1933 SS Cars SS1

1933 SS Cars SS1 1933 SS Cars SS1 1933 SS Cars SS1 Saloon
SS Cars Ltd of Foleshill, Coventry offered a 9 horsepower, 1006cc SS2 for the 1933 season along with a 15.9 horsepower 2054cc unit on the SS1. Their vehicles were both stylish and sporty.
At the 26th Motor Exhibition at Olympia in October 1932 Swallow Coachbuilding Co. Ltd., as they were then called, displayed their productions in the coachbuilders' section of the show, as the SS had not yet been regarded as a marque in its own right. Other companies in this highly competitive group included Riley, MG, and Singer. Their goal was to produce a budget-priced sports car for a market that was quickly emerging from a recession and a depression. The SS Company was a late starter in this group, announcing their SS1 model in September of 1932 of the 1933 season. It had a long wheelbase chassis that measured 9 feet and 11 inches and the coachwork reflected the elegant flowing wings styled by Mr. Lyon's himself. In the back, the vehicle featured an underslung chassis with centre cruciform bracing. The Standard engines now featured aluminum cylinder heads with higher compression ratios, gave the vehicle a sporty persona. The early models suffered from heating problems, but this problem was soon rectified.

The large wheelbase offered comfortable four-passenger accommodation. The flowing front wings, sweeping into integral running boards, gave it a striking appearing. The upswept scuttle on the open four-seaters deflected the wind when driving with windscreen folded flat.

In 1931 the Swallow Coachbuilding Company of Coventry, England, used a Standard Motor Company 16 horsepower, 2.054 liter inline six-cylinder motor and a low-slung chassis to create the SS1 - a sharp contrast to other sports cars of the era. In 1934 the Company was renamed S.S. Cars Ltd. and then in 1945 it became Jaguar, in accord with the name of its very popular sports models.

The Jaguar SS1 was produced from 1934 through 1936. These were a further evolution of William Lyons' Swallow coach-built bodies that had been used on various types of chassis during the late 1920s. Morris, Fiat, Austin, and Standard were a few of the automakers that commissioned the Swallow bodies.

In 1931 Standard produced a chassis that was intended only for Swallow bodies. This union between the two companies would for the Standard Swallow, more commonly known as 'SS.' Within a few years, in 1933, the SS Cars Ltd was official and offered a variety of bodystyles, chassis, and configurations.

In 1934 the SSI model line-up grew in versatility with the introduction of the 'four light' salon body. It was given this name due to its four side windows. Inside, it offered more room for the occupants then prior versions.

Automobile production ceased during the Second World War. At the conclusion of the War, Lyons dropped the 'SS' name and formed the Jaguar Marque.


By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2008
The origination of the SS letters designated by Jaguar founder Sir William Lyons, has always been controversial. As his original firm was known as the 'Swallow Sidecar Company', that seems a logical explanation. The SS-100, was the first in a long line of high performance production cars that looked as fast as they went. They were one of the first cars to bear the Jaguar name, although at the time it was just a nameplate; it wouldn't become the corporation's umbrella brand name until after World War II.

William Lyons was born in 1901 and became a keen motorcyclist in his teens. This lead to a friendship with William Walmsley, an individual who was building motorcycle sidecars in a garage on his property. Soon, Lyons was assisting Walmsley's business, and soon the Swallow Sidecar Co., was formed.

The company was formed on September 4, 1922, Lyons' 21st birthday. Production was small at first, but soon drew the attention of the motoring press. This led the company to broaden its horizons to motor cars.

The Swallow Sidecar company became the Swallow Sidecar and Coach Building Co., in 1926. It would continue to move towards full-scale car production. In 1931, the word sidecar disappeared from the company's name, became the Swallow Coachbuilding Co., Ltd. The acquired new facilities in Coventry, which was in close proximity to the Standard Motor Co., Ltd, which supplied engines, underpinnings, and other parts for the Swallow company. A short time later, the companies name was again changed, this time to S.S. Cars, Ltd. and became a publicly-held company.

The SS90 made its debut in 1935. It had a long, louvered hood and low slung coachwork. The 2.7-liter Standard side-valve six-cylinder engine was suitable, but was not a performance powerhouse. It did, however, served as a transition step between the SS1 roadster and the SS100. In total, only 21 examples were produced.

The SS100 had a similar underslung chassis similar to the SS90. The wheelbase measured 104 inches. Under the hood was a Standard six-cylinder engine with a new overhead valve design with aluminum pistons, augmented by a robust bottom end and seven main bears. With the help of two SU carburetors, the engine was capable of producing just over 100 horsepower at 4500RPM, compared to 68 horsepower.

The engine was fitted to a four-speed gearbox with synchromesh engagement in the top three gears. 15-inch Girling aluminum drum brakes were rod-actuated and brought the 18-inch center-lock Dunlop racing wheels to a stop. The suspension was typical for the period, with semi-elliptic leaf springs at all four corners.
The SS100 soon earned a reputation for its performance and handling characteristics. Along with performance, the car had rakish good looks. The '100' in its name was supposed to represent its top speed, but in testing the car did not achieve this figure. Its top speed was close, at 95 mph. Zero-to-sixty was achieved at about 12 to 14 seconds.

