Ferrari 308 GT/M


Total Production: 3
During the late 1970s, the costs and technical demands required to stay competitive in Formula One competition continued to escalate. Ferrari focused its efforts and resources on this singular competition arena and increasingly formalized its relationship with the Michelotto tuning and racing organization, which owned the official Ferrari service center in Padua, Italy. Since the company's inception in 1969, Michelotto had built a reputation for its outstanding race-car preparation and dominant performance, eventually becoming in effect a 'semi-works' arm of Ferrari. When customers approached Ferrari with the idea of building a Group 4 rally version of the 308 GTB, the company directed them to Michelotto. Their Ferrari Dino-powered Lancia Stratos won a succession of Italian rally championships. After the Stratos' retirement, Ferrari's new V-8 powered 308 GTB was Michelotto's choice for 1978, since it had already been homologated by Ferrari for FIA Group 4 rally competition. The privately developed cars were impressive enough to convince Ferrari to partner with Michelotto to construct a Group B car towards the close of 1982.

The new Group B 'evoluzione' was relatively unrestricted and allowed Michelotto to take the basic 308 GTB to the extreme. The mid-mounted V8 engine was turned from a transverse placement to a new longitudinal position within the tubular chassis allowing ease of access to the engine and gearbox. The lowered engine placement also gave the car a low center of gravity. Production-based underpinnings were modified for competition use. The engine was based on the 308 GTB road car engine, using the alloy cylinder block and the new Quattrovalvole four-valve cylinder heads, plus competition-spec pistons, cams, and valves. It was given a custom fuel delivery system utilizing a Kugelfischer pump and Bosch injectors. The 370 horsepower produced by the engine was delivered to the rear wheels via a five-speed Hewland competition gearbox.

The first chassis was completed in 1983. It wore a body created from carbon-fiber composite and Kevlar panels from a hand-formed aluminum buck. Its design was similar to that of the 512 BBLM GT. The show wheelbase car had short front and rear overhands, radically flared rear fenders, a tall rear wing, and plenty of cooling vents. The entire package weighed just 1,850 lbs.

This new Group B competition car was designated 308 GT/M, with the 'M' representing 'Michelotto.' The 308 GT/M, developed jointly by Ferrari and Michelotto, was tested at Ferrari's Fiorano circuit.

The first example, chassis 001, was purchased by Jean 'Beurlys' Blaton of Belgium. The second 308 GT/M was raced just once, at the 1984 Rally di Monza, where driver Lele Pinto proved the car's potential by leading the event. Unfortunately, it was forced to retire after it was involved in an accident.

The Ferrari 308 GT/M was fast and competitive, but soon eclipsed by turbocharged, all-wheel-drive competitors that would take rally competition to new levels, eventually resulting in the cancellation of Group B altogether after the Tour de Corse in 1986.

A third GT/M was later built for a Dutch buyer, using the remaining spare parts still on hand.
By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2015

Ferrari 308 GT/M

Ferrari 308 GTBi
1982 Ferrari 308 GTBi
Original Price: $51,940
Average Auction Sale: $42,810
The Pininfarina designed Ferrari 308 was debut in 1975 and was immediately a success. The vehicles performance, handling, and styling were phenomenal.

For the initial 18 months of the 308 GTB's production, fiberglass was predominately used for the bodies, but later switched to all-metal. The fiberglass bodies were around 125 kg lighter.

The 308 was capable of producing 255 bhp from its 3 liter, V8, carburetor engine. In 1980, a Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system was installed due to new emission regulations. This caused the horsepower to drop to around 215 hp, thus making the 308 GTBi the slowest of the 308 series.

In 1981, Ferrari introduced 4 valve heads for the 3 liter V8's. This 308's now became known as 308 GTB/GTS Quattrovalvole. The engine now produced 240 BHP, and with the extra weight that was imposed due to using all-metal rather than fiberglass, the performance and handling was back to where it was when it began production.

