6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato

Alfa Romeo 6C 2500
1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500
Original Price: $10,005
Average Auction Sale: $441,354
Chassis Profiles
Alfa Romeo 6C 2500
1950 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500
Original Price: $10,005
Average Auction Sale: $681,027
Chassis Profiles

Total Production: 28

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato


Total Production: 3

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato


Total Production: 779

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato

The engine in the 1927 Alfa Romeo 6C 1500 was the basis for a series of engines that would eventually define the marque as one of the great manufacturers of the pre-war era. The Vittorio Jano designed engine was expanded to 1752cc and became the 6C 1750 which, in various bodystyles and tune, would become the backbone of Alfa Romeo production from 1929 to 1933. Two additional cylinders were later added, becoming the 8C 2300 and ultimately the 8C 2900.

In 1934, Jano introduced a new generation of Alfa Romeo engines, the dual overhead camshaft 6C 2300. The unit had a bore that measured 70mm and a stroke of 100mm. The long stroke gave the engine high torque for drivability. It was given hallow camshafts for superior lubrication resulting in better reliability. There was an improved light alloy cylinder head with chain-driven camshafts. Also adding to the reliability were the seven main bearings, single-piece block and head castings, plus a dual-level sump that acted as an oil cooler.

In 1939, the bore was increased to 72mm, resulting in the 6C 2500 with 2,443cc displacement. This engine was mounted in brilliant chassis's that were a reflection of the company's history in Grand Prix competition. At both the front and rear were an independent suspension with parallel trailing arms at the front and swing axles at the rear. Coil springs could be found in the front and torsion bars in the back.

Most of the 6C models were given custom coachwork.
By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2009

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato


Total Production: 211
The 2.3-liter version of Vittorio Jano's engine was a continuation of excellence and perfection. The 1500 was the first increment, and it truly created recognition for the Italian based manufacturer. The 1750 and 1900 soon followed, then came the 2300 which offered just over 70 horsepower initially. Its construction was very similar to its predecessors, utilizing two overhead camshafts actuating two valves for each cylinder. It was formed using a cast-iron block and light-alloy head and mated to a four-speed gearbox with drum brakes on all four corners.

The first car to house the 2300 engine was the 63 2300 which made its inaugural debut at the 1934 Milan Motorshow. The body was courtesy of Castagna in four-door saloon configuration. A short-wheelbase Gran Turismo version soon followed, as did a higher compression version of the engine offering nearly 100 horsepower. These sporty versions were called the Pescara model and only sixty examples would ever be produced. The long wheelbase versions were called the Turismo's, the shorter Gran Turismos were known as the Pescara's. Within a few years, they would simply be known as the SWB and LWB for 'short' and 'long' wheelbase respectively.

Time brings about improvement, and very little time transpired before a 'B' version was introduced. In 1935 the 6C 2300B was introduced which brought new changes to the suspension and chassis, and mild improvements to the already potent powerplant. The suspension was independent in both the front and rear with swing axles in the rear and wishbones in the front.

In 1937 a Pescara emerged from the Mille Miglia with a class victory; in its honor the Pescara's name was changed to MM.

Production of the 2300 continued until 1939 when it was replaced by the 6C 2500 which would remain in production, except during war time, until 1952.
By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2007In the early 1930s, Alfa Romeo was in financial trouble. It was rescued by the Italian government who took control of the company in 1933 through the Istituto Riconstruzione Industriale (IRI). The day-to-day operation of the racing program was given to Enzo Ferrari. With the racing program well managed and the concerns of the marketplace put to rest, the Alfa Romeo engineers were free to create some of the most elegant and technology advanced vehicles of their day.

The Alfa Romeo 6C 2300 was introduced in 1934. They featured a dual overhead cam six-cylinder engine that produced nearly 70 horsepower. This figure rose rather quickly as racing versions soon emerged, bringing horsepower closer to 100 bhp. With the help of Enzo Ferrari, the 6C 2300 did well in competition; its first victory made at the Targa Abruzzo distance races in Pescara in 1934 where they swept the field. In honor of this accomplishment, a small series of these were produced as the 6C 2300 Pescara.

For 1935, the 6C 2300 was given hydraulic brakes, a fully independent suspension, and a lighter, more modern chassis. These changes resulted in a name change, now dubbed the 6C 2300B. Future changes to the series included a new gearbox with Synchromesh on the third and top gear and improved frame mountings.

