Ford Custom Series
Ford Custom 300 Series
Ford Custom 300 Series
The intermediate trim level 'Customline Series' became the 'Custom' series in 1957 and moved further down-market, and becoming Ford's base trim level. They included chrome window moldings, one sun visor, and no horn - there was a horn button. The Custom Series was offered with either a six or eight-cylinder engine with the Custom 300 Models being the top of the line trim for the Custom short-wheelbase series.

The car was available as a two- or four-door sedan and a two-door business coupe with seating for three. The pricing ranged from $1880 to $2260. Those figures were adjusted as the years continued. The Custom Series was produced until 1959. For 1960, Ford redesigned its vehicle lineup with the Fairlane moving into the position of the base level trim.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2008
Ford Customline
Ford Customline
Ford Custom Deluxe
Ford Custom Deluxe
Ford Custom Series
World War II put automobile production on hold. Production ceased on February 10, 1942, and resumed in 1946. When production began, most vehicles offered by marques were basically carried over from pre-War development. It was not until 1949 until Ford began offering new designs. They featured simple lines that were clean and well-integrated into the body. In the front was a dramatic and artful bullet nosed grille.

The Custom Deluxe Series was introduced in 1950 and would continue for a total of two years. The Custom Deluxe Crestliner two-door sedan was Ford's top-of-the-line offering and included chrome window moldings, chrome horn rings, armrests on all doors, and two sun visors. Needless to say, there was chrome at nearly every available location. Two engines were available, a six- and eight-cylinder unit. The L-head six-cylinder unit produced 95 horsepower while the L-head V8 produced 100 horsepower. The standard gearbox was a three-speed manual; an optional three-speed manual with automatic overdrive was optional

The cars rested on a 114-inch wheelbase and passenger cars measured 196.6 inches. Station wagons were slightly larger, measuring 206 inches.

The Crestliner was a two-door special sedan that had a vinyl top covering. There was extra chrome, special steering wheel, full wheel covers and special paint.
By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2009
Model Production *
* Please note, dates are approximate

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