2015 TT 2015 TTS Roadster 2016 TT 2017 TT RS Roadster 2017 TT RS Coupe 2017 TT TDi 2018 TT RS
Engine Location : Front
Drive Type : AWD
Production Years for Series : 2014 -
Weight : 2910 lbs | 1319.954 kg
Introduced At : 2014 Geneva Salon International de l'Auto
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2015 Audi TT Roadster

The new Audi TT Roadster and the Audi TTS Roadster

Purity in its most beautiful form: Audi is presenting the new TT Roadster* and the TTS Roadster* at the Paris Motor Show. The compact two-seater sets new standards in design, drive, and suspension. A particular highlight in the third TT generation is the Audi virtual cockpit. For the first time, the digital instrument cluster provides all information within the driver's field of vision – a concept that is causing a sensation. This has already led to the Audi TT's new display and control system receiving the Car Connectivity Award and the honor of Interior Innovation of the Year at the Automotive Interiors Expo Awards.

'The concept of designing a compact roadster following clear geometrical rules formed the original idea for the Audi TT in autumn 1994,' says Prof. Dr. Úlrich Hackenberg, Board Member for Technical Development at AÚDI AG: 'From the first generation on, it has been a sports car for the senses – a driving machine wîth an authentic design. With the new TT Roadster, we have developed this concept in a consistent manner and further improved the technical experience in the car wîth innovations such as the Audi virtual cockpit.'

A design that is full of character is fused wîth timeless aesthetics – the third-generation TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster mark the continuation of a great tradition. The Audi designers have reinterpreted the styling of this classic vehicle and complemented it wîth innovative components.

New from the ground up: the control system
The control system in the new Audi TT Roadster and TTS Roadster is fully focused on the driver. There are two variants of the new multifunction §teering wheel available. Thanks to the fundamental redevelopment of the control logic, the reworked MMI terminal features six hard buttons. The natural language control also makes it easier to operate the system when driving.

In combination wîth the MMI navigation plus, the MMI touch – the touchpad on top of the rotary push-button – is also on board. The driver can use this to scroll through lists, zoom in on maps, and enter characters. The menu structure is inspired by the layout of a smartphone and includes free text search. All key functions can be reached wîth just a few clicks, and the buttons on the side provide access to intelligently linked functions and options.

Vital Stats
Engine : 4-cylinder

Another top innovation in the new TT generation is the Audi virtual cockpit. With its versatile, detailed depictions, the digital instrument cluster replaces the analog instruments and the MMI monitor. It is possible to toggle between two levels of the 12.3-inch display. The classic view is dominated by the tachograph and the rev counter, whereas 'infotainment' mode focuses on themes such as the navigation map. The TTS Roadster features a third, particularly sporty view that focuses on the rev counter as an important racing instrument.


A further highlight of the new model generation is the voice control, which has been made significantly easier. The system now understands phrasings from everyday language, meaning that hundreds of command variations are possible for each function. In the telephone menu, for example, calling a contact is as easy as saying 'I want to talk to Peter' or 'Connect me to Peter.' The natural language control is also integrated into the navigation, radio, and media menu items, providing customers wîth consistent language control.

The fun of open top driving: the concept
The new TT Roadster combines the dynamic ride of a sports car wîth the driving experience of an open-top two-seater. The basis for this consists of struts in the underbody and body that considerably improve both the torsional rigidity and the ride comfort.

The new TT Roadster is sporty, compact and low-slung stance on the road. At 4,177 millimeters (13.7 ft), the two-seater is 21 millimeters (0.8 in) shorter than its predecessor. The wheelbase, on the other hand, has grown by 37 millimeters (1.5 in) to 2,505 millimeters (8.2 ft). The overhangs are correspondingly short. Featuring a width of 1,832 millimeters (6.0 ft), the new TT Roadster is 10 millimeters (0.4 in) narrower than its predecessor and has a height of 1,355 millimeters (4.4 ft) (3 millimeters 0.1 in less). Its drag coefficient is only 0.30 wîth the top closed – number one in the compact sports car §egmènt. This is down to Audi having combined the distinctive design wîth excellent aerodynamics.

The front of the open-top sports car conveys power and energy through its accentuated horizontal lines. Similar to the Audi R8*, the Singleframe grille is wide and flat – the four rings are positioned on the hood in the style of a high-performance sports car. On the standard version, the air inlets are connected to one another and divided by two vertical slats.

Two vertical lighting elements are also positioned in the headlights and emit the daytime running lights. Audi optionally supplies the headlights in LED technology. The headlights will also be available in the new Matrix LED technology shortly after the market launch – in this case, the high beam is produced by small, individually controlled light emitting diodes. In the Matrix LED headlights, the indicator featuring a dynamized display – another brand innovation – runs in the direction selected by the driver.