The top-of-the-line 6C 2300B was Mille Miglia version, built on the short chassis with a 105 horsepower engine. Perhaps the most memorable were those clothed by Carrozzeria Touring, one of which took first place in the Turismo class of the 1937 Millle Miglia and 4th overall. There were only 107 examples of the 6C 2300B MM produced between 1938 and 1939.
By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2009

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato


Total Production: 60
The 2.3-liter version of Vittorio Jano's engine was a continuation of excellence and perfection. The 1500 was the first increment, and it truly created recognition for the Italian based manufacturer. The 1750 and 1900 soon followed, then came the 2300 which offered just over 70 horsepower initially. Its construction was very similar to its predecessors, utilizing two overhead camshafts actuating two valves for each cylinder. It was formed using a cast-iron block and light-alloy head and mated to a four-speed gearbox with drum brakes on all four corners.

The first car to house the 2300 engine was the 63 2300 which made its inaugural debut at the 1934 Milan Motorshow. The body was courtesy of Castagna in four-door saloon configuration. A short-wheelbase Gran Turismo version soon followed, as did a higher compression version of the engine offering nearly 100 horsepower. These sporty versions were called the Pescara model and only sixty examples would ever be produced. The long wheelbase versions were called the Turismo's, the shorter Gran Turismos were known as the Pescara's. Within a few years, they would simply be known as the SWB and LWB for 'short' and 'long' wheelbase respectively.

Time brings about improvement, and very little time transpired before a 'B' version was introduced. In 1935 the 6C 2300B was introduced which brought new changes to the suspension and chassis, and mild improvements to the already potent powerplant. The suspension was independent in both the front and rear with swing axles in the rear and wishbones in the front.

In 1937 a Pescara emerged from the Mille Miglia with a class victory; in its honor the Pescara's name was changed to MM.

Production of the 2300 continued until 1939 when it was replaced by the 6C 2500 which would remain in production, except during war time, until 1952.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2010

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato


Total Production: 2,579
In 1929 the 6C 1750 was created as a replacement for the aging 6C 1500. The name, 6C 1750, was a combination of the six-cylinder engine and the 1752 cc engine displacement. The 1750 continued the strong racing legacy Alfa Romeo had established with their P2 Grand Prix car and the 1500. The design for the Sport editions were simply yet sophisticated. They used a light frame coupled with a small inline-six cylinder supercharged engine capable of producing nearly 100 horsepower.

The 1750 was created in 1929 and produced until 1933, during this time nearly 2500 examples were created. There were six series each achieving a higher level of sophistication over the prior series. As was the case with many manufacturers at the time, Alfa Romeo supplied the rolling chassis and commissioned coachbuilders such as Zagato, Touring, Stablimenti Farina, Castagna, and James Young to finish the body. The result was a wide range of specifications and creativity.

The design was handled by Vittorio Jano, an individual Enzo Ferrari, an employee of Alfa Romeo, had been able to lure from Fiat. Jano had been tasked with designing the 6C 1500 which had been powered by a six-cylinder engine. He was then tasked with designing the 6C 1750 which was debuted at the 1929 Rome Motorshow. It shared many similarities with its predecessor; the biggest difference being an enlarged engine. Because of the larger engine it was capable of being outfitted with larger, heavier bodies.

The first version of the 1750 was the Turismo. The second version was the Sport which sat atop a shorter wheelbase and was given an improved engine. The most powerful and competitive versions of the 1750 was the Super Sport or Gran Sport. In this form they were often campaigned by the factory and privateers in a plethora of sporting events. They were equipped with supercharged engines and sat atop a short wheelbase. Most of the 360 examples received coachwork courtesy of Zagato, mainly because of the lightweight design. Only 44 examples of the sixth series Gran Sport were produced. The Gran Sport was successfully campaigned at events like the Mille Miglia, Targa Florio, and Tourist Trophy where it emerged victorious.

