1966 Shelby Mustang GT350

1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM 6S051
• First of 55 cars factory supercharged

• First and only car with a factory installed 'S' stripe

• First car not Wimbledon White with Blue stripes

• First car produced specifically for the buyer: Carroll Shelby's banker who drag-raced it in the 1960's.

The sales figures following the launch of the Ford Mustang in April of 1964 were nothing short of a phenomenon. Eighteen months into production, sales would reach nearly one million. Instead of waiting for the 'bubble to burst,' Lee Iacocca worked on the 'win on Sunday, sell on Monday' formula. Although a sales success, the early Mustangs were not the epitome of Total Performance, especially since this pony car was based on Fords old economy car the Falcon. By this point in history, Carroll Shelby was known, trusted, and respected by Ford, thanks to his efforts engineering the successful Cobra projects. In December 1964, the Sports Car Championship of America accepted the GT-350 into B-Production Racing. The Shelby GT-350 was unveiled by Shelby on January 27th of 1965 and during its racing career, the GT350 delivered three SCCA B-Production Championships in 1965-1967 for Ford.

January 1965 was a busy month for Shelby America as Ford turned the GT-40 project over to him and two months later the company moved to the Los Angeles Airport facility for continued GT-350 production. The GT-350 began life as a White Mustang 2+2 delivered initially to Carroll Shelbys shop in Venice California from Fords San Jose California Plant. They were powered by High-Performance 289 cubic-inch V8 engines backed by a four-speed manual gearbox.

Most of Shelby's contributions were aimed at the chassis and handling of the Mustang, transforming it into a highly competitive sports car. The concept was a performance sports car from the start and not a conventional muscle car. Shelby modifications to the Hi-Po 289 V8 included a special high riser aluminum manifold, center pivot float Holley four-barrel carburetor, finned Cobra aluminum valve covers, extra capacity finned and baffled aluminum oil pan, and specially designed hand-built tubular tuned exhaust system featuring straight through glass-packed mufflers. These changes brought the standard 271 horsepower to 306 bhp.

Additional mechanical improvements included fully synchronized Borg Warner special Sebring close ratio four-speed manual transmission with lightweight all-alloy case, nine-inch Detroit 'no-spin' differentials, computer designed competition suspension geometry, Koni adjustable shock absorbers, one inch diameter front anti-roll bar, fully stabilized, torque controlled rear axle equipped with No-Spin limited slip differential, Kelsey-Hayes front disc brakes with ventilated disc and special full competition pads, wide drum rear brakes with metallic linings, and trunk-mounted battery for optimum weight distribution.

Exterior changes included the light weight fiberglass hood with integrally-designed functional air scoop, 350 competition side stripes, a clean looking grille, and a tricolored running horse located on the driver's side of the grille.

Interior changes included all black interior with bucket-type seats, Shelby approved competition quick release seatbelts, special instrument cluster with tachometer and oil pressure gauge in addition to speedometer, fuel gauge and water temperature gauge, two-speed electric windshield wipers and washers, wood-rim racing-style steering wheel, 191 quick-ratio steering spare wheel cover, and heater.

All Shelbys in 1965 were painted in Wimbledon White with a blue GT350 side stripe located below the door. The total price for these improvements was a reasonable $4,547. The street GT350 sales were strong, but they were essentially a thinly disguised race car. Buyers complained about the noise, rattles and harshness. This led to the 1965 GT350 becoming more user-friendly due to a host of mechanical revisions that softened the edges and made the cars more tractable.

To ensure that Shelby American would have its 1966 GT350 models in dealerships when Ford released the new '66 Mustangs, Shelby ordered an additional 252 cars from Ford's San Jose plant at the very end of 1965 production.

Most of the changes for 1966 were cosmetic as well as the addition of several new options including a choice of color. Most notably clear Plexiglas rear windows replaced the earlier vents, and function side scoops were installed on the rear quarter panels for rear brake cooling. The front grille was modified with thin bars. The engine remained the same, a Shelby-prepared Ford V8 with a Holley four-barrel carburetor and a considerably quieter exhaust system. The Borg-Warner T10 four-speed manual transmission remained standard. The suspension was much closer to stock, greatly improving the ride and comfort. The optional GT instrument cluster was installed and, for the first time, Shelbys were available with an automatic transmission, fold-down rear seat, and even an optional factory supercharger.

