Packard Super Eight

Packard Super Eight
1948 Packard Super Eight
Produced: 30,405
Original Price: $2,670 - $3,806
Average Auction Sale: $37,659
Chassis Profiles

Packard Super Eight

Packard 1703 Super Eight
1939 Packard 1703 Super Eight
Original Price: $1,650 - $2,130
Average Auction Sale: $81,400
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1705 Super Eight
1939 Packard 1705 Super Eight
Produced: 3,962
Original Price: $2,200 - $2,300
Average Auction Sale: $116,600
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1605 Super Eight
1938 Packard 1605 Super Eight
Produced: 2,478
Original Price: $3,165 - $7,500
Average Auction Sale: $139,167
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1604 Super Eight
1938 Packard 1604 Super Eight
Produced: 2,478
Original Price: $2,900 - $5,800
Average Auction Sale: $126,813
Chassis Profiles
Packard Super Eight
1938 Packard Super Eight
Produced: 2,478
Original Price: $2,800 - $7,500
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1501 Super Eight
1937 Packard 1501 Super Eight
Produced: 5,793
Original Price: $2,400 - $4,865
Average Auction Sale: $67,736
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1502 Super Eight
1937 Packard 1502 Super Eight
Produced: 5,793
Original Price: $2,580 - $5,000
Average Auction Sale: $98,125
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1500 Super Eight
1937 Packard 1500 Super Eight
Produced: 5,793
Original Price: $2,300 - $5,000
Average Auction Sale: $87,324
Chassis Profiles

Packard Super Eight

Packard 1100 Eight
1934 Packard 1100 Eight
Produced: 5,120
Original Price: $2,365
Average Auction Sale: $160,055
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1101
1934 Packard 1101
Produced: 5,120
Original Price: $2,600 - $3,300
Average Auction Sale: $137,161
Chassis Profiles

Packard Super Eight

Packard Model 1404 Super Eight
1936 Packard Model 1404 Super Eight
Produced: 1,330
Original Price: $2,900 - $5,820
Average Auction Sale: $168,774
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1400 Eight
1936 Packard 1400 Eight
Original Price: $2,385
Average Auction Sale: $20,488
Chassis Profiles
Packard Model 1405 Super Eight
1936 Packard Model 1405 Super Eight
Original Price: $3,690 - $4,010
Average Auction Sale: $120,000
Chassis Profiles
Packard Model 1402 Eight
1936 Packard Model 1402 Eight
Produced: 3,973
Original Price: $2,470 - $5,400
Average Auction Sale: $129,417
Chassis Profiles
Packard Model 1401 Eight
1936 Packard Model 1401 Eight
Produced: 3,973
Original Price: $2,485 - $5,200
Average Auction Sale: $78,925
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1201 Eight
1935 Packard 1201 Eight
Original Price: $2,400 - $5,500
Average Auction Sale: $96,554
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1204 Super Eight
1935 Packard 1204 Super Eight
Original Price: $3,000 - $5,700
Average Auction Sale: $132,833
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1105 Super Eight
1934 Packard 1105 Super Eight
Produced: 1,920
Original Price: $3,300 - $7,060
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1104 Super Eight
1934 Packard 1104 Super Eight
Produced: 1,920
Original Price: $3,000 - $3,825
Average Auction Sale: $175,656
Chassis Profiles
Packard 1004 Super Eight
1933 Packard 1004 Super Eight
Produced: 788
Original Price: $2,800 - $3,650
Average Auction Sale: $190,996
Chassis Profiles

Packard Super Eight

Packard Model 900 Light Eight
1932 Packard Model 900 Light Eight
Produced: 6,750
Original Price: $1,760 - $1,895
Average Auction Sale: $143,422
Chassis Profiles

Packard Super Eight

Packard Model 903 Deluxe Eight
1932 Packard Model 903 Deluxe Eight
Produced: 955
Original Price: $3,700 - $45,550
Average Auction Sale: $208,656
Chassis Profiles
Packard Model 902 Eight
1932 Packard Model 902 Eight
Produced: 3,737
Original Price: $2,655 - $3,450
Average Auction Sale: $101,696
Chassis Profiles
Packard Model 904 DeLuxe Eight
1932 Packard Model 904 DeLuxe Eight
Produced: 700
Original Price: $4,200 - $7,250
Average Auction Sale: $714,299
Chassis Profiles
Packard Model 833 Standard Eight
1931 Packard Model 833 Standard Eight
Produced: 6,096
Original Price: $2,400 - $3,475
Average Auction Sale: $78,440
Chassis Profiles
In 1932 the Packard Standard eight engine was updated with a redesigned manifold and fan. The compression ratio was increased to 6.0:1 and now produced 100 horsepower. A redesigned air cleanser improved both noise and vibration, and the fitting of new rubber engine mounts was accomplished by the driveshaft being jointed and rubber mounted. Both the components and the lengthened chassis were redesigned.

