1976 Jaguar XJ12

1976 Jaguar XJ12 1976 Jaguar XJ12 1976 Jaguar XJ12
Coupe
The 2-door pillar-less coupe is based on the short wheelbase Two XJ6. Of the 92,376 Series Two Jaguars produced during the period, 1973 thru 1978, only 1,873 V12 Coupes were built. Total production of the RHD V12 Coupes was 604. Today, fewer than 100 are believed to exist.

The car has a V12 5.4-liter engine generating 285 horsepower. Top speed was 147 MPH with zero-to-sixty times of 7.6 seconds.

The Series Two models were introduced at the 1973 Frankfurt Motor Show alongside another variant on the XJ theme, a two-door coupe. This model which carried the suffix C (for coupe), was especially significant in that it represented Sir William Lyon's last project before his retirement from active design in 1972.

The XJC used the short wheelbase floorpan with larger front doors and a slightly different roofline, but was otherwise substantially the same as the four-door saloons. However, there were considerable problems with sealing and raising and lowering the small rear windows, so the coupes did not go into production until early 1975. Lyons had insisted that the front and rear windows meet in a pillarless construction, which was very elegant, but posed many problems for the development engineers who had to keep down the wind noise on these exceptionally fast cars. When they were eventually introduced, the XJC option became available throughout the range, except for the Vanden Plas Daimler.

Unfortunately, the coupes remained in relatively restricted production. By the time they were introduced, the short wheelbase floorpan had been discontinued because of the greater demand for the long wheelbase XJ. Of the 92,376 Series Two Jaguars produced during the period, 1973 through 1978, only 1873 V12 Coupes were built. Total production of RHD Jaguar V12 Coupes was 604. Today, fewer than 100 are believed to remain.

This particular car was first registered in the UK on December 21, 1976. Its owner was the Honorable H. V. Smith, Southern Manor, Bicester, Oxon. Major R. B. French, Somerset, purchased the car in September of 1983. It was used by him until the Fall of 1987, when full restoration was begun. Restoration was completed by his son, Peter French, and the car was put on the road again in June of 1995.

The car was purchased by the current owner in July of 1998 and was shipped from Southampton, UK to the United States that same month.

1976 Jaguar XJ12 1976 Jaguar XJ12 1976 Jaguar XJ12
Sedan
Jaguar has long enjoyed a storied heritage of dashing styling and high performance. Jaguar dates to 1922 when two motorcycle enthusiasts, Sir William Lyons and William Walmsley, founded the Swallow Sidecar Company. After World War II, they developed a reputation for dashing styling and high performance as a steady stream of sexy sports cars and purpose-built race cars rolled out of their British factory. In the early 1950s they added a series of elegant luxury saloons; the XJ joined this line in 1968 and four years later the XJ12 was introduced, with a 5.3-liter V12. It was touted as the fastest full four-seater available in the world with a top speed near 140 mph.

Although the plan had always been to eventually squeeze a V12 into the XJ engine bay, the actual installation proved a tight fit and quite an engineering challenge. A Series II redesign debuted in 1973 and from then on the two-door coupe kept the shorter wheelbase and the 4-door, or long-wheelbase model, got an extra four inches of cabin length. 1976 also saw the addition of electronic fuel injection in North American XJs. Sales brochures in 1976 proudly boasted that 'real wood, real leather and deep silence are standard equipment' on all XJ12's.

This car was bought online, sight unseen, in 2012. The current owner was attracted to its elegant design and beautiful Imperial Maroon paint. It came with plenty of documentation and virtually no rust; very rare given its Michigan heritage.

The Jaguar XJ series began in 1968 and has continued in various forms and Series into modern times. The first 'Mark' was introduced in 1968 and continued until 1992. During this time there were three series, Series 1, Series 2, and Series 3. In 1986 Jaguar introduced the Mark II which continued until 2002. During this time there were the XJ40, XJ81, X300, X305 and X308. The Mark III was introduced in 2003.