All told, 1,365 cars were built in addition to the 1,000 GT 350H Hertz 'Rent A Racers' and 13 specials and prototypes. Ford was a major shareholder of Hertz and had persuaded the rental car giant to purchase the fastbacks. Total 1966 production reached 2,378 examples. A small number of 1966 models were fitted from the factory with Paxton superchargers, a $670 option which brought horsepower to 440 bhp.

Ford realized that racers were a small share of the market and they wanted the Shelby to appeal to a wider audience. 1966 was the start of the gradual 'toning down.' Friction developed and Shelby would eventually part ways with the project and the later Shelbys would be more of trim package compared to the thoroughbreds they were in the beginning.


By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2020
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
The Shelby Mustang performance muscle car was first built in the 1960's. It was originally a series of Ford Mustangs which were specially modified by Carroll Shelby's company. The program was factory-sponsored and production was eventually moved in-house.

The 1966 was differentiated in body color (non-white versions were introduced - colors included blue, red, green and black, as well as the original white) and trim. The first 252 GT 350's for 1966 were 'carry-over' cars. They had the 1965 Ford Mustang bodies and 1965 Ford Mustang serial numbers under their Shelby serial numbers. They had mostly 1965 features including standard Koni shock and engines painted black.

The 1966 production was 1,373 fastbacks, including two prototypes, four drag cars and 252 'carry-over' models with 1965 Mustang bodies. A total of 1,001 Hertz fastbacks were also produced. Additionally, four convertibles were built, for a total of 2,378 units for 1966.

The Hertz cars were born when Shelby struck a deal with the Hertz Corporation to produce a special line of GT350s for rent which were sold to the public after their rental-car lives were finished. Shelby produced 1001 of these cars: Approximately 800 in Raven Black, and 50 each in Candy Apple Red, Wimbledon White, Sapphire Blue and Ivy Green.

1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM 1507
In 1966 the Shelby GT350 was equipped with a 289 cubic-inch V8 engine that produced 306 horsepower. A bolt-on Paxton supercharger increased horsepower by 46% to an estimated 360 horsepower. The fastback C-pillar vents were replaced with Plexiglas quarter windows. The side air scoops were functional and allowed air to flow to the brakes which kept them cool. The hood was comprised of fiberglass but partway through the year it was replaced with a steel version due to customer complaints about weakness and lack of quality. The only color offered for the interior was black. Other interior items were the competition seat belts, roll bar, and GT 350 center cap found on the steering wheel.

Customers complained that the interior was noisy. In response, the exhaust system exit was moved further behind the driver. The Wimbledon White with blue stripes was a popular color scheme chosen by most buyers. Five new exterior colors were offered this year that included Raven Black, Sapphire Blue, Ivy green, and Candy Apple Red.

The 1966 Shelby GT350 Fastback finished in Candy Apple Red with LeMans stripes was offered for sale at the 2006 Worldwide Group Auction held on Hilton Head Island. It was estimated to fetch between $160,000-$180,000. At the conclusion of the auction, the vehicle had been left unsold. It has its original number-matching 289 high Performance motor. It is equipped with a five-speed manual gearbox but was offered for sale with the factory T-10 four-speed gearbox included with the purchase. It was awarded a 1st place in the 1966 Shelby class at SAAC 28 in Nashville. It has also been awarded many other first and second place finish's in most of the events that it has entered.


By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2006
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S1123
Sold for $101,750 at 2009 The Scottsdale Auction : Gooding & Company.
Peter Brock was Shelby's head designer and one of the individuals responsible for making the necessary modifications to the Shelby Mustang to fix it shortcomings, such as its lack of options and inaccessibility. The cars performance and usability was enhanced, and for 1966, air-intake scoops were added which aided in providing necessary cooling air to the rear brake pads. The C-pillar sail panels were removed and replaced with clear Plexiglas windows. Also, four new color options were added and rear seats could be installed to comply with SCCA racing regulations.

