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Image credits: © Lamborghini.

1970 Lamborghini Miura P400S news, pictures, specifications, and information

Ferruccio Lamborghini entered the automobile business in 1963. His previous efforts were in the tractor manufacturing business, modifying military surplus equipment for civilian use.

Lamborghini felt that he had to build a supercar that would top anything Ferrari or Maserati had to offer. He hired two young engineers, Gianpaolo Dallara and Paulo Stanzani to build the Miura. It was named for the famed Spanish fighting bulls. The Miura's appearance is stunning, with clam shell style bonnets and a four litre V12 engine. The Miura is also the first to use Campagnola wheels with a central locking nut, just like a racecar.

Introduced in 1965, and capable of 180 mph, it is a success. This car was restored by Lamborghini expert Gary Bobilef, in 2000. It was unveiled at the Miura reunion at Concourso Italiano that same year. It won the Peoples' Choice. It also won 'Best Lamborghini' at Pocono, a 'Celebration of Speed & Design' in 2004.
Coupe
Designer: Bertone
Chassis Num: 4027
Engine Num: 30355
 
The Lamborghini Miura P400 S could race from zero-to-140 in less than 30 seconds. The excellent power of the Miura was matched by its Bertone styled body that was both exotic and elegant. This red 1970 Lamborghini Miura P400S has chassis number 4027 and is powered by a 3929-cc mid-transverse mounted DOHC V12 engine that can produce 370 horsepower. The engine is matted to a five-speed manual gearbox which sends power to the rear wheels. The brakes are four-wheel ventilated disc brakes that helps keep the 98.6-inch wheelbase vehicle under the driver's control. It was offered for sale at the 2006 Gooding & Company Auction where it was one of the highlights of the auction.

There were 140 Lamborghini Miura P400 S models created with less than 100 still in existence (estimated). This example has been the product of a recent and comprehensive professional restoration that took three years. It has only been shown at the 2005 Concorso Italiano where it was awarded the Pebble's Choice Award.

At the Gooding & Company Auction, the car was left unsold.

By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2007
Coupe
Designer: Bertone
Chassis Num: 4428
 
Sold for $473,000 at 2007 RM Auctions.
This 1970 Lamborghini Miura S was brought to the 2007 Monterey Sports & Classic Car Auction presented by RM Auctions, where it had an estimated value of $350,000 - $450,000. It is powered by a four-liter alloy V12 engine with Weber carburetors and 370 available horsepower. There is a five-speed manual gearbox and four-wheel disc brakes.

The world was given their first glimpse of the Miura at the 1966 Geneva Motor Show which began on March 10th. The name was derived from a famous Spanish breeder of bulls and its lightweight frame, impressive list of specifications, all independent suspension, and mid-engine layout truly impressed.

In 1968 the 'S', for 'Spinto' or tuned, was introduced, featuring a 370 horsepower engine, upgraded brakes and numerous other enhancements. It was a faster car, sporting better performance and more luxurious amenities throughout.

This example is an 'S' model that was delivered new to Rainer Haas in August of 1970 and registered as HH XS 701. In 1974 ownership passed to Peter Eckel of Hamberg, Germany. By the 1980s it was in the possession of a London, England resident and property developer named Tom Forrest. The car remained in his care until 1992, when it was sold to a Germany resident, Mr. Denner. While in Mr. Denner's care, the car was sent to Lamborghini specialists Hoecker where it was treated a comprehensive overhaul. The car was later sold to a UK resident where it has remained until being brought to the 2007 Monterey Sports & Classic Car Auction presented by RM Auctions, where it had an estimated value of $350,000 - $450,000. Bidding surpassed the estimated value, selling for $473,000 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2007
Coupe
Designer: Bertone
 
Unrestored, original Miuras are very, very rare. The reason being that they are hand built, innovative yet complex cars that are by their very nature maintenance challenged. For a moment, just think how hot that V12 motor might get hidden transverse and amidships and left to the devices of mid-sixties engineering and materials technology. This one still rides on its original tires.

The Miura S was the second generation with around 338 cars built between December 1968 and March of 1971, only 30 of which were fitted with air conditioning. Heat, both inside and out, was a real problem however it was soon forgotten once on the open road.
Coupe
Designer: Bertone
Chassis Num: LAM451570
 
Sold for $423,500 at 2008 Russo & Steele.
Ferruccio Lamborghini entered the automobile business in 1963. His previous efforts were in the tractor manufacturing business, modifying military surplus equipment for civilian use. The creative entrepreneur and car buff in his own right felt that he had to build a supercar that would top anything Ferrari or Maserati had to offer. He hired two young engineers, Gianpaolo Dallara and Paulo Stanzani to begin designing this new car.

The Miura was first shown to the public at the November 1965 Turin Auto Show. At the time, it did not have a body. It was just a rolling-chassis. The design was mid-engined, a very revolutionary technique at the time. When Nuccio Bertone was chosen to carry out the body design, he gave the project to Marcello Gandini. In early 1966 the Bertone body and the chassis designed by Dallara and Stanzani were assembled into one unit. The world was given their first glimpse of the completed Miura at the 1966 Geneva Motor Show, which began on March 10th. Not surprisingly, the revolutionary vehicle named for a breed of Spanish fighting bulls was instantly popular, wîth demand outstripping supply. Ferrucio Lamborghini had originally planned the Miura to be a low production, halo car wîth production set to around 30 models, but the car's lightweight frame, impressive list of specifications, all independent suspension, and mid-engine layout truly impressed all who had money for The Next Big Thing burning holes in their pockets in Lamborghini's direction. In all, even though offered at a price of nearly $20,000, 108 units were constructed in the first year.

