1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500

The Lamborghini Countach LP5000 S, also referred to as the LP500 S, was produced from 1982 through 1985 with 323 examples produced. The production version of the Bertone styled car was unveiled at the 1982 Geneva Motorshow. The first Countach prototype was shown at the 1971 Geneva Motorshow and had a mid-engine configuration powered by a twelve-cylinder engine. It had a longitudinally mounted five-liter V12 engine which gave the Countach its 'LP500' designation.

The production version, dubbed the LP400, would not appear for two years. When introduced, it had several improvements such as a tubular frame in place of the monocoque chassis. Also the gearbox was placed in front of the engine which imporoved the vehicles balance. The power produced by the four-liter V12 engine, the same found in the Miura, was sent to the rear wheels through a driveshaft which had its own tunnel in the engine's sump.

The Countach production would continue for over nearly 20 years. During that time, five different evolutions were created, each offering an increase in horsepower.

In 1982, a five-liter version of the engine was offered (though the engine displacement size was actually 4.7 liters). There were 323 examples of the five-liter Countach LP5000S produced between 1982 and 1985.

The final version of the Countach was the Quattrovalvole which sported four valve heads and 455 bhp horsepower in European trim. The US versions, which complied with emissions standards, produced 375 hp.


By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2008
1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500 Coupe
Designer: Bertone
Even during an era of tightening government control and rising emission regulations, auto manufacturers continued to explore and develop new technologies. The industry was being forced to abandon carburetors for another environmentally friendly means of making power.

This Lamborghini is a 1982 model and the Geneva show car. It is the first 5 litre Countach to be imported to the United States. Lamborghini feared its vehicles would not comply with US regulations which would result in a loss of the lucrative US market. As a result, they commissioned this car, the prototype for fuel-injection, to meet regulations while retaining the tried-and-true Countach performance. After passing the requirements and proving the technology, the car was sent back to the factory and displayed on the show circuit as the prototype for the 5000s Countach model. A short time later, all Lamborghini's were fitted with fuel-injection systems.

The Lamborghini Countach Fuel-Injected Prototype remains in original condition. The exterior paint is in excellent condition, considering its age and the distinct blue leather interior is also in fine condition. The car has low mileage - still under 10,000 - and has lived a rather stationary and well maintained life.


By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2012
1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500 Coupe
Designer: Bertone
Chassis #: ZA9C00500CLA12507
Sold for $198,000 at 2013 RM Auctions - Monterey.
Lamborghini stunned the automotive community with their Miura at the 1965 Geneva Motor Show with its mid-mounted transverse V-12. The design was courtesy of Marcello Gandini and he introduced another groundbreaking design in 1971 - the LP 400 Countach. It predicated the angular style typical of the 1980s, ten years in advance. Power was from a four-liter V12 offering 375 horsepower.

The Lamborghini Countach featured upward-hinging 'scissor doors', fender flares, wide tires, and safety bumpers for the American market. A total of 110 early 'periscopo' models were built between 1974 and 1977. Seventy-seven additional examples of the LP 400 were produced with more conventional mirrors. The 400S was introduced in 1978, with fender flares and an optional rear wing.

In 1982, the engine was enlarged to almost five liters, thus birthing the LP 400S, also known sa the 5000S. Stiffer U.S. emission regulations meant that carbureted grey market imports could no longer pass EPA standards.

This example is the 1982 Geneva Motor Show car. It was brought to the United States and served as the development car for the United States version, utilizing a Bosch fuel injection unit to control emissions. When complete, the car passed the EPA tests and it was later sent back to Italy to serve as the U.S. production prototype.

The car is finished in its salon-car livery of silver with a blue leather interior. The car has never been restored and is very original. The DOT bumpers that were fitted by the factory in 1984 have since been removed, and though it was once equipped with fuel injection, it has more recently been retrofitted with the original-specification Weber carburetors.