Sir John William hailed the JX series as 'the finest Jaguar ever.' The 'XJ' designation had been used during the vehicles development as its codename. When the vehicle was introduced, the codename persisted. When introduced it was powered by a six-cylinder engine that came in either 2.8- or 4.2-liter displacement. In 1972 a 5.3-liter V12 unit was introduced with a total of 3,235 examples being produced its introductory year. From 1968 through 1973, Jaguar produced 82,126 examples of the XJ Series I.

The Jaguar XJ Series II, commonly known as the Series II, was introduced in 1973. It brought mild aesthetic improvements over the prior years. One of the more visual indications of a Series II from a Series I was the smaller front grille. A 3.4-liter engine became available in 1975. In total, 91,227 examples of the Series II were produced with 14,226 being outfitted with the 12-cylinder engine. 8378 examples were of the two-door XJ Coupes which were produced from 1975 through 1978.

The Series II vehicles had a reputation for pool build quality which was partly due to outsourced components. The XJC versions were plagued with loud wind noise and water leakage.

A limited number of XJC pillar-less hardtop coupes were produced from 1975 through 1978. These are commonly known as the XJC. Their chassis's were constructed on the short-wheelbase version of the XJ. They came equipped with either the six or twelve cylinder engine. Extensive amount of labor was required in order to modify the saloon body to create the XJC. The labor intensive process and high sticker price was part of the reason only 8378 examples were produced.

In 1979 Jaguar unveiled the Series 3 which remained in production until 1992. The famous design studio, Pininfarina, had been tasked with incorporating design enhancements for the long-wheelbase version. The results were stunning.

The Series III were powered by six- and 12-cylinder engines. In six-cylinder form, the owner could select either the 3.4-liter or 4.2-liter unit. The V12 unit had 5.3-liters in displacement size. The larger six-cylinder engine and the 12-cylinder unit both utilized Bosch fuel injection. The smaller six used carburetors and now offered for sale in the US.

In total, there were 132,952 examples of the Series III produced. A small percentage of those, 10,500, were equipped with the 12-cylinder engine. In 1987 Jaguar ceased production of the Series III XJ with the six-cylinder engines. The Series III with the 12-cylinder power-plant continued until 1992.

The Series III brought with it cruise control and a sunroof as optional equipment. The Vanden Plas option was introduced in 1982 and intended for the US market. This designation indicated the top-of-the-line offering for the Jaguar XJ which included the twelve-cylinder engine and many luxury items as standard equipment.

The Project XJ40 had been in development by British Leyland (Jaguar) since the 1970's. Designs by Pininfarina were submitted but ultimately, Jaguar decided to stick with its internal design studio for their newest creation. There were delays with the project which delayed its introduction. These delay's, which included the unforeseen fuel crisis, meant the Jaguar Mark II XJ40 was unveiled to European markets until 1986. Since its design had been started in the 1970's, it brought with it many controversial designs from that era. The square headlights were one of these antiquated features.

Jaguar offered the XJ40 with only six-cylinder units when first introduced. The 12-cylinder unit's were not ready, thus the continuation of the Series III with the V12 until 1992. In 1989 Ford took over Jaguar. Work began on redesigning the engine bay to accommodate the V12. It would take a few more years of development until the V12 was ready.

In 1993 a twelve-cylinder version of the Mark II was ready for sale. By now, the vehicles were known as XJ81. Production would continue until 1994 of these 6.0-liter four-door saloons. Power was sent to the rear wheels through a GM 4L80E four-speed automatic gearbox with overdrive on the fourth gear.

In 1995 the XJ6, code-named X300 Series, was introduced which used styling cues from the popular Series III cars. There were now four individual headlights, reminiscent of the Series III era. The hood was also very similar to the S3. The work of the newly designs and updated X300 Series cars was done by Geoff Lawson, the head designer for Jaguar. Included in this series was the XJ6, Vanden Plas, XJR, and Daimler. Power was from a 4-liter six-cylinder unit or from the 6-liter 12-cylinder unit. The XJR version featured a supercharger on the six-cylinder unit. This was a radical departure from Jaguar's history, as a supercharger had never been used by the Jaguar Company. Turbochargers were almost as rare in the company's long and prestigious history. The XJ220 is one of the few Jaguars, up to this point, to have been outfitted with a turbocharger.