The flat and taut top of the new TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster also provides a clear contrast wîth the body and is defined by the short side window design that is typical of the TT Roadster. When viewed from the side, many of the details invoke the first generation of the design classic. The shoulders have a muscular look and the sill contour forms a strong light-refracting edge. The broad wheel arches form their own geometric entities: The front wheel arch breaks through the hood gap that continues as the tornado line all the way to the rear end. The driver no longer needs to unscrew the cap underneath the classic round tank flap on the right side. Direct refueling is performed in true racing style.

At the rear, horizontal lines again underscore the width of the open-top sports car. The bars in the standard LED rear lights, which adopt the motif of the headlights, are permanently illuminated. The third brake light – a flat strip on the edge of the luggage compartment lid – connects the light silhouette at the rear. A diffuser incorporates the tailpipes of the exhaust system. At speeds of 120 km/h (74.6 mph) and above, a spoiler is electrically extended from the luggage compartment lid to provide additional downforce on the rear axle.

Light and quiet: the convertible top
As wîth all Audi Cabriolet models, the new TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster also feature an electrically actuated fabric top. This is available as standard in black, titanium gray and jive, and fits perfectly into the design line. With parts made from magnesium, aluminum, steel and plastic, the soft top weighs just 39 kilograms (86.0 lb) and is 3 kilograms (6.6 lb) lighter than its predecessor. This has a positive impact on the gross vehicle weight and the center of gravity of the open-top two seater.

While opening, the top forms a Z shape as it folds together into a flat package. When is stowed in the aluminum tray, it does not encroach on the 280-liter (9.9 cu ft) luggage compartment. The electric drive wîth the two electric motors performs opening and closing in 10 seconds, even when driving at speeds of up to around 50 km/h (31.1 mph). As a result of the elaborate clamping technology, the closed top is completely taut even at high speeds – it features a homogeneous look that conceals the cross bows.

The acoustic top is already fitted as standard on the Audi TT Roadster and Audi TTS Roadster and is noted for its extremely good thermal insulation and a low noise level, especially in the frequency range of the airflow. The thick fleece layer on the black inner headlining adds comfort. Depending on frequency, the noise level in the interior has been reduced by up to 6 dB compared wîth the predecessor. The aerials for radio reception are hidden from view by the convertible top. An electric mesh wind deflector and the S sport seats including headroom heating are optionally available.

Intelligent composite construction: the body
The body of the TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster represents a new evolution of the Audi Space Frame (ASF) based on the modular transverse matrix (MQB). Últra-high-strength components made from hot-shaped steel reinforce the front section and the passenger compartment floor. The passenger compartment and all outer skin and attachment parts are made of the classic semi-finished aluminum products cast node, extruded profile and sheet metal.

With the 2.0 TFSI and manual transmission, the unladen weight of the TT Roadster (without driver) is only 1,320 kilograms (2,910.1 lb). The Audi engineers have also further improved the crash safety through the intelligent composite concept in the TT Roadster.

Compared wîth the Coupé, the body of the Roadster has been modified in important areas. The aluminum A-pillars each conceal a second steel pillar in their interior, which in turn houses a solid steel tube. Internal steel ribbing ensures the aluminum sills have high-strength properties. V-shaped steel struts reinforce the zones underneath the engine compartment and the luggage compartment, and connect the axle carriers.

In the TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster, a solid wall consisting of two box profiles separates the interior from the luggage compartment, and replaces the bottom cross member found on the Coupé. The upper area of this wall houses the steel roll-over bars, whose elegantly rounded form marks another classic design thémé. Mounting plates seal the openings in the rear wall, which features through-loading as standard.

Powerful and efficient: the engines
The new TT Roadster is being launched wîth two turbocharged four-cylinder engines, a TDI and a TFSI. A powerful TFSI ensures efficient drive in the TTS Roadster. With power outputs between 135 kW (184 hp) and 228 kW (310 hp), they clearly surpass the respective predecessor engines in terms of power, while significantly undercutting them wîth regard to consumption.

Úsing the modular transverse matrix, all engines are mounted in the same place – their installation location has great advantages wîth regard to packaging. A start-stop system is included as standard. In combination wîth the optional driving dynamics system Audi drive select (fitted as standard on the TTS Roadster), the adjustable engine sound makes the sound even more sonorous.

Featuring 135 kW (184 hp) and 380 Nm (280.3 lb-ft) of torque, the 2.0 TDI ultra is already a sporty engine. As wîth all engines in the new TT family, the two-liter diesel engine meets the Euro 6 standard. It averages just 4.3 liters of fuel per 100 kilometers (54.7 ÚS mpg), which equates to CO2 emissions of 114 grams of CO2 emissions per kilometer (183.5 g/mi) – a new best figure in its §egmènt.

The 2.0 TFSI produces 169 kW (230 hp) and 370 Nm (272.9 lb-ft) of torque in the TT Roadster; in the TTS Roadster, these figures are as high as 228 kW (310 hp) and 380 Nm (280.3 lb-ft). The top model breaks into the high-performance range, sprinting from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 4.9 seconds on its way to an electronically governed top speed of 250 km/h (155.3 mph). The switchable flaps in the exhaust system underscore the sporty sound.