In 1985, Ferrari introduced the 328 GTB/GTS. A vehicle that came equipped with a 3185 cc engine that produced 270 BHP.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2006

Ferrari 308 GT/M

Ferrari 208 GT4 Dino
1977 Ferrari 208 GT4 Dino
Original Price: $23,885
Average Auction Sale: $36,503
Chassis Profiles

Total Production: 840
The Ferrari 308/208 Series was the first production cars to feature a mid-engine layout and wear the prancing horse badges. First introduced in October of 1975, the Pininfarina designed 308 drew its styling from the 246 and 365 Dino. It was powered by a V8 engine rather than the traditional V12.

The 208 GT4 was introduced in 1975 and was powered by a low-displacement version of the eight-cylinder engine in 308 GT4. The double overhead cam engine with four two-barrel Weber carburetors produced a respectable 180 horsepower, and was capable of carrying the vehicle to a top speed of around 130 miles per hour. Performance was further enhanced by the five-speed synchromesh gearbox, four-wheel independent suspension, and disc brakes. The small 92.1 inch wheelbase with an excellent weight-distribution design provided excellent handing and performance on the motorways.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2006

Ferrari 308 GT/M

Ferrari 308 Quattrovalvole
1985 Ferrari 308 Quattrovalvole
Original Price: $59,500
Average Auction Sale: $61,366
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308 GTB
1984 Ferrari 308 GTB
Original Price: $54,300
Average Auction Sale: $77,000
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308
1980 Ferrari 308
Original Price: $40,580 - $44,910
Average Auction Sale: $46,795
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308 GTB
1979 Ferrari 308 GTB
Original Price: $28,585
Average Auction Sale: $58,239
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308 GTB
1978 Ferrari 308 GTB
Original Price: $28,588
Average Auction Sale: $91,630
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308 GTB
1977 Ferrari 308 GTB
Original Price: $28,580
Average Auction Sale: $83,020
Chassis Profiles
The Pininfarina designed Ferrari 308 was debut in 1975 and was immediately a success. The vehicles performance, handling, and styling were phenomenal.

For the initial 18 months of the 308 GTB's production, fiberglass was predominately used for the bodies, but later switched to all-metal. The fiberglass bodies were around 125 kg lighter.

The 308 was capable of producing 255 bhp from its 3 liter, V8, carburetor engine. In 1980, a Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system was installed due to new emission regulations. This caused the horsepower to drop to around 215 hp, thus making the 308 GTBi the slowest of the 308 series.

In the early 1980s, Ferrari introduced 4 valve heads for the 3 liter V8's. This 308's now became known as 308 GTB/GTS Quattrovalvole. The engine now produced 240 BHP, and with the extra weight that was imposed due to using all-metal rather than fiberglass, the performance and handling was back to where it was when it began production.

In 1985, Ferrari introduced the 328 GTB/GTS. A vehicle that came equipped with a 3185 cc engine that produced 270 BHP.
By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2011One of the most well-respected Ferraris to ever roll out of Maranello was the Dino 246, an irony when one considers the car's position in its parent brand's model lineup. An entry level vehicle with only half the cylinders of its famous big brothers, the Dino wasn't even branded as a Ferrari—it wore no prancing horse motifs and had a yellow 'Dino' badge on its nose in place of the familiar, upright rectangle. It was drop-dead gorgeous, though, and it drove with athletic grace. It inspired a new class of mid-engined Ferrari sports cars that often out-handled their more expensive (and more expansive) siblings. When the Ferrari 308 was launched in October of 1975 to replace the Dino 246, it had to meet exceptionally high expectations.

After seeing that even a V6 engine wasn't likely to tarnish the brand's sparkling reputation, Ferrari repealed the bottom-feeder 'Dino' nameplate for the V8-powered 308. With a proper badge on its nose and a triumphant horse dancing on its tail, the 308's rich bloodline was flaunted with pride. This was, of course, only appropriate for a car that looked, sounded, and went like Italy's finest.