In the Spring of 1966, Young Motor Co. of Charlotte, North Carolina took possession of this car shortly after it had been shipped from Shelby's Los Angeles plant on February 28th. It left the factory finished in green and came equipped with a four-speed transmission and 10-spoke aluminum wheels.

In May of 2003, a rotisserie restoration was completed. It is currently painted in Candy Apple Red and a double clear coat. It rides on its original-type Shelby wheels, correct SIMS oil pan, hollow letter valve covers with proper Buddy Bar casting and a 4:11 posi-traction rear end.

In 2009, this Shelby GT 350 was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction held in Scottsdale, Arizona. It was expected to sell for $90,000 - $120,000 and offered without reserve. The lot was sold for $101,750 including buyer's premium.


By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2009
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S928
Sold for $159,500 at 2012 RM Auctions - Monterey.
Sold for $126,500 at 2019 Barrett-Jackson : Scottsdale, Az..
Carroll Shelby's original GT350 from 1965-1966 was a high-performance trendsetting 'ponycar.' On the track, the GT350 dominated the opposition and secured three straight SCCA B-Production championships for Ford in 1965, 1966, and 1967.

This Mustang GT350 was ordered on January 26, 1966 and delivered new to Archway Motors in Baltimore, Maryland on February 10th. It was purchased by its first owner Yale Kneeland, of New York City, a recent Yale University graduate and racing friend to Mark Donohue. 6S0928 was heavily modified with such features as full SCCA legal roll cage by Holmann & Moody, flared wheel wells, deeper, offset rear American Mag wheels, and fully adjustable Koni shocks. Kneeland raced the car into the early 1970s, campaigning it at many venues on the east coast. In 1967, he secured the N.E. Division production BP Championship.

The current caretaker has owned the car since 1999. A full restoration began in 2008, returning it to its 1967 Kneeland livery and fitted with a correct B Production engine, featuring many original Shelby external and internal engine parts.

The car is powered by a 289 cubic-inch V-8 engine with a single four-barrel carburetor. There is a four-speed manual transmission and rests on a wheelbase that measures 108 inches.

In 2012, this car was offered for sale at RM Auction's Monterey, CA sale. It was estimated to sell for $175,000 - $225,000 and offered without reserve. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $159,500, inclusive of buyer's premium.


By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2012
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S2192
Shelby did not build any GT350R competition cars in 1966. Numbers are not very certain but it seems that 1966 production was considerably higher than 1964/65 with 1373 standard fastbacks, 1003 Hertz models including all prototypes, drag cars and 1965 left over bodies, plus four Convertibles, were built. Total 2,378. Generally the 1966 cars were a little more 'comfortable' with as many as five exterior colors available. But that did not stop this car from racing at Daytona - along with four other Mustangs, one other of which was also a Shelby. Neither 350GTs regrettably finished that particular race but there were many more successes yet to come.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S342
High bid of $275,000 at 2014 Mecum - Monterey. (did not sell)
Sold for $310,000 at 2014 Mecum : Indianapolis.
The Shelby Mustang was a streetable half-step towards the car he really wanted to race - the GT350R, with the 'R' signifying its racing specification. The production GT350 had the suspension, steering, and brakes necessary to make it suitable for SCCA competition. The R-model engines were built to order. They had heads ported and polished by Valley Head Service, Tri-Y headers by Cyclone, a center-pivot-float Holley 715 CFM carburetor on a Cobra intake and flow-through side-exit exhaust. Power produced by the engine ranged from 325 to 360 BHP on the Shelby dynamometer. Differential and engine oil coolers were added, the latter necessitating the distinctive fiberglass front valence that distinguished the R-model. The side and rear windows were made of Plexiglas and the fenders were flared to accommodate wider Goodyear racing tires. Inside was a four-point rollbar welded for safety. They had a quick-fill 37-gallon fuel taken fitted in the trunk. When it entered SCCA B-Production competition, it quickly became the car to beat. In total, Shelby produced just 34 examples of the GT350R.