The Miura's appearance is indisputably stunning, wîth clamshell-style bonnets and a four liter V12 engine putting out 305 bhp. The Miura is also the first road-going automobile to use Campagnolo wheels wîth a central locking nut, just like a racecar. In 1968 the 'S', for 'Spinto' or 'tuned', was introduced at the Turin Auto Show, featuring an upgraded 370 horsepower engine thanks in part through the use of a new combustion chamber and larger intakes, upgraded brakes and numerous other enhancements; even air conditioning was available at extra cost. The 'S' was an even faster car, sporting better performance and more luxurious amenities throughout, and could sprint from zero-to-140 in less than 30 seconds. Stopping power and lateral stability was enhanced by ventilated disc brakes and a modified rear suspension. The excellent power of the Miura was matched by its Bertone styled body that was both exotic and elegant in a graceful, flowing harmony.

This 1970 Miura S is finished in Fly Yellow wîth a blue leather interior. This car has traveled a mere 200 miles since a 3 year complete mechanical overhaul wîth documents and receipts totalling $90,000.

In 2008 this vehicle was offered for sale at the Russo & Steele Auction in Monterey, California.

Source - Russo & Steele
Coupe
Designer: Bertone
Chassis Num: 4413
Engine Num: 30453
 
Sold for $352,000 at 2008 RM Auctions.
This 1970 Lamborghini Miura P400 S is chassis number 4413 and left the factory on January 22nd of 1970. It is production number 463 with engine number 30453. It was finished in fly yellow with black skai (vinyl) interior and was delivered to dealer S.E.A. By the 1990s it was residing in Japan where it had been painted red. A restoration soon followed. This process was documented in the 2003 issue of the Japanese magazine Rosso. During the restoration, it was repainted in its original fly yellow and the rocker panels were correctly finished in black.

In 2008, this vehicle was offered for sale at the 'Sports & Classics of Monterey' presented by RM Auctions. It had an estimated value of $350,000 - $400,000. The lot was sold for a high bid of $352,000, including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2009
The Miura was first show to the public at the November 1965 Turin Auto Show. At the time, it did not have a body. It was just a rolling-chassis. The design was mid-engined, very revolutionary at the time. Bertone was chosen to body the vehicle. Nuccio Bertone gave the project to Marcello Gandini. In early 1966 the Bertone body and the chassis designed by Giampaolo Dallara were assembled into one unit. In completed form, it was show to the public at the 1966 Geneva Auto Show and dubbed the Miura. The name coming from a breed of Spanish fighting bulls.
The vehicle was instantly popular with demand overshadowing the supply. Ferrucio Lamborghini had originally planned the Miura to be a low production, flagship vehicle with production set to around 30 models. The demand for the vehicle eventually changed the plan for the vehicle and throughout its lifespan, three series of the Miura were produced, the P400, S, and the SV. Each series brought with it mechanical and aesthetical changes through either fixed problems from the prior series or brought about new developmental improvements.

The P400 was the first series, the 'P' stood for Posteriore, the location of the engine. The 400 represented the engine size, or 4.0 liters. The four-liter engine was capable of producing 350 horsepower to the rear wheels. The spot-welded chassis was made from steel and the steering was a rack-and-pinion unit built and designed by Lamborghini. The front and rear hoods were both 'clamshell' design. There were two small compartments in the rear allowing a small amount of luggage or storage space.

Since the vehicle had been initially intended to be a temporary vehicle, it was poorly assembled and lacked quality. Another major problem was the lack of materials available. The builders of the vehicle rarely had the parts and resources they needed to keep up with demand. As time progressed, so did the quality.

Production began in March of 1967 and offered at a price of nearly $20,000 US dollars with 108 units being constructed. The Miura S series appeared in December of 1968. It was debuted to the public at the 1968 Turin Auto Show. The 'S' stood for 'Spinto' meaning 'Pushed' or 'Tuned'. Horsepower had been increased to 370, thanks in part through the use of a new combustion chamber and larger intakes. The later 'S' series models were given ventilated disc brakes and a modified rear suspension. Air conditioning was available for an extra cost.

In March of 1971, the final version of the Miura, the SV, was displayed at the Geneva Auto Show. The SV was the pinnacle of performance in regards to the Miura series. The rear suspension received modifications including a wider track. Wider tires were placed increasing the performance and handling. The headlights, turn signals, bumper and tail lights received changes. A carburetor change and larger intakes brought the horsepower rating to 385. During its production lifespan only 142 examples of the Miura SV were created. The acronym 'SV' represented 'Sprint Veloce'.

750 examples of the Miuras were built, the last being constructed on October 12, 1973. Production would have continued but Lamborghini was preparing to introduce its successor, the Countach. Since Lamborghini was a small shop, it could only handle the production of one model.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jun 2006
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