The 308 experienced a long production run, and during that time the car was slowly strangled by evolving emissions regulations that stunted its performance. Additionally, weight was added to the car very early in its production when the fiberglass bodies were replaced by steel units. Luckily, though, Ferrari has never been a company to sit back and watch as one of their cars suffers growing pains. The home of the Prancing Horse countered the aging 308's shrinking muscles and growing gut with a midlife crisis to rival the most lavish hair transplants and tummy tucks in the form of the revised Quattrovalvole model.

In 1982, when it was clear that the 308 was growing tired, Ferrari revitalized the car with the introduction of the 308 Quattrovalvole. Translated into English, the Quattrovalvole name means 'four valves.' The new nomenclature referred to a redesigned head featuring four valves per cylinder, a first for Ferrari. The updated mill still displaced 2,962cc, and was mounted transversely behind the cockpit. The compression ratio was increased from 8.8:1 to 9.2:1 (though U.S. versions made due with an 8.6:1 ratio).

The use of Bosh K-Jetronic fuel injection was continued. When first adopted by the 308 in late 1980, the fuel injected engines produced less power than their carbureted predecessors. The power of the old carbureted models was restored with the Quattrovalvole, though. The revised engines produced 240bhp at 7,000 rpm (230bhp at 6,800rpm for U.S. versions), and enabled 0-60 times of 6.1 seconds and top speeds of 155mph.

Two body styles were offered to Quattrovalvole customers, the 308 GTBi and the 308 GTSi. The former was a coupe, while the latter came with a removable roof panel. The 308 design was penned by Pininfarina, and the Quattrovalvole models had several styling features unique to them. New side mirrors and horizontal vents across the width of the 'hood' (front lid) were included, along with a subtly reworked front grille and bumper treatment incorporating driving lights. Beginning in 1984, body panels for the Quattrovalvoles were coated to prevent corrosion.

Ferrari produced the 308 Quattrovalvole until 1985, when the 308 model range was succeeded by the 328. The 308 models in general make exceptional 'starter' Ferraris for enthusiasts who seek to experience the thrills of exotic car ownership for the price of a new Camry. Though Quattrovalvole values are on the upper end of the 308 cost spectrum, they offer an unbeatable pedigree-to-price ratio.

Sources:

'Ferrari 308 Part 4: 308 Quattrovalvole.' QV500.com (2008): n. pag. Web. 6 Jan 2010. http://www.qv500.com/ferrari308p1.php.

Oldham, Scott. 'Long-Term Test: 1984 Ferrari 308 GTSi Quattrovalvole.' Inside Line (2007): n. pag. Web. 6 Jan 2010. http://www.insideline.com/ferrari/308/1984/long-term-test-1984-ferrari-308-gtsi-quattrovalvole.html.

By Evan Acuña

Ferrari 308 GT/M

Ferrari 308 GTS
1984 Ferrari 308 GTS
Original Price: $59,505
Average Auction Sale: $67,001
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308
1983 Ferrari 308
Original Price: $51,935 - $58,550
Average Auction Sale: $59,326
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308i GTS
1982 Ferrari 308i GTS
Original Price: $58,555
Average Auction Sale: $49,947
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308
1981 Ferrari 308
Original Price: $47,440 - $52,645
Average Auction Sale: $49,403
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308 GTS
1979 Ferrari 308 GTS
Original Price: $28,600
Average Auction Sale: $69,689
Chassis Profiles

Total Production: 3,219
For the initial 18 months of the 308 GTB's production, fiberglass was predominately used for the bodies, but later switched to all-metal. The fiberglass bodies were around 125 kg lighter.

The 308 was capable of producing 255 bhp from its 3 liter, V8, carburetor engine. In 1980, a Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system was installed due to new emission regulations. This caused the horsepower to drop to around 215 hp, thus making the 308 GTBi the slowest of the 308 series.

In 1981, Ferrari introduced 4 valve heads for the 3 liter V8's. This 308's now became known as 308 GTB/GTS Quattrovalvole. The engine now produced 240 BHP, and with the extra weight that was imposed due to using all-metal rather than fiberglass, the performance and handling was back to where it was when it began production.