In 1931 the 8C 2300 replaced the Gran Sport. The 1750 Gran Sport is one of the finest sporting examples of its time. The 1750 continued Alfa Romeo's reputation for fun-to-drive vehicles that were competitive and durable.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2008

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Zagato

http://www.sportscarmarket.com/Profiles/2007/November/Etceterini/
http://www.alfaworkshop.co.uk/alfa-romeo-6c-1750.shtml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfa_Romeo_6C

Founded on June 24, 1910 in Milan, the Alfa Romeo Automobiles S.p.A. had been a part of the Fiat Group since 1986 and since February 2007 is had been part of Fiat Group Automobiles S.p.A. The Alfa Romeo Company has been known initially as A.L.F.A., which was an acronym for Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili which in English was Lombard Automobile Factory, Public Company. In 1906 the company that became Alfa Romeo was founded as Società Anonima Italiana Darracq (SAID) by the French automobile firm of Alexandre Darracq with several Italian investors. In 1909, Cavaliera Ugo Stella (one of the investors) became chairman of the SAID. Originally the firm's location was in Naples, but Darracq decided late in 1906 to move the factory to Milan in a suburb of Portello.

The Italian Darracq cars were selling very slowly in late 1909, and Stella with other with other co-investors founded a new company named A.L.F.A. originally still in partnership with Darracq. In 1919 the first non-Darracq vehicle produced was the 1910 24 HP, designed by Giuseppe Merosi who was hired in 1909 to design new cars that were more suitable to the Italian market. Eventually Merosi would design a series of new A.L.F.A. cars with even more powerful engines, from 40-60 HP. A.L.F.A. even ventured into motor racing with drivers Franchini and Ronzoni competing in the 1911 Targa Floria with two 24 HP models. Three years later an advanced Grand Prix car was designed and constructed, the GP1914 featured a four-cylinder, double overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and twin ignition. Unfortunately, the onset of WWI halted automobile production at A.L.F.A. for three years.

Utilized on road, race and sports cars constructed between 1925 and1954 was the Alfa Romeo 6C name. The designation 6C refers to a straight 6 engine. Coachbuilders like Zagato, Touring Castagna, Pininfarina and James Young constructed these bodies. From 1933 there was also a 6C version with a factory Alfa body built in Portello.

Alfa's RL was considered by many to be too cumbersome and heavy in the mid-1920's so a new development began. For the 1926 season the 2-liter formula that had lead to Alfa Romeo winning the World Championship in 1925 was updated to 1,5 liter. In 1925 the 6C1500 was introduced at Milan and production began in 1927 with the P2 Grand Prix car as a starting point. The engine capacity was now at 1487 cc, compared to the P2's 1987 cc, while the supercharging was dropped. The initial versions were bodied by Young and Touring.

A 6C Sport was introduced in 1928 with a dual overhead camshaft engine. The sports version was numerous racing, including the 1928 Mille Miglia. With the 200 with DOHC engine the total production was 2000. Ten versions of a supercharged Super Sport variant were also made.

In 1929 a much more powerful 6C 1750cc was introduced in 1929 in Rome. The base model had a single overhead cam; Super Sport and Gran Sport versions had DOHC. A supercharger was also available. Total production was 369 units.

In 1933 the final derivative of the original 1500 version of the 6C 1900 with a 1917 cc engine was introduced, with an aluminum head for the first time. This version could achieve top speed of 130 kilometers per hour with 68 brake horsepower. Incredibly rare, this 1900 version was produced in only 197 copies before it was replaced by 6C 2300.

A less expensive alternative to the 8C, the 6C 2300 was designed by Vittorio Jano from 1934 until 1937. The 6C 2500 was introduced in 1938 until 1952 and it was the final 6C road car. WWII disrupted car development, but a few hundred 6C 2500's were constructed from 1940 until 1945. Following the war, the first new Alfa model was the 1946 6C 2500 Freccia d'Oro. A total of 680 units were built through 1950, and the body done by Alfa. The ‘Golden Arrow' was sold to affluent customers like King Farouk, Rita Hayworth, Prince Rainier, Ali Khan and Tyrone Power.

In 1949 the 6C 2500 Villa d'Este was introduced and was produced until 1952. It was named for the Concorso d'Eleganza held in villa d'Este, a Touring Superleggera-bodied version was awarded the prize. The Villa d'Este was Alfa's final hand built model and only 36 examples were made. The final 6C was produced in 1952 and was replaced by the 1900.

The 6C 2500 was introduced in 1952 and was one of five long wheelbase automobiles produced by Touring of Italy. In 1950 a 6C 3000 prototype was constructed, and was basically a 2500 with a 3L engine.

This prototype didn't appear until 1952, as the Competizione Maggiorata, which was built for racing, with a 3.5L engine, in four coupe and two spider versions. The 6C 3000 was produced from 1950 until 1954. A coachbuilder from Milan, the body was shaped by Carrozzeria Colli with some of the style reminiscent of the 1900 DiscoVolante. The propulsion system of this particular model came from a project by Giuseppe Busso. This model differed from its ancestor yet it still utilized various components of the 3-liters-volume/6-cylinders system from the 6C 3000 prototype. The engine capacity was increased to 3495 cc. Following several updates, the power was increased to 275 bhp.

