1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Competition Speciale

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Competition Speciale
Coupe
Coachwork: Allegretti
Chassis #: 09813
Engine #: 100 148
Sold for $1,155,000 at 2007 Gooding & Company.
In normal guise, the Ferrari 275 GTB was a road-going car, but what is often the case with the prancing horse marque, customers wanted to take it racing. To quench their desire, Ferrari developed the 275 GTB/C with alloy bodywork and a six-carburetor engine. The most success example was chassis number 06885 that Scuderia Ferrari, Ecurie Francorchamps and NART raced in 1965. Among its successes was a first in class in the 1965 24 Hours of LeMans, piloted by Willy Mairesse and 'Beurlys' (Jean Blaton). It was a very unique example that had a GTO styled front-end, three air vent slots in the fenders behind the rear wheels, and large driving lights.

The 275 GTB/4 was introduced in 1966. Again, it was not intended for competition. The main differences between the 275 GTB and the 275 GTB/4 was dual overhead camshaft cylinder heads and an increase in horsepower and torque.

Ferrari did not make a competition version of the 275 GTB/4, though around 17 of the 280 GTB/4's constructed were clothed in aluminum by Scaglietti.

This Ferrari 275 GTB/4 is chassis number 09813. It was found in early January of 1987 in pieces by Greg Garrison. All that remained were the engine, chassis, tires and four wheels. The car had been in an accident, so the chassis was not in perfect condition. Garrison sent the parts to Italy where a new chassis to the original plans was created by Vaccari, the Ferrari chassis builder. Brandoli in Maranello was tasked with building the body, but it was Carrozzeria Mario Allegretti in Modena who would end up creating the lightweight aluminum coachwork it now wears. The engine, transmission and rear assembly, brakes, and other mechanical components were restored at Sport Auto by Johnny Dena and Albo.

The coachwork is reminiscent of the LeMans class winning 275 GTB/C. It has the GTO-style nose, oval grille, covered driving lights, and an opening at the front of the hood bulge. The side windows are fixed, but have sliding panels to allow ventilation and access. In the rear are three grill vents which allow air to freely flow from the rear wheel wells. There is an exterior fuel filler cap which can be found in the right roof sail panel.

The exterior is deep red and the interior is tan and black leather. It is equipped with a roll bar for additional support and safety.

In 2007 the car was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction held in Pebble Beach, California where it was estimated to sell for $700,000 - $850,000. It was offered without reserve. Those estimates proved too low, as bidding soon excelled over the magic million dollar mark. As the gavel fell for the third and final time, the lot had been sold for $1,155,000 including buyer's premium.


By Daniel Vaughan | May 2008
1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Competition Speciale
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Chassis #: 10311
There were nearly 800 examples of the 275 Berlinetta produced from 1964 through 1968. A two-cam version of the 275 was introduced two years later. A four-cam version soon followed. Though the Ferrari factory never produced a competition 275 GTB/4, there was a run of alloy body versions manufactured to special order. These lightweight aluminum, alloy bodies weighed around 260 pounds less than their steel counterparts. For the two-cam Berlinettas, around 27 alloy bodies were constructed with two-gauges of aluminum used. Around 17-19 of the alloy-bodied cars were made with the four-cam engine.

This 1967 Ferrari 275GTB/4 Alloy Berlinetta is chassis number 10311 and wears coachwork by Scaglietti. It first race was at the 1968 Watkins Glen Six Hour race where it was run under the NART (North American Racing Team) banner. The drivers were Bob Grossman and Ronnie Bucknum. When the checkered flag fell, they were seated in ninth position after traveling 240 laps. To prepare it for the race, the bumpers had been removed, an outside exhaust system was installed, a roll bar was inserted, an external gas filler was built to feed the twin fuel tanks, twin Bendix electric fuel pumps and 15' x 7' Borrani wire racing wheels were fitted. Some tuning was done to the engine.

The car was brought to Daytona but it did not have a driver. There were a few drivers available, such as a young Sam Posey and Ricardo Rodriguez. Rodriguez was a cattle rancher from South American who had a passion for racing. Posey had never raced in a Ferrar. During the race, the gearbox failed. There was no spare, so the crew attempted to rebuilt it in the pits. The unit was fixed and the car returned to racing. It finished 2nd in class and 23rd overall. This was an impressive accomplishment, especially after loosing 3 hours in the pits.

By the early 1970s the car was in Houston. At this point in history it wore a metallic brown paint scheme and was owned by Dr. Ron Finger, a plastic surgeon, who would go on to own many interesting Ferraris. In 1972, the car was purchased by a young doctor Frenger for $8,000. During the next two years, the car was painted white, similar to its original ivory color. A $1,200 valve job was performed on the engine.

Skip Berg became the cars next caretaker in 1984. While in his care, the car was given a restoration. Some time prior in its life, the car had been in an accident and the repair job was done poorly. The cars restoration was featured in Cavallino magazine in issue number 40, August of 1987.

In 2008, the car was offered for sale at the 'Quail Lodge, A Sale of Exceptional Motorcars and Automobilia' presented by Bonhams Auction. It would leave the auction unsold.


By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2008
During the late sixties, Ferraris road-oriented berlinettas split in terms of design from their race cars. After the 250 short wheelbase berlinetta, the dual purpose road / race Ferrari seemed gone. This new distinction motivated Ferrari to manufacture more civil road cars having impressive specification. The first example of this new trend was the 275 GTB.

As unveiled at the 1964 Paris Motor Show, the 275 sported race-inspired engineering. Features such as all-independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, a five speed transaxle and an optional alloy body distinguished the 275 from the much larger and heavier 330 GTC built beside it.

Being light, powerful and strikingly beautiful, the 275 was a very successful car for Ferrari. It sold well, with around 1000 examples made, and, as an afterthought, scored victories in endurance racing after the 250 LM was denied homologation.

In 1966 the 275 GTB was re-introduced with a four-cam version of the V12. Six Webber carburetors aided in delivering around 300 horsepower. To cope with the new power, the GTB/4 was given wider tires and a ZF limited-slip differential.

Related Reading : Ferrari 275 History

During the late sixties, Ferraris road-oriented berlinettas split in terms of design from their race cars. After the 250 short wheelbase berlinetta, the dual purpose road race Ferrari seemed gone. This new distinction motivated Ferrari to manufacture more civil road cars having impressive specification. The first example of this new trend was the 275 GTB. The 275 GTBGTS was debuted in October....
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