In 1985, Ferrari introduced the 328 GTB/GTS. A vehicle that came equipped with a 3185 cc engine that produced 270 BHP.
By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2010

Ferrari 308 GT/M

Ferrari 308 GT4
1979 Ferrari 308 GT4
Original Price: $23,875
Average Auction Sale: $65,949
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari 308 GT/4
1978 Ferrari 308 GT/4
Original Price: $23,900
Average Auction Sale: $30,072
Chassis Profiles
Ferrari Dino 308 GT4
1977 Ferrari Dino 308 GT4
Original Price: $23,875
Average Auction Sale: $26,000
Chassis Profiles
One of the most recognizable cars in the world, the Ferrari 308 is probably best known for its role as co-star in the hit TV series 'Magnum P.I.'. The 308 was produced for quite some years, spanning ten years from its introduction in 1975 until the final year of production, 1985. The 308 was replaced by the very similar looking 328 in 1986

Ferrari introduced a less inexpensive line of cars called 'Dino' named after Enzo Ferrari's son Dino who died at a young age from muscular dystrophy. Often dubbed the 'baby' Ferrari; this less-expensive model was aimed at less affluent buyers. The Dino was still made by Ferrari with the construction of the Ferrari-designed engine being farmed out to Fiat. To reduce production costs, Fiat shared the use of the engine in their Fiat Dino, a front engined vehicle that didn't look anything like the Ferrari Dino.

In 1974 Dino introduced the Dino 308 GT4, or Gran Tourismo 4-cam, with a 3 liter V8 mid-engine. Unfortunately the small V6 of the earlier Dino wasn't powerful enough for this heaver, 4-passenger car.

So this prompted Ferrari to develop an all-new engine for the GT4. This engine no longer said Dino on it, and this time, the whole engine and car were entirely made by Ferrari, and said Ferrari. A truly groundbreaking model, the 308 GT4 2+2 was an exciting achievement for Ferrari. It was the first production Ferrari that featured the mid-engined V8 layout that would lead the way for the history of the company for succeeding decades. This was also the first production Ferrari that featured Bertone bodywork instead of Pininfarina. This caused some dissatisfaction by Pininfarina who lost out by cross-town rival for the design.

Introduced in 1973, the Ferrari 308 GT4 was a mid-engined V8-powered 2+2 car built by Ferrari. The 308 GT4 was produced until 1980 when it was replaced by the Mondial 8. A total of 2,826 vehicles were produced during its production run. The 308 GT4 was sold with 'Dino' badging until May of 1976 when all badging was replaced with 'Ferrari' badging.

In November of 1973 the Dino 308 GT4 was debuted at the Paris Motor Show. This car featured angular lines that were totally different from its curvy sibling, the Dino 246. The styling was incredibly unique and controversial for its time, and some journalists even compared it to the Bertone-designed Lamborghini Urraco and the Lancia Stratos. In May of 1976 the 308 GT4 received the 'Prancing Horse' badge, replacing the Dino badges on the steering wheel, hood and wheels.

This was the first V8 that Ferrari had ever been put into a road car, and it was a peppy little engine. The Ferrari 308 GT4 handled ‘like a dream car', and was less expensive than ‘true' Ferraris, and was popular as a car for racers who wanted to race a 'budget' Ferrari. It was still not a cheap car, but the biggest problem with this car was the 'wedgy' design by Bertone. Bertone is known best as the company that designed many of Lamborghini's cars, but this wedge shape didn't sell well for Ferrari fans.

The chassis of the 308 GT4 was based on the Dino 246 but it was lengthened for a 100.4 inches wheelbase to make more room for a second row of seats. The Ferrari 308 GT4 measured a total length of 170.1 inches and featured a wheelbase of 100.4 inches. Its overall weight was 2,535 lbs, had a height of 46.5 inches and a width of 70.9 inches. The V8 was mounted transversely and the suspension was fully independent. Producing 230 hp in the American version, and 250 hp in the European version, the 2.0 L V8 engine was integrally joined with the gearbox and had an alloy block and heads with a dual overhead camshaft. The induction system utilized 4 Weber 40 DCNF carbs.