Created out of economic necessity, the Packard Light Eight was introduced in early 1932 and was the first newly designed Packard since 1923. It was also the first medium-priced Packard that was intended to sell in higher volume to help consumers in the luxury market ride out the Depression. Built with the same meticulous care as any Packard, the Light Eight sold for $500-$850 less than the Standard Eight.

Unfortunately though, despite its 'Light' name, the Light Eight used the same 320-cubic-inch engine that was in the Standard Eight, though it rode the shortest wheelbase, 127.5 inches. The Light Eight was sold in coupe roadster and sedan, four-door sedan, and rumble seat coupe.

All new Packard models for the 1949 model year featured a 'flow through fender'. The Packard station wagon was considered by many to be one of the most stylish wagons of the time period. For 1949 the Packard Standard Eight featured a fold down rear seat that made the vehicle quickly transform the station wagon from a functional utility vehicle into a passenger car.

The Packard Straight Eight was equipped with a three-speed manual transmission and was capable of producing 135 horsepower. Both the driver and the passengers enjoyed the bump-free smooth ride in the Standard Eight.

Between 1948 and 1950 only 3,865 Packard Station Sedans were ever produced. Today this vehicle is an extremely collectible piece of the Packard Motor Car Company legacy.

The 1950 Packard Standard Eight featured avante-garde styling along with strong, sturdy vertical wooden slats on the doors. The ‘woodie wagon' was formed by taking a six passenger sedan from the assembly line, then changing the roofline and trunk lid. Briggs Manufacturing Company transformed the once sedan into a complete station wagon. The Packard Standard Eight featured 288 cubic inch straight eight.

By Jessica Donaldson

Related Articles and History

Super Eight History

The Packard Motor Company relied on making luxurious cars that were highly refined, fitted with luxurious coachwork, and powered by proven engineering. This belief had placed them among the elite in the auto industry during the early 1900s. As the world entered the Great Depression, the Packard Company was one of the few that managed to survive. In fact, they outsold all of their competitors combined. They had entered the Depression in excellent financial health and they emerged with strong financial footing. But the post depression era had them worried, as the number of potential buyers had dwindled as fortunes were lost. Production had dropped nearly half each year when compared with the previous, from 1929 to 1933. In response to the decline, Packard continued to make improvements each year.

In 1932, Packard introduced their Ninth Series. It featured many improvements which helped segregate it from other automakers in the industry. Improvements included a revised steering geometry which made steering smooth and easy. Braking was equally as easy thanks to the new driver adjustable power assisted braking system. The shifting action and clutch were improved making driving a very enjoyable activity. The drivers workload was eased even further with the spark advance and automatic choke.

By making these changes they attracted a growing segment of buyers and drivers - woman.

The 1933 Packard's were called the Tenth Series cars as the company still refused to adopt the convention of the model year system which called for new cars to be introduced in September or October to coincide with the auto show schedules. The following year, the reluctantly joined with other manufacturers which resulted in a shorted run for the tenth series, lasting just seven months. The new Packard model line was introduced in the fall. Because of the seven month production lifespan of the Tenth Series, very few were produced making them very rare in modern times.

The Tenth Series were given a new X-braced frames, dual coil ignition, and downdraft carburetors. The styling was updated with skirted fenders and a 'V'-shaped radiator shell. The interior featured upgraded trim and a new aircraft inspired dash.

Packard continued to offer three chassis, the Eight, Super Eight, and the Twelve. The Super Eight and Twelve both rested on a wheelbase that measured 142-inches and had a hood that was nearly six-inches longer than the Eight. The fenders were longer as well.

The bodies on the Twelve's and Super Eight were interchangeable, with the Super Eight featuring an eight-cylinder engine while the Twelve featured a twelve cylinder engine. During this time, Packard also produced the Eight, which had a smaller wheelbase size and the eight-cylinder engine. The Super Eight and Twelve differed by interior appointments and engine size. The bodies were constructed of wood and steel.

In 1936 Packard was producing their Fourteenth Series as the number thirteen had been skipped. It is believed that thirteen was not used due to superstitious reasons. The Fourteenth Series was the last year for Bijur lubrication, ride control, a semi-elliptic suspension, mechanical brakes, heavy vibration dampening bumpers and the 384.4 cubic inch straight eight engine. It was also the last year for the option of wire or wood wheels.

In 1936 the fourteenth series received a new radiator which was installed at a five-degree angle. The Super 8 had a new sloped grille with chrome vertical bars which gave the vehicle a unique look and served as thermostatically controlled shutters which opened or closed based on engine heat. The headlight trim, fender styling, and hood vents saw minor changes. A new Delco-Remy ignition system was the new updates for 1936 under the bonnet.

For 1936 there were a total of 1,492 Super Eights constructed.


By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008
Packard Models

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