1932 Packard Model 900 Light Eight

History

The Packard Motor Company relied on making luxurious cars that were highly refined, fitted with luxurious coachwork, and powered by proven engineering. This belief had placed them among the elite in the auto industry during the early 1900s. As the world entered the Great Depression, the Packard Company was one of the few that managed to survive. In fact, they outsold all of their competitors combined. They had entered the Depression in excellent financial health and they emerged with strong financial footing. But the post depression era had them worried, as the number of potential buyers had dwindled as fortunes were lost. Production had dropped nearly half each year when compared with the previous, from 1929 to 1933. In response to the decline, Packard continued to make improvements each year.

In 1932, Packard introduced their Ninth Series. It featured many improvements which helped segregate it from other automakers in the industry. Improvements included a revised steering geometry which made steering smooth and easy. Braking was equally as easy thanks to the new driver adjustable power assisted braking system. The shifting action and clutch were improved making driving a very enjoyable activity. The drivers workload was eased even further with the spark advance and automatic choke.

By making these changes they attracted a growing segment of buyers and drivers - woman.

The 1933 Packard's were called the Tenth Series cars as the company still refused to adopt the convention of the model year system which called for new cars to be introduced in September or October to coincide with the auto show schedules. The following year, the reluctantly joined with other manufacturers which resulted in a shorted run for the tenth series, lasting just seven months. The new Packard model line was introduced in the fall. Because of the seven month production lifespan of the Tenth Series, very few were produced making them very rare in modern times.

The Tenth Series were given a new X-braced frames, dual coil ignition, and downdraft carburetors. The styling was updated with skirted fenders and a 'V'-shaped radiator shell. The interior featured upgraded trim and a new aircraft inspired dash.

Packard continued to offer three chassis, the Eight, Super Eight, and the Twelve. The Super Eight and Twelve both rested on a wheelbase that measured 142-inches and had a hood that was nearly six-inches longer than the Eight. The fenders were longer as well.

The bodies on the Twelve's and Super Eight were interchangeable, with the Super Eight featuring an eight-cylinder engine while the Twelve featured a twelve cylinder engine. During this time, Packard also produced the Eight, which had a smaller wheelbase size and the eight-cylinder engine. The Super Eight and Twelve differed by interior appointments and engine size. The bodies were constructed of wood and steel.

In 1936 Packard was producing their Fourteenth Series as the number thirteen had been skipped. It is believed that thirteen was not used due to superstitious reasons. The Fourteenth Series was the last year for Bijur lubrication, ride control, a semi-elliptic suspension, mechanical brakes, heavy vibration dampening bumpers and the 384.4 cubic inch straight eight engine. It was also the last year for the option of wire or wood wheels.

In 1936 the fourteenth series received a new radiator which was installed at a five-degree angle. The Super 8 had a new sloped grille with chrome vertical bars which gave the vehicle a unique look and served as thermostatically controlled shutters which opened or closed based on engine heat. The headlight trim, fender styling, and hood vents saw minor changes. A new Delco-Remy ignition system was the new updates for 1936 under the bonnet.

For 1936 there were a total of 1,492 Super Eights constructed.


By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008

1932 Vehicle Profiles

1932 Packard Model 900 Light Eight vehicle information

Convertible Coupe

The 1932 Packard 900 Light Eight Coupe-Roadster was produced for only one year, 1932. Its selling price ranged from $1,795 to $1,940. The engine was a L-head in-line 8, iron block, aluminum crankcase, rated at 319 cubic-inches, generating 110 horse....[continue reading]

1932 Packard Model 900 Light Eight vehicle information

Convertible Coupe

James Ward Packard built his first automobile at Warren, Ohio in 1899. Detroiter Henry Joy became enthusiastically involved and moved the company there. His successor, Alvan Macauley, teamed with engineer Jesse Vincent to make Packard one of the fi....[continue reading]

1932 Packard Model 900 Light Eight vehicle information

Sedan

'In presenting its Light Eight, Packard now adds a new fine car at a new low price to the distinguished line of famous Packard Eights. Lighter in weight through engineering and manufacturing advances, this car is nevertheless ample in power, roomy i....[continue reading]

1932 Packard Model 900 Light Eight vehicle information

Convertible Coupe

Chassis Num: 191207

Throughout the 1910s and 1920s, Packards were among the elite in luxury automobiles. The company, along with Pierce-Arrow and Peerless, was one of the 'Three Ps' of American motorcar royalty. With the stock market crash in 1929 the auto industry was ....[continue reading]

Convertible Coupe
 
Convertible Coupe
 
Sedan
 
Convertible Coupe
Chassis #: 191207 


Concepts by Packard



Recent Vehicle Additions

Performance and Specification Comparison

Price Comparison

$2-$1,760
1932 Model 900 Light Eight
$1,895-$8,125
1932 Packard Model 900 Light Eight Price Range: $1,760 - $1,895

Model Year Production

#1#2#3Packard
1937Ford (942,005)Chevrolet (815,375)Plymouth (566,128)122,593
1936Ford (930,778)Chevrolet (918,278)Plymouth (520,025)
1935Ford (820,253)Chevrolet (548,215)Plymouth (350,884)788
1934Ford (563,921)Chevrolet (551,191)Plymouth (321,171)
1933Chevrolet (486,261)Ford (334,969)Plymouth (298,557)4,800
1932Chevrolet (313,404)Ford (210,824)Plymouth (186,106)4,844
1931Chevrolet (619,554)Ford (615,455)Buick (138,965)
1930Ford (1,140,710)Chevrolet (640,980)Buick (181,743)
1929Ford (1,507,132)Chevrolet (1,328,605)Buick (196,104)
1928Chevrolet (1,193,212)Ford (607,592)Willys Knight (231,360)
1927Chevrolet (1,001,820)Ford (367,213)Buick (255,160)

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