooper S. And today, its youngest descendant places 135 kW/184 hp at the disposal of its driver. As if that wasn't enough, the turbocharged engine powering the latest MINI Cooper S also sets the benchmark for efficiency in its output class.

When Alec Issigonis set out to develop a new small car for the British Motor Corporation in the mid-1950s, his priorities were space and price. Indeed, at a touch over three metres in length, the classic Mini offered astonishingly generous accommodation for passengers and their gear alike. Issigonis settled on a front transverse installation for the four-cylinder engine, under which lay the gearbox, plumb between the wheels. The positioning of those wheels at the far corners of the car and the Mini's short overhangs did the rest. The Mini was small on the outside but roomy on the inside, not to mention – at around 600 kilograms – extremely light. The principles underpinning its design remain the template for small and compact cars in the modern era.

However, it was left to another key figure in the brand's history to uncover the vast well of sporting talent under that diminutive shell. John Cooper, a friend and business partner of Mini creator Issigonis and winner of two Formula One constructors' world titles, was quick to spot the car's dynamic potential, and in 1961 the first Mini Cooper hit the roads. Production of the Cooper was temporarily suspended in the 1970s, but by that time the Mini Cooper badge had long since become the signature of a sporty and agile small car.

As well as the intervention of John Cooper, the launch of this famous sporting career also relied on the brilliance of the classic Mini's chassis. Issigonis had broken new ground with the steering and suspension of his new creation, and in so doing laid the foundations for the go-kart feeling appreciated by drivers to this day. Homokinetic joints reduced torque steer, a subframe (to which the rear wheels were fixed) improved directional stability, and rubber springs and small telescopic dampers ensured accurate responses and progressive spring action. The wealth of ideas packed into this small car still impresses. And the result of those ideas – the classic Mini's much-celebrated handling – explains why the car continues to enjoy such a loyal community of fans. When the successor to the original car came along in 2001, it was clear that highly advanced chassis technology would be needed in order to set the pace in driving fun all over again. The MINI Cooper rose to the challenge in some style, thanks to MacPherson spring struts at the front axle, axle shafts equal in length, a multi-link rear axle unique in the small car segment, disc brakes on all four wheels, and DSC (Dynamic Stability Control).

The latest-generation MINI Cooper S also features Electric Power Steering with Servotronic function and a DSC system including DTC (Dynamic Traction Control) and an electronic locking function for the front axle differential. Known as Electronic Differential Lock Control (EDLC), this system gives the MINI a crucial edge through the tight bends of Alpine passes, for example, by braking a spinning wheel as required to enhance drive out of corners as well as the car's steering properties. Added to which, pressing the standard Sport Button in the MINI Cooper S makes the steering even more direct and stirs up a particularly sporty soundtrack from the engine. All of this was unimaginable 50 years ago, of course, but you get the impression John Cooper would have wholeheartedly approved.

Source - BMW
Morris Models

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Vehicle information, history, and specifications from concept to production.

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