AMC AMX

AMC AMX III
1970 AMC AMX III
Original Price: $10,000
Chassis Profiles
AMC AMX
1970 AMC AMX
Produced: 4,116
Original Price: $4,000
Average Auction Sale: $28,345
Chassis Profiles
AMC AMX II Concept
1969 AMC AMX II Concept
Original Price: $3,297
Average Auction Sale: $20,350
Chassis Profiles
AMC AMX III
1969 AMC AMX III
Original Price: $10,000
Average Auction Sale: $891,000
Chassis Profiles
AMC AMX
1969 AMC AMX
Original Price: $3,290
Average Auction Sale: $23,685
Chassis Profiles
AMC AMX
1968 AMC AMX
Original Price: $3,250
Average Auction Sale: $25,358
Chassis Profiles
The AMC AMX, representing American Motors Experimental, was produced in low production numbers produced during the late 1960s and early 1970s. It had similarities to AMC's pony car, the Javelin, but was smaller and had seating for two. The AMX was not only sporty and attractive, but it introduced many 'industry firsts', including being the first production vehicle to use a one-piece injection molded dashboard which greatly improved safety for its occupants. In 1969 and 1970 it was named 'Best Engineered Car of the Year' by the American Automotive Society of Engineers.

There were multiple engines available to the buyer. From 1968 through 1970 a four-barrel carbureted eight-cylinder engine could be had in 290, 343, 360 and 390 cubic-inch flavors. Power was sent to the rear wheels courtesy of the standard T-10 four-speed manual gearbox. Dual exhaust and a special traction bar were also included as standard equipment. Adding to the sporty persona were extra wide tires which provided extra traction and enhanced performance.

In 1968 AMC produced 6,725 examples of the AMX. The following year 8,2963 were produced and in 1970 sales dipped to 4,116. There were 52 examples of the Hurst-modified SS/AMX drag strip racing versions. These are highly sought after in modern times as collector cars.

The AMC AMX was popular on the racing circuit, especially at drag strips. The potent engines and wide tires made them very competitive. The AMX captured the Super Stock Championship title multiple years. Craig Breedlove, a renowned driver with years of experience and many titles was hired by AMC to help further the career performance of the AMX. He did so by breaking over 100 records including the 24 hour average speed record which he averaged 130 mph. The previous record had been 103 mph.

From 1971 through 1974 the AMX name was used on the Javelin indicating the performance option. It was used again in 1977 as a performance option on the Hornet. The following year it was applied to the Concord and in 1979 and 1980 it appeared on the Spirit.

There were three concept versions of the AMX created, known as the AMX/1, AMX/2, and AMX/3. The first operational AMX prototype was debuted in 1966 and resided for a number of years in the Talledega Speedway museum. Two rolling prototypes were made of the AMX/2, with one being used for many years atop of a pole of a used car dealership. In 1970 AMC commissioned ItalDesign to create a mid-engined high-performance version of the AMX, dubbed the AMX/3. The design was mostly by AMC designer Richard 'Dick' Teague and production was done at the former Bizzarrini factory located in Turin, Italy. Only six versions were created from 1969 through 1972. Located mid-ship was a 390 cubic-inch AMC V8 capable of producing 340 horsepower. A custom made OTO Melara five-speed manual gearbox was used and top speed was achieved at 160 mph.
By Daniel Vaughan | May 2006
AMC Models


Vehicle information, history, and specifications from concept to production.

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