By Jessica Donaldson

Related Articles and History
In 1929 the 6C 1750 was created as a replacement for the aging 6C 1500. The name, 6C 1750, was a combination of the six-cylinder engine and the 1752 cc engine displacement. The 1750 continued the strong racing legacy Alfa Romeo had established with their P2 Grand Prix car and the 1500. The design for the Sport editions were simply yet sophisticated. They used a light frame coupled with a small inline-six cylinder supercharged engine capable of producing nearly 100 horsepower.
The 1750 was created in 1929 and produced until 1933, during this time nearly 2500 examples were created. There were six series each achieving a higher level of sophistication over the prior series. As was the case with many manufacturers at the time, Alfa Romeo supplied the rolling chassis and commissioned coachbuilders such as Zagato, Touring, Stablimenti Farina, Castagna, and James Young to finish the body. The result was a wide range of specifications and creativity.

The design was handled by Vittorio Jano, an individual Enzo Ferrari, an employee of Alfa Romeo, had been able to lure from Fiat. Jano had been tasked with designing the 6C 1500 which had been powered by a six-cylinder engine. He was then tasked with designing the 6C 1750 which was debuted at the 1929 Rome Motorshow. It shared many similarities with its predecessor; the biggest difference being an enlarged engine. Because of the larger engine it was capable of being outfitted with larger, heavier bodies.

The first version of the 1750 was the Turismo. The second version was the Sport which sat atop a shorter wheelbase and was given an improved engine. The most powerful and competitive versions of the 1750 was the Super Sport or Gran Sport. In this form they were often campaigned by the factory and privateers in a plethora of sporting events. They were equipped with supercharged engines and sat atop a short wheelbase. Most of the 360 examples received coachwork courtesy of Zagato, mainly because of the lightweight design. Only 44 examples of the sixth series Gran Sport were produced. The Gran Sport was successfully campaigned at events like the Mille Miglia, Targa Florio, and Tourist Trophy where it emerged victorious.

In 1931 the 8C 2300 replaced the Gran Sport. The 1750 Gran Sport is one of the finest sporting examples of its time. The 1750 continued Alfa Romeo's reputation for fun-to-drive vehicles that were competitive and durable.


By Daniel Vaughan | Jun 2006
The Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 was introduced near the end of the 1930's. The 6C name was derived from the engine size, an inline-six while the 2500 represented the engines cubic-centimeter displacement size.

The engine was a version of Vittorio Jano designed six-cylinder engine. The 6C was available in a plethora of body styles and wheelbases and was produced during two different times in history. Most of the coachwork was handled by Touring of Italy or by Pinin Farina. The body styles ranged from coupes and convertible to four-seater salon. In 1939 Alfa Romeo introduced the SS version, a short-wheelbase model, dubbed 'SS' for Super Sport, that had a high-compression 6C engine rated at 105 horsepower. It was the top-of-the line 6C model that married style and performance together to create the perfect road-going vehicle.

World War II had interrupted production for many automobile manufacturers. During this time many switched their efforts to support the war, such as building engines for marine and aircraft or by producing vehicles that were suitable for war time. When Alfa Romeo resumed production, their vehicles were similar to those they had offered in 1939. The main difference was that Alfa Romeo now bodied the cars themselves rather than providing the rolling chassis for custom coachbuilders to body. The designs had become standard but they were still based on sketches and designs produced by coachbuilders such as Pinin Farina and Touring. Pinin Farina built the exclusive bodies such as the Cabriolet. These vehicles were elegant and stylish and had a price tag that matched. Touring built the Coupes which became known as the Villa d'Este in 1949 after winning the famous Concours d'Elegance Villa d'Este. When outfitted with the Superleggera, meaning light weight, bodies they were capable of speed of over 100 mph.

The engines were similar to the Jano designed six-cylinder power plant, capable of producing 110 horsepower. Independent suspension was installed to soften the ride while improving performance and handling characteristics. A four-speed manual transmission was similar to the one used prior to the onset of the war.

The history of the Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 automobiles are extensive. The various designs and body-styles matched with their mechanical capabilities make these one of the finest Alfa Romeos ever produced.


By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2006


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