Further work was done on the engine, increasing the bore from 73mm to 82mm, and the stroke received similar treatment, being stretched from 106 to 110mm. This resulted in a displacement size increase from 2664cc to 3486cc. Valve diameters expanded, connecting rods were a high-strength steel alloy, and the crankshaft turned in sturdier main bearings. The compression ratio was reduced from 7.6:1 to 7.2:1, and the engine's peak output rpm diminished slightly, thanks to the longer stroke—from 4,600 rpm to 4,250.

Horsepower rose from 102 to 125 horsepower. A new transmission, driveshaft, and differential were added. The result was a zero-to-sixty time in just over 10 seconds and finally capable of topping the 100 mph barrier.

There were 190 examples of the 2.5-liter SS 100s to leave the factory. There were 118 examples of the 3.5-liter vehicles. A SS100 Coupe was created for the 1938 London Motor Show at Earls Court, but never made it past the prototype status.


By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2009
In 1935 the 'Jaguar' name sprang upon the scene for the first time with a completely new saloon and sports car range. William Heynes had been working to produce a completely new box section cruciform braced chassis for a vastly improved new model range. Meanwhile Weslake had been turning his talents to the Standard engine and by adopting overhead valves he succeeded in increasing output from 75 hp of the previous 21/2 litre sidevalve engine to no less than 105 hp. For the new chassis and engine unit, Lyons designed a fresh body style, less flamboyant than previous models, yet still stylish. Indeed it was closer to contemporary Bentleys which cost nearly four times the price!

Sophistication was increasing, and now customers were offered four doors for the first time on an SS. Indeed so different were the new models that it was felt that a new model name was needed. The Company's advertising agency suggested 'Jaguar' and though Lyons took some persuading, it was finally adopted. Thus the new cars would be known as SS Jaguars. The 'Jaguar' name was an ideal choice - feline grace and elegance, combining docility with remarkable power and agility. The cars have matured and developed to justify the analogy in every way. With typical showmanship, Lyons had arranged a lunch at the Mayfair Hotel in London to launch the new model to the press a few days before the 1935 Motor Show. The SS Jaguar 21/2 litre saloon was unveiled to much favourable comment and the assembled company were asked to guess the price. The average guess was £632. The actual price… just £395.

All the earlier SS designs had been superseded with the exception of the larger Tourer body which lived on with a revised radiator grille and the fitment of the new 21/2 litre engine. The superb new sports car design, which had been glimpsed just briefly as the SS 90, reappeared in similar form as the SS Jaguar 100. With a revised treatment around the fuel tank area at the rear, and more importantly, the adoption of the new chassis and engine, the company now produced a sports car to be proud of. For many, the SS 100 is a pre-war classic amongst sports cars. The price, incidentally, was just £395. This new model was to be used to considerable effect in competitions, both national and international.

1933 SS Cars SS1In 1936 the motoring journalist Tom Wisdom, driving with his wife Elsie, won the International Alpine Trials in an SS 100. This car, which came to be known as 'Old Number 8' was run very successfully at the Brooklands circuit by Wisdom and in the Shelsley Walsh hillclimb by Coventry garage and theatre owner, Sammy Newsome. A year later a team of three cars was entered by the factory in the RAC Rally, the premier rally event in Britain. The team, which included the Hon. Brian Lewis (later Lord Essendon) took the Manufacturer's Team Prize but outright success eluded them. Instead the event was won by a privately entered SS 100! A new, enlarged 31/2 litre engine had been developed and tested in 'Old Number 8'. In September 1937, this engine, together with a new 11/2 litre unit, joined the 21/2 litre version in a completely revised model range. The new models were not very different in appearance, distinguished from their predecessors by the lack of the side mounted spare wheel, but the range now employed 'all steel' construction. Additionally the old Tourer was replaced by Drophead versions of the saloon in each engine size.

Heynes had designed a further stronger chassis for the new body construction resulting in more interior space and bigger doors. Prices ranged from £298 for the 11/2 litre saloon to £465 for the 31/2 litre Drophead Coupe. The new 31/2 litre engine was fitted to the '100' model and this gave genuine sports car performance with sixty miles per hour reached from a standstill in 10.5 seconds and a top speed of over 100 mph. At £445 the bigger-engined SS 100 was in a class of its own. Meanwhile the experimental 31/2 litre unit fitted to 'Old Number 8' was being increasingly modified. Responsible for this work was a man who had accepted the position of Chief Experimental Engineer with SS in 1938. His name was Walter Hassan, a man destined to become a legend in the motor racing world and one who would play an important role in the Jaguar story. For the Motor Show of that year Lyons had designed a stylish closed body for the SS 100. Reminiscent of the Bugattis of the period, just one was made before the outbreak of World War Two decreed an end to car production.

Source - Jaguar

Concepts by SS Cars

SS Cars Monthly Sales Volume

October 2018
2,648
September 2018
2,040
August 2018
2,469
July 2018
1,880
June 2018
2,353
May 2018
2,366
February 2018
2,185
January 2018
2,604
December 2017
3,414
November 2017
3,061
October 2017
2,891
September 2017
3,296
Additional Sales Volume Data


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