Several production GT350 models were converted in similar fashion to Shelby's winning GT350R formula. A few even sprung up across the ocean in Britain and Europe. One of those was this 1966 GT350 which was owned and raced by Swiss driver Herbert Muller from 1966 through the early 1970s. It is a European export model shipped to Ford Advanced Vehicles in Slough, England. It was modified with R-Model type racing equipment including a roll bar, oil cooler, 37-gallon fuel tank, fiberglass front valence, American Racing Torque Thrust 'D' alloy wheels and a Weber-inducted GT40 engine built by Holman-Moody.

Mr. Muller began his racing career in 1959 racing motorcycles. He later competed in European hillclimb events. Driving a series of Porsche GT racers, he became especially successful in the FIA European Hillclimb Championship, winning the GT Championship in 1963. He would become an experienced and accomplished driver in the world of sports and prototypes racing until his death at the Nurburgring in 1981.

After his passing, Müller's personal car collection sat dormant until 1985, when Ron Randolph, a civil engineer with the Army Corps of Engineers in Frankfurt and an accomplished restorer of vintage sports cars, learned of the Müller GT350 through exotic car dealer Auto Exclusiv of Zurich, Switzerland, whom Müller's son had asked to broker its sale. After purchasing the car, Randolph and his friend Rich Bard worked over 600 hours to complete a restoration on the car. It was stripped down to bare metal, and repainted in the original Wimbledon White with Guards Blue stripes. Many mechanical components were re-worked or rebuilt including the engine, suspension, and brakes.

The restoration was completed in time for the August 1986 Nurburgring Historic race. The car was subsequently raced regularly by Randolph before being put on display at the Nurburgring Race Car Museum. It later was put on display in Peter Kaus' Rosso Bianco Collection in Aschaffenburg, Germany in 1988. It remained there for 18 years before Randolph once again assumed its care and maintenance.

The car currently retains its Holman-Moody-built GT40 engine and is configured as it was when delivered by Ford Advanced Vehicles. It is officially listed as an Independent GT350 Racer in the Shelby Registry.


By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2014
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
After the new Ford Mustang was introduced in 1964, a guy from Texas by the name of Carroll Shelby was called upon to build on the Ford Total Performance theme. Ford knew their Mustang needed a boost, even though over a million were sold in the first 18 months of production. Quite simply, many thought of the Mustang as a cute secretary's car, one that did not promote the excitement that would spur even more sales.

With the introduction of the high performance K-code 289 V8, Shelby knew he could take things a step further, accepting the challenge, albeit reluctantly. He had spent considerable time working with a variety of high revving Ford engines, and he had the contacts with the Sports Car Club of America headquarters at LAX, he would take mundane Mustangs and create SCCA eligible screamers that would not only be competitive, but would draw attention that would drive sales.

This 1966 GT 350 is one of 28 built in Raven Black, with just seven wearing factory applied white stripes. Affectionately dubbed 'Skunky' for obvious reasons, it was purchased new in 1966 by a rocket scientist who kept it for 28 years, keeping meticulous records during his tenure. Unrestored and nearly all original, it now has 59,000 miles on the odometer and enjoys life exactly as it was meant to: being raced and driven on a regular basis.