Unfortunately the Ferrari 308 GT4 was a dramatic sales failure for the company. Many fans didn't like that ‘Ferrari' wasn't written on the back of the car, and it was a little too strange looking. Slowly becoming true collector items, the Ferrari 308 GT4 featured a very edgy design that over the years has aged well. Halfway through 1975, dealers were told by Ferrari to add Ferrari badges to the GT4 inventory to boost sales.

By Jessica DonaldsonThe Pininfarina designed Ferrari 308 was debut in 1975 and was immediately a success. The vehicles performance, handling, and styling were phenomenal.

For the initial 18 months of the 308 GTB's production, fiberglass was predominately used for the bodies, but later switched to all-metal. The fiberglass bodies were around 125 kg lighter.

The 308 was capable of producing 255 bhp from its 3 liter, V8, carburetor engine. In 1980, a Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system was installed due to new emission regulations. This caused the horsepower to drop to around 215 hp, thus making the 308 GTBi the slowest of the 308 series.

In 1981, Ferrari introduced 4 valve heads for the 3 liter V8's. This 308's now became known as 308 GTB/GTS Quattrovalvole. The engine now produced 240 BHP, and with the extra weight that was imposed due to using all-metal rather than fiberglass, the performance and handling was back to where it was when it began production.

In 1985, Ferrari introduced the 328 GTB/GTS. A vehicle that came equipped with a 3185 cc engine that produced 270 BHP.
By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2009
Model Production *
* Please note, dates are approximate

Related Articles and History

308 GT/M History

The 308 was Ferrari's first two-seat V8 road car. Made available to the public in 1975, it was the long awaited successor to the incomparable Dino 246 GT. The 308 series was a new beginning for the company as the premier builder of exotic sports cars for road use. As such, the 308 was designed to epitomize the sports car in its era. It did so admirably, and remains perhaps the most influential enthusiast car in history. The 308 is the car against which every subsequent sports car has been measured, upon which every Ferrari V8 sports and racing car has been based, and the car that brought Ferrari from the pinnacle of elite car-culture recognition into the minds of the general public. 25 years later, the shape and sound of the 308 is still 'Ferrari' in the minds of many people.

Design

The Ferrari 308 GTS provided Pininfarina with an opportunity to flex its design and styling muscle. The company responded by redefining the public's collective impression of what a Ferrari, and indeed what a sportscar, should look like. The task given Pininfarina was the creation of a two-seat mid-engined V8, and few can have expected the Turin designer to respond with such a tour de force.

The 308's shape bears a passing resemblance to Pininfarina's Dino 246 GT. Where the older car was the ultimate expression of curvaceous 1960's styling, the 308 hinted far more at the future. From its sharp nose incorporating a slim bumper and a deep air dam, to its retractable headlights and row of black louvres that vent air from the radiator, the line flows up the windshield and out around the flanks to reunite

with itself at the buttress C-pillars, ending in a very subtle rear lip spoiler. The design is so beautiful and effective that it has been a basis for exterior styling of every subsequent V8 Ferrari and an object of study for design students the world over.

GTS models had louvered panels over the whole of their rear quarter windows. Increased venting front and rear served to improve cooling with each evolution of the engine. By and large, however, the design of the 308 was so iconic and effective that it was virtually unchanged throughout its decade of production.

Drivetrain

The heart of the 308 series was its three litre V8 engine. The 2926cc Ferrari V8 was something of a departure for the company, which had mostly relied on V12s. With the V8, Ferrari could offer much of the power of their legendary V12s while improving fuel economy and saving space. By placing the engine and transmission transversely Ferrari was able to reduce the length of their new sports cars and concentrate the mass within the wheelbase, a lesson of racing.

The transmission in the 308 was a five speed with reverse all synchromesh unit. Mounted transversely like the engine, the transmission received power through an unassisted single plate clutch. The gears sent power to the rear wheels through a limited slip differential and solid driveshafts with constant velocity joints.

Source - Ferrari
Ferrari Models


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