The engine has been completely rebuilt along with the transaxle. It is a low mileage example with fewer than 18,000 kilometers.


By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2014
The Countach was the predecessor to the very successful Miura. The body was designed by Marcello Gandini at Bertone, and given a mid-engine layout in two-door coupe configuration. It featured an attractive and curvaceous body with elegant lines and fitted with modern mechanical components and technology. The engine was mounted longitudinally and replaced the transverse layout of its predecessor. The transmission was now fitted in front of the engine offering excellent weight distribution. Power was sent to the rear wheels through a driveshaft, which ran in its own tunnel in the engine's sump. Top speed was achieved at nearly 200 mph with zero-to-sixty taking under six-seconds.

The Countach was first shown to the public at the 1971 Geneva Motorshow. It was dubbed the Countach LP500, for its five-liter powerplant. It was finished in an eye-catching bright sunflower yellow and had small air intake ducts. The production version, though similar in design, was a vast departure from the prototype version. The car customers received did not have the five-liter engine or the monocoque chassis. Instead, a four-liter derivative engine was mounted inside a tubular frame. Though the engine was smaller in displacement size, it was much more reliable and durable. The 5-liter unit had failed initial testing and was destroyed during a high speed test session. Part of the issue was the cars poor ability to keep the engine cool, which eventually resulted in larger air ducts.

The prototype car was destroyed in a European crash test demonstration. A sad end to a unique vehicle that could only be described as 'priceless' in the modern era.

The Countach had elegant lines that ran from the front to the rear in classic Bertone style. The only things disrupting those lines were the vehicles cooling vents, which were necessary to provide air to the engine. The doors opened in scissor-like fashion and added to the ambiance and exotic nature of the vehicle.

Two years after the Geneva Motorshow debut, the production version was ready for the customers. The cars were called the 'Countach LP400', again, in reference to the vehicles engine displacement size. The car remained in production for two decades; during that time five different versions and iterations of the Countach were offered. By 1982, a suitable five-liter engine had been created and could be found in the vehicles engine bay; three years later the engine evolved again, being given four-valve heads and increasing horsepower to 455 for the European versions.

The first individual to receive a Countach was an Australian who took procession in 1974. D. Milne was a member of the Australian Defense Force Transport Corps.

This car, along with most of the other cars built by Lamborghini had one purpose: To beat Ferrari. Mr. Ferruccio Lamborghini, a tractor manufacturer, had an argument with Enzo Ferrari. He had bought a Ferrari and had a complaint with the car. When he approached Enzo Ferrari with his comments, Enzo replied that the problem was with the driver and not with the car. He also remarked that Ferruccio was just a tractor maker and did not understand real engineering. The result was a super car dynasty.

The first series of Countach's were known as the LP400 followed by the LP400S in 1978. The engine was further increased in 1982 to 4.8 liters and the model designation changed to LP500s. The LP500S was Lamborghini's response to Ferrari's 'Boxer' car, the 365 GT4. It was called 'Boxer' because it used a horizontally opposed engine which resembled a boxer boxing. Ferrari's response to the LP500S was the Testarossa. Once again, Lamborghini answered by creating the Quattrovalvole that produced 455 horsepower.

Electric fans and large ducts located behind the door helped with keeping the mid-engine V-12 cool. By placing the engine in the middle, better handling was achieved through better weight distribution. The body was made entirely of alloy except for the fiberglass doors.

Trunk space was limited. Both the front and the rear had minimal compartments for storage.

A rear spoiler was optional and provided extra down force and stability. It also looked good as well.

In 1991, after twenty years of production, the Countach was laid to rest to make room for the new Diablo. There were 157 examples of the LP400 produced; 237 of the LP400S. 321 of the LP500S were created and 676 examples of the LP500S QV. The 25th Anniversary edition had some of the highest production figures of all the Countach's, second to the LP500S QV, with 650 examples being production.


By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2014

Concepts by Lamborghini



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