1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S021
This 1966 Shelby GT350, chassis SFM6S021, is one of four drag units built and one of only two known to exist. Power is from the 289 cubic-inch, 306 horsepower engine that is mated to a four-speed Borg-Warner T-10 transmission with 4.86:1 gears. The car rides on Casler 'Cheater' slicks on 15-inch steel wheels. There is an NHRA-approved 'Cobra' scattershield Hurst competition-plus shifter, 'AFX' rear torque control arms, driveshaft safety loop, aluminum carburetor, and heater/defroster removed.
By Daniel Vaughan | May 2009
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
This GT350 Mustang is one of 11 cars factory-equipped with a Paxton supercharger. It was originally a Shelby American company car and driven by executive Jack Randall. It has a 289 Hipo engine with supercharger, approximately 400 horsepower and four-speed transmission. Around 1967, it was sold and shipped to San Juan, Puerto Rico, painted white and raced at the Puerto Rico speedway at Salinas. In the late 2000s, the car was given a complete concours restoration to original specifications.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM65011
There were only four drag units produced in 1966 (four were also produced in 1965). This example, chassis number SFM65011, is one of the rarest of the factory-built competition Shelby Mustangs. They were built for competition in the NHRA B/Sports drag class, with Don McCain (Shelby's sales representative and later Supersnake 'Godfather') setting records with his own drag unit, and are considered rarer than the 1965 GT350R model. This example was returned to Shelby in 2006 for restoration back to 1966 specs and has been fitted with a new Shelby-built engine, which was serialized to the car by Shelby.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S564
Sold for $165,000 at 2008 Automobiles of Amelia Island, RM Auctions.
Sold for $104,500 at 2013 RM Auctions - Monterey.
The life of this vehicle began as a rental car for the Hertz 'Rent-A-Racer' program. It was sent to Milo Brooke, Inc in Chicago, Illinois for preparation before being sent to the Hertz Rental Car of Chicago. It was painted in the typical black with gold livery while it served its duties at Hertz. It was later sold to Roger Meinke of Adrian, Michigan and found its way to the racing track. In 2003 it was purchased by Scott Hackenson of Cobra Automotive in Wallingford, Connecticut who completely transformed this car into a proper racing machine. It is finished in a red/gold Hertz paint scheme and made its racing debut in 2005. It has been featured on TV shows and magazines. It is qualified to compete in various racing venues, including SVRA, HSR, SCCA, and SAAC events.

The car has an all-steel body which was prepared by Cobra Automotive. Its 295 cubic-inch V8 engine produces 545 horsepower, has a 12.7:1 compression and a BLP 750cfm Winston Cup race carburetor with an Edelbrock Victor custom ported intake manifold. There is a billet super Hurst shifter and linkage, a race-prepared Jerico transmission, and a 9-inch Ford rear end.

11-inch competition drums can be found in the rear and massive 12-inch discs are in the front. The car rides on four R-model style American Racing wheels with Goodyear vintage 700x15 tires in the rear. The inside features a Kirkey aluminum racing seat with a five-point harness, an R-model style dash and gauges, and Plexiglass front and rear windows.

In 2008 this 1966 Shelby GT 350 Racing Car was brought to the Automobiles of Amelia presented by RM Auctions where it was estimated to sell for $145,000-$185,000. The lot was sold for a high bid of $165,000 including buyer's premium.


By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: 6S2374
- This 1966 Shelby GT350 is the last of the 1964 thru '66 body style Shelby GT.
- The Last 2+2 fastback produced.
- Last 1966 production GT350 shipped to a dealer.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
The car was on display in Mark Martin's Klassix Auto Museum in Daytona Beach until the Museum closed in 2003.

In 1995 Carroll Shelby, Grand Marshall of the Rolex 24, was interviewed by Pat Patterson for a Race Day program at the Museum using the car as a prop in the background. After the interview, Mr. Shelby autographed the inside of the trunk lid.

The car was purchased at Johnny Bolton Ford in Maitland, Florida and has the original dealer emblem.

In 1966, Shelby American built a total of 2378 GT 350s. This car is one of 1368 'Non-Hertz' 1966 Shelby GT 350s. The car sold for $3704.62 on September 22, 1966.

1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
This example is one of 2,377 Shelbys built in 1966 and one of 1,368 non-Hertz Rent-A-Racers. The 1966 GT 350 is powered by the Ford 289 cubic-inch motor modified to develop 305 horsepower. It is fitted with a highly improved suspension as well as high performance brake and exhaust system to make it a high performance sports car.

The current owner purchased the car in 1974 and drove it for several years. It was then stored until 2000 when it had a complete mechanical and cosmetic restoration by Capaldi Enterprises in Ohio. The restoration was completed in 2004 and is being shown here, at the 2007 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance, for the first time.