Though the exterior of the car had received attention, the interior received very few updates.

Production of the XJ6 continued into 1997.

The XJ12 and Daimler Double Six as introduced in 1995 and produced until 1996. It was known under the codename X305. Production of the XJ12 was low with only 3400 examples produced. Though they shared many design features as the X300 Series, there was much to distinguish the two series. V12 badges were placed on each side of the vehicles pillar.

The X308 was introduced in 1997 and continued until 2002. Included in this series was the XJ7, JXR, Daimler, and Vanden Plas. The X308 Series brought about an all-new dashboard. The most significant improvement was the use of eight-cylinder engines. They were offered in 3.2-liter, and 4.0-liter displacement sizes. The XJR included a five-speed automatic transmission and a supercharger on the 4.0-liter unit which greatly improvement the vehicles performance. The base 4.0-liter produced 290 horsepower while the supercharger version increased output to 370.

In 2002, Jaguar introduced the XJR 100 which was a limited 500 special edition versions of the XJR. They were all painted in black with matching black leather interior. Alloy sport wheels, red stitching in the interior, and maple trim were used exclusively on the XJR 100.

The Mark III was introduced in 2002 and brought about an all-new aluminum lightweight body. These were codenamed the X350. Included in this series was the XJ6, XJ8, XJR, Vanden Plas, Super V8, and Daimler Super Eight. Visually, the vehicle had changed little. The biggest improvements were under the hood and throughout the other mechanical components. The chassis and body were constructed mostly from aluminum with small amounts of steel.

The Super V8 made its debut in 2004. This was a long-wheelbase version of the XJ and is considered the most luxurious and powerful of the series. As such, it is also the most expensive. Under the hood was a 4.2-liter supercharger V8 that produced 400 horsepower. A limited edition, called the Super V8 Portfolio, was introduced at the 2005 New York Auto Show as a 2006 model. It carried a base price of $115,999. Improvements were more power and luxury enhancements. There were only limited colors offered, either Black Cherry or Winter Gold. Zero-to-sixty took just five seconds.

The Mark III, aka X350, was powered by a 4.2-liter V8 that came in natural aspiration or supercharger. The base engine produced 300 horsepower while the supercharger version raised that figure to 400.


By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2006

Concepts by Jaguar

Jaguar Monthly Sales Volume

December 2019
3,311
October 2019
2,350
September 2019
2,002
May 2019
2,021
March 2019
3,679
January 2019
3,078
Additional Sales Volume Data


Recent Vehicle Additions

Performance and Specification Comparison

Price Comparison

$2,194-$16,120
1976 XJ12
$16,825-$52,000
1976 Jaguar XJ12 Price Range: $16,120 - $16,825

$14,100 - $14,850

Model Year Production

#1#2#3Jaguar
1981Chevrolet (1,673,093)Renault (1,295,713)Toyota (1,068,321)4,688
1980Chevrolet (2,288,745)Renault (1,492,339)Ford (1,162,275)2,951
1979Chevrolet (2,284,749)Ford (1,835,937)Renault (1,405,330)3,551
1978Chevrolet (2,375,436)Ford (1,923,655)Renault (1,240,941)4,688
1977Chevrolet (2,543,153)Toyota (1,884,260)Ford (1,840,427)4,349
1976Chevrolet (2,103,862)Toyota (1,884,260)Ford (1,861,537)7,382
1975Chevrolet (1,755,773)Toyota (1,714,836)Ford (1,569,608)6,799
1974Chevrolet (2,333,839)Ford (2,179,791)Renault (1,355,799)5,299
1973Chevrolet (2,579,509)Ford (2,349,815)Fiat (1,390,251)6,767
1972Chevrolet (2,420,564)Ford (2,246,563)Fiat (1,368,216)5,143
1971Ford (2,054,351)Chevrolet (1,830,319)Volkswagen (1,128,784)5,614

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