Mercedes-Benz S-Class

Mercedes-Benz S-Class
2014 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
Average Auction Sale: $44,633
Median Auction Sale: $49,500
Mercedes-Benz S400 Hybrid
2013 Mercedes-Benz S400 Hybrid
MSRP: $92,350-$212,000
Invoice: $85,886-$197,160
Mercedes-Benz S550
2013 Mercedes-Benz S550
MSRP: $92,350-$212,000
Invoice: $85,886-$197,160
Mercedes-Benz S600
2013 Mercedes-Benz S600
MSRP: $92,350-$212,000
Invoice: $85,886-$197,160
Mercedes-Benz S-Class
2012 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
MSRP: $91,850-$210,900
Invoice: $85,425-$196,135
Average Auction Sale: $39,675
Median Auction Sale: $39,675
Mercedes-Benz S-Class
2011 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
MSRP: $91,000-$209,000
Invoice: $84,635-$194,375
Average Auction Sale: $28,938
Median Auction Sale: $28,875
Mercedes-Benz S 63 AMG Showcar
2010 Mercedes-Benz S 63 AMG Showcar
Average Auction Sale: $97,251
Median Auction Sale: $97,251
Mercedes-Benz S Class
2010 Mercedes-Benz S Class
Average Auction Sale: $18,081
Median Auction Sale: $14,713
Mercedes-Benz S Class
2008 Mercedes-Benz S Class
Original Price: $86,700
Average Auction Sale: $23,255
Median Auction Sale: $19,350
Mercedes-Benz S Class
2007 Mercedes-Benz S Class
Average Auction Sale: $24,157
Median Auction Sale: $22,000

Mercedes-Benz S-Class

Mercedes-Benz S Class
2006 Mercedes-Benz S Class
Original Price: $65,675
Average Auction Sale: $13,304
Median Auction Sale: $10,250
Mercedes-Benz S65 AMG
2006 Mercedes-Benz S65 AMG
Average Auction Sale: $28,394
Median Auction Sale: $26,000
Brabus S V12 Biturbo
2006 Brabus S V12 Biturbo
Original Price: $65,675
Mercedes-Benz S-Class
2005 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
Original Price: $76,020
Average Auction Sale: $14,320
Median Auction Sale: $11,130
Carlsson S-Class
2005 Carlsson S-Class
Average Auction Sale: $25,100
Median Auction Sale: $25,100
Mercedes-Benz S-Class
2004 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
Average Auction Sale: $16,130
Median Auction Sale: $12,650
Mercedes-Benz S Class
2003 Mercedes-Benz S Class
Original Price: $73,000
Average Auction Sale: $20,282
Median Auction Sale: $16,000
Mercedes-Benz S-Class
2001 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
Original Price: $70,800 - $114,000
Average Auction Sale: $11,360
Median Auction Sale: $10,000
Mercedes-Benz S500
2000 Mercedes-Benz S500
Original Price: $82,052
Average Auction Sale: $12,190
Median Auction Sale: $10,010
Mercedes-Benz S-Class
2000 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
Original Price: $69,700 - $77,850
Average Auction Sale: $9,606
Median Auction Sale: $7,350

Mercedes-Benz S-Class

Mercedes-Benz S-Class
1999 Mercedes-Benz S-Class
Original Price: $64,750 - $132,250
Average Auction Sale: $6,778
Median Auction Sale: $5,533

Mercedes-Benz S-Class


Total Production: 146
Ferdinand Porsche designed the S-Type for Mercedes-Benz in 1927. The racer was constructed using pre-existing road version Mercedes vehicles, mainly the 400 and 630 models. The names of these vehicles came from their displacement size in liters. For example, the 400 had a four liter engine while the 630 had a 6.3 liter engine, both were equipped a supercharger and six-cylinders. The engine was one of the most appealing attributes of these vehicles. The drawbacks that robbed the vehicles of performance were its size, weight and basic suspension system. A cushy suspension and large size was ideal for luxury vehicles that carried the elite in society, but at the track the vehicles were in need of more performance characteristics. An attempt was made to enhance the sporty nature of the 630 by shortening the wheelbase, which brought about the 'short' (Kurz) version. This drastically improved the vehicles sporty appeal but more was needed to enhance the handling. Mercedes answer to this problem was the S-Type version which saw the chassis lowered and the engine moved back. This improved the vehicles balance. To improve its performance, the engine capacity was enlarged to 6.8 liters. Thus, the 680 S was born.

The Nurburgring 1000 km race debuted in 1927. The track is challenging with it 172 turns and 25.6 km length. The track tests both the driver and the vehicle in all scenarios such as power, braking, and cornering. At the first Nurburgring race it was the 680 S that emerged victorious, a true testament to the vehicles capabilities.

Future versions of the S-Type followed such as the 700 and 710 SS which saw horsepower ratings in the 225 range. Most were considered road going cars but there was little to distinguish a car that was meant for the track and one that was meant for the road. Obviously, the vehicles fitted with luxurious coachwork never saw any track time but the roadsters, speedsters, and coupes (for example) could be used for dual purposes.
By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2007

Mercedes-Benz S-Class

Mercedes-Benz SSK
1927 Mercedes-Benz SSK
Average Auction Sale: $240,435
Median Auction Sale: $240,435
Chassis Profiles

Total Production: 38
In 1928 the Mercedes SSK was introduced and commonly referred to as 'The Mighty Mercedes' and 'The Fastest Sports Car in the World'. The name SSK stands for Super Sport Kurz, German meaning short. The naming convention for the SSK typically has numbers associated with them, such as 700 and 710. This represents the engine capacity, 7.0 liter and 7.1 liter respectively. It used a modified version of the Ferdinand Porsche designed S-type chassis that, when compared with the S and SS models, was about 19 inches shorter. The K-Type was mechanically identical to the four-seat 'touring' car, the SS. The vehicle had been lowered and the engine moved back to capitalize on better weight distribution. The vehicle was powered by a variety of engines including the 7.1 liter supercharged engine that produced 225 horsepower, and later 250 horsepower. There was room for a driver and passenger, spare tires, and tools.

The bodywork was mostly handled by the factory but often outfitted by European and American coachbuilders such Murphy.

The final series was the SSKL. By drilling holes in the chassis, the weight of the vehicle was decreased even further, although weakened the frame causing many to break. The engine became more powerful, now producing 300 horsepower. It was successfully campaigned in 1931 but a year later was unable to challenge modern vehicles like the Alfa Romeo 8C 2300.

During its production run, lasting from 1928 through 1932, between 31 and 35 examples were built with around half being factory-designated Rennwagens, or race cars.
By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2006
Model Production *
* Please note, dates are approximate

Related Articles and History
Mercedes-Benz Models


Vehicle information, history, and specifications from concept to production.

Follow ConceptCarz on Facebook Follow ConceptCarz on Twitter RSS News Feed

Conceptcarz.com
© 1998-2020 Conceptcarz.com Reproduction or reuse prohibited without written consent.