1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S222
Sold for $135,000 at 2017 Mecum : Monterey.
This car is a 'Holdover' car. Ford shut down the Mustang assembly line in the summer of 1965 for a few weeks in order to change over to the 1966 model. They sent Shelby 254 of 1965 cars before shutting down the line so Shelby could keep production going and deliver a 1966 GT=350. It was sold as a 1966 GT-350.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
This car is the prototype for the 1966 Shelby GT350 model year and is the only car produced that year with the 'Pony Interior.' This car started out as a fully complete 'K' code fastback model that Carroll Shelby acquired from Ford instead of a partially built car as was the norm. Because of this the car differs from the usual production Shelby GT350s especially the blue vinyl top. This was done as an experiment but when it was finished Carroll Shelby hated it and it never became an option. The car was sold to Hayward Motors in California in May of 1966 and was used as the dealership demonstrator. Its current owner restored this historic GT350 in 2012 and it received a Platinum award at its first SAAC concours.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
This candy apple red Shelby GT350 has spent its entire life in the San Jose, California area after serving as a 'test car' for rear sway bar development for Shelby. Its current owner bought the car in 1989 after one of the previous owners auto-crossed the car extensively and made modifications to the body to accommodate larger wheels and tires in 1968. An extensive restoration was undertaken in 2004 and all non-original body modifications were correct with Ford factory parts. It has the factory correct exterior and interior and has been repainted in its original color scheme.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM6S648
This car has been vintage racing in Australia since 2004 - at the Sydney Retro Speedfest in June in 2015, for example, and prior to that was raced in SCCA B-production at tracks all over the United States such as Bryar Motorsports Park, NH; Continental Divide Raceway, CO; Albuquerque, NM; Lime Rock, CT; Watkins Glen, NY; Pocono, PA; Road America, WI; and Summit Point, WV.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
Chassis #: SFM 6S2363
Sold for $220,000 at 2016 RM Sotheby's : Monterey.
This GT350, was born a road-ready example and finished in Sapphire Blue. It was shipped to Paradise Ford of Scottsdale, Arizona, and purchased new by Jerry and Kathi Stewart of Greer, Arizona, on September 21st of 1966. The Stewarts immediately began racking up miles on their Shelby, both on the road and with Kathi behind the wheel at autocross events.

Jim Emert of Scottsdale purchased the car in 1969, and had it race-prepared by Don Roberts. With Roberts behind the wheel, the Shelby won five races in the 1970 season, claiming the SCCA B-Production Southern Pacific Division Championship. Roberts also drove the GT350 when it finished 4th in class at the 1970 American Road Race of Champions.

Don and Sharon Roberts purchased the car for the 1971 season, with Don continuing the driving duties. During the season, he won twice in the B-Production class and finished 3rd at the American Road Race of Champions at Road Atlanta.

For the 1972 season, the car was sold to John Goodson of Tallahassee, Florida and was prepped for IMSA competition.

Jere L. Clark of Phoenix purchased it eleven years later, and had Phil Roberts and Danny Ranshaw further prepare the car for vintage competition. The car's first vintage race was the 1983 Monterey Historics and the car was routinely campaigned until 1990, when it was put into storage. The car's best outing with Jere driving was a 1st place overall finish at the 1988 Monterey Historics.

Jim Click purchased the car in 2002, who has continued to race the GT350. Prior to the 2015 Monterey Historics, the car was given a full engine rebuild.


By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2016
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
The first G.T.350 was little more than an SCCA B Production race car with a license plate. Shelby, for 1966, installed a less aggressive exhaust, a differential with different ratio, Plexiglass rear quarter windows, and a calmer suspension setup. It still has a 306 horsepower 289 CID V8, with a 4-barrel Holley carburetor on a changed intake manifold than the stock Ford and a 4-speed Borg Warner transmission with a Hurst shifter.
1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
The 1965 Shelby GT350 was not well received as a family car. The side-exiting exhaust was loud and the only color available was Wimbledon White. Carroll Shelby needed to sell cars, so for 1966, he moved the exhaust to the standard location in the rear valance and added four new colors: Candy Apple Red, Sapphire Blue, Raven Black and Ivy Green. Shelby Motors also added a fold down rear seat for 1966. The first 82 cars did not have this option because they were left over from the 1965 model year. Known as the 'carry-over' cars, they now sell for a premium due to their rarity.

