1961 Alvis TD21 Series I

1961 Alvis TD21 Series I 1961 Alvis TD21 Series I 1961 Alvis TD21 Series I
Coupe
Coachwork: Park Ward & Co.
Chassis #: 26294
The Alvis TD21 was launched in late 1958 and drew stylistic inspiration from the special-order Hermann Graber Coupe variant of the TC21/100. With production by Park Ward, the TD21's two-door metal coachwork featured more luggage and interior space than the preceding model. It rode on a rigid, cross-braced box-section chassis with an independent coil and wishbone front suspension and a leaf-spring setup on the rear axle. Power was from a 2993cc overhead valve straight-six for which an improved 12-port cylinder head was soon added after full production commenced. Buyers had the choice of either a four-speed manual or Borg Warner three-speed automatic transmission. Lockheed servo-assisted front disc brakes were initially offered as an option but later became standard fare. Drum brakes were in the rear. The steering was a Burman recirculating ball system. Bodystyles included either a Drophead Coupe or a Saloon. The interior featured leather upholstery, pile carpets and polished wood fascia.

This Alvis TS21 is one of 784 Series I examples built from 1958 through 1961. It has spent much of its life in California and wears a body by Park Ward. The car has been given a restoration and finished in Azure Blue with Biscuit interior. It rides on chrome wire wheels and is powered by a 3-liter 115 horsepower engine.


By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2016
1961 Alvis TD21 Series I 1961 Alvis TD21 Series I 1961 Alvis TD21 Series I
Coupe
Coachwork: Park Ward & Co.
This is a 1961 Alvis TD21 with a convertible body created by the legendary coachbuilder, Park Ward. The car is finished in an attractive light blue with matching biscuit leather interior and dark blue top. The design is simple, smooth, and elegant, with many features indicative of Park Wards style. The grill, with its vertical louvers, is similar to those found on Park Ward bodied Rolls Royce or Bentleys of the same era. The headlamps extend slightly farther than the rest of the body, and curve gracefully into the hood, another signature of Park Wards work. The rear-quarter panels, as they curve slightly away from the body, is another feature. In many respects, this is similar to a Park Ward bodied Bentley S1 Continental, though sitting on a smaller wheelbase and different front fender designs.

The owner of this magnificent car has drive it from NC to PA to show it at the Easter Concours of the United States, on at least two occasions.


By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2008
The first vehicles to bear the Alvis name, founded by Thomas George John and G. P. de Freville, appeared in 1920. Production of the Alvis vehicles would last for 47 years ending in 1967. The vehicles quickly built a reputation for performance and for their durability, and quality craftsmanship. The company, during its lifespan, would also be involved in the production of aero-engines and military vehicles.

The Speed 20 was introduced in 1932 and were available in various configuration. Production would continue until 1936. The 4 door touring version was the standard configuration with Cross & Ellis handling these coachwork orders. The 4 door saloon was courtesy of Charlesworth. The two door tourer, two door sports saloon, and drophead coupe versions were created by Vanden Plas.

When introduced the engine offered was a six-cylinder unit with pushrod overhead valves, three SU carburetors and about 86 horsepower. Their engines were referred to as 'Silver Eagles'. The suspension was comprised of semi-elliptic in the front and rear. 14 inch drum brakes provided the stopping power. Specifications varied and were continually improved. In 1933 the Crested Eagle was introduced which used an independent suspension with a transverse leaf spring and wishbone setup.

In 1933 Alvis introduced to the world a gearbox with synchromesh on all forward gears. This advancement made the vehicles much easier to drive and offered considerably better performance.

In 1936 production of the Speed 20 ceased with around 750 examples being produced.

In the post World War II era, production resumed with the TA14 which drew its design inspiration from the 12/70 of the pre-war era. Under the bonnet was a four-cylinder engine which was solid, durable, and adequate to carry the car at speed. This vehicle represented a major accomplishment for the Alvis Company. The factories and production methods of the Alvis Company, like so many other war-torn European Companies, had sustained much damage due to the war. The Company was used to producing a rolling chassis and allowing final assemble to be handled by custom coachbuilders. Many of those coachbuilders had not survived the war; the ones that had were quickly acquired by other manufacturers trying to re-establish themselves as a business.

A new engine and chassis were created by the early 1950s. The engine had six-cylinders and displaced three-liters. Both the chassis and the engine would persist with the company during its remaining lifespan - which lasted until 1967.

The Saloon bodied cars were dubbed the TA21 and were designed by Mulliners of Birmingham, just as its TA14 sibling had been. Tickford was tasked with creating the dropheads; this was their talent which they provided to other British marques, such as MG.

It was not long before Tickford and Mulliner were acquired by other companies, Standard Triumph and Aston Martin respectively. Alvis turned to Graber of Switzerland to aid in production. From 1955, all Alvis bodied cars were based on designs created by Graber. Willowbrook of Loughborough was tasked with final assembly. The cars created during this era are among the most attractive and sought after of the Alvis history. Few were created, mostly due to the high cost of creating these one-off designed cars.

In 1958, the TD21 began production with Park Ward building the bodies. This was a good attempt at full-scale production, and was soon followed by the TE21 and the TF21 models. The TF21 was introduced in 1966 in both Saloon and Drophead configuration. The purchaser had a choice of their manual or automatic geaboxes, and had a top speed of over 125 mph, the fastest vehicle Alvis ever produced during its entire lifespan. In total, 109 examples of the TF21 were created before the company ceased production in 1967. They were unable to compete with other marques in terms of price and modernization. The company switched their business to the production of armored protected vehicle production. The were incorporated into British Leyland and became apart of Rover, which was later bought by United Scientific Holdings plc in 1981 and the name was changed to Alvis plc.


By Daniel Vaughan | Jul 2007



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