This Candy Apple Red Shelby appears with rarely seen standard gray painted wheels. A low optioned car, it was ordered without the LeMans center stripes.

1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350
Coupe
This Sapphire Blue GT350 was featured in the Ford Motor Company's traveling display - '1966 Ford Motorama.' It was also used as an evaluation vehicle for the automotive press and by Carroll Shelby as a prototype for future products and design. The first registered owner was Oliver Ray Price, then a writer for Motor Trend and other automotive publications, and subsequently the Owner/President of 'Wonder Works' movie studio. The California black license plates on the car were originally registered to Mr. Price. This GT350 is one of very few cars built with automatic transmission and not sold to Hertz, for their 'Rent a Racer' program.

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The Mustang was introduced at the 1965 New York Worlds Fair, Mustang Mania instantly swept the country, and a new automotive market segment was created - the 22 or better known as the ponycar. Though its mechanical underpinnings descended from the Falcon, the Mustang was completely different. It was a compact, tight, clean package weighing in at a modest 2,550 pounds - a departure from the ever-enlarging....
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The Ford Mustang first appeared in 1964 and was immediately popular for its style and its capabilities. The largest engine offering of the time was the 289 V-8 K-code small block engine which was sufficient but enthusiasts wanted and demanded more power. The base engine was a six-cylinder power plant. The body style configurations included coupe, convertible and fastback. In its first year of....
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A pillar of American automotive lore, the Mustang is the vehicle the brought sporting dash and styling at a price that almost everyone could afford. Always extraordinarily attractive, the Mustang has been capturing the hearts of drivers for nearly 40 years. Introducing a whole new breed of automobile, the pony car, Ford wasnt content to stand on the sidelines while others jumped ahead. Rather than....
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Recent Vehicle Additions

Performance and Specification Comparison

Model Year Production

#1#2#3Ford
1971Ford (2,054,351)Chevrolet (1,830,319)Volkswagen (1,128,784)2,054,351
1970Ford (2,096,184)Chevrolet (1,451,305)Volkswagen (1,193,853)2,096,184
1969Chevrolet (2,092,947)Ford (1,826,777)Volkswagen (1,241,580)1,826,777
1968Chevrolet (2,139,290)Ford (1,753,334)Volkswagen (1,191,854)1,753,334
1967Chevrolet (2,206,639)Ford (1,730,224)Toyota (1,068,321)1,730,224
1966Ford (2,212,415)Chevrolet (2,206,639)Volkswagen (1,168,146)2,212,415
1965Chevrolet (2,375,118)Ford (2,170,795)Volkswagen (1,174,687)2,170,795
1964Chevrolet (2,318,619)Ford (1,594,053)Toyota (1,068,321)1,594,053
1963Chevrolet (2,237,201)Ford (1,525,404)Fiat (957,941)1,525,404
1962Chevrolet (2,061,677)Ford (1,476,031)Fiat (957,941)1,476,031
1961Ford (1,338,790)Chevrolet (1,318,014)Volkswagen (807,488)1,338,790

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HURLEY HAYWOOD HONORED WITH RRDC'S 2014 PHIL HILL AWARD

HURLEY HAYWOOD HONORED WITH RRDC'S 2014 PHIL HILL AWARD

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (Jan. 24, 2014) - Hurley Haywood, winner of more endurance classics than any other driver in racing history, was honored by the Road Racing Drivers Club with the 2014 Phil Hill...

RRDC VOTES IN 37 NEW MEMBERS FOR 2013

HILLIARD, Ohio (Nov. 7, 2013) - Thirty-seven race-car drivers and motorsports professionals have been voted into the Road Racing Drivers Club in 2013. The group includes 13 Regular Members from...

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