The 2.0 TFSI channels its output to a manual six-speed transmission; the output can optionally be channeled to a six-speed S tronic. The dual-clutch transmission shifts rapidly through the gears without any noticeable break in propulsive power and can be controlled by paddles on the §teering wheel if desired. In efficiency mode in the Audi drive select system, the S tronic coasts when the driver takes their foot off the gas.

New technology: quattro permanent all-wheel drive
The quattro permanent all-wheel drive has been fully redeveloped; it is optionally available in combination wîth the 2.0 TFSI engine in the TT Roadster and is fitted as standard on the TTS Roadster. During regular driving, its electrohydraulic multi-plate clutch optimally distributes the drive torque between the front and rear axle depending on driving conditions, road characteristics and driver type.

Driving enjoyment and safety are combined at a new level by electronic clutch management. More power is routed to the rear axle during sporty driving, literally propelling the new TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster into corners. Safe, controlled drifts are possible on low-friction surfaces.

The third TT generation is the first in which the permanent all-wheel drive is integrated into the dynamic handling system Audi drive select. The driver can use this to toggle the engine characteristics and the operation of the §teering support between the comfort, auto, dynamic, efficiency and individual modes. Audi drive select also accesses a series of optional technical modules including the adaptive damper control Audi magnetic ride (fitted as standard on the TTS Roadster) and the six-speed S tronic.

A synthetic hydrocarbon oil containing microscopically small magnetic particles circulates within the damper pistons. Each of the front dampers contains 154 milliliters (6.1 in), the rear dampers 185 milliliters (7.3 in) apiece. When a voltage is applied to a coil, a magnetic field is generated in which the alignment of the particles changes so that they are perpendicular to the oil flow, thereby inhibiting its flow through the shock absorber channels.

The control unit continuously analyzes the driving properties and the condition of the road. Depending on the setting in Audi drive select, the ride of the new Audi TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster is either relatively comfortable, balanced or decidedly taut. The dynamic mode unveils its full dynamic potential. The targeted bracing of the individual wheels during fast cornering ties the Roadster tightly to the road. It largely suppresses roll and makes §teering response even more spontaneous. Audi magnetic ride reduces body pitch during braking.

Sporty and stable: the chassis
The McPherson principle is used for the front suspension of the new Audi TT Roadster and the TTS Roadster. Aluminum components reduce the weight of the unsprung masses. The §teering rack of the standard progressive §teering is designed so that the §teering ratio becomes increasingly direct when turning. The rear axle, which features four steel links per wheel, can handle the longitudinal and transverse forces separately.

Together wîth the progressive §teering, the sophisticated suspension and the taut tuning lead to high-precision dynamic handling. The body is lowered by 10 millimeters (0.4 in) on the TTS Roadster, in conjunction wîth the S line sports package and wîth Audi magnetic ride. The TT Roadster 2.0 TFSI and the TT Roadster 2.0 TDI roll on 17-inch lightweight wheels, each of which weighs only 8.7 kilograms (19.2 lb); the tire dimension is 225/50. On the TTS Roadster, the format is 18 inch and the tire size 245/40; the available options range up to 20-inch format. The newly developed tires are noted for their improved performance together wîth significant optimization of rolling resistance.

Brakes that can be precisely metered and convey a taut pedal feel are located behind the large wheels. The vented front discs have a diameter between 312 and 338 millimeters (12.3 – 13.3 in) depending on the engine version. The TTS Roadster features newly developed, particularly lightweight aluminum fixed-caliper brakes on the front axle. Another innovation, the electromechanical parking brake, takes effect at the rear wheels regardless of engine version.

The Electronic Stabilization Control (ESC), which can be switched off either partly or completely, perfectly complements the car's sporty handling. Wheel-selective torque control takes effect when cornering: Where necessary, it can distribute the drive torque from the front wheel on the inside of the curve to the front wheel on the outside of the curve (in the case of front-wheel drive). With quattro drive, this is also performed at the rear wheel. The car turns very easily into the curve thanks to the difference in propulsive forces, which is helpful for the driver. This enables more precise and neutral driving around curves, wîth the TT Roadster realizing a major boost in terms of dynamics and stability. Sports mode facilitates particularly sporty driving, facilitating §teering and control when drifting.

New line: the interior design
The two-seat interior of the new TT Roadster and the new TTS Roadster fits around the driver like a custom-made suit. It has an intimate and protective feel, particularly when the fabric top is closed, without ever being restrictive. The curb clearance is high and the newly developed sport seats wîth integrated head restraints are mounted low. Together, they weigh five kilograms less than the seats in the predecessor. The S sport seats are optionally available (standard in the TTS Roadster) and feature particularly powerful, pneumatically adjustable bolsters.

With its light, almost floating lines, the interior continues the line of the exterior. The interior's central concept is focus on the driver. All controls are grouped around the driver – a statement in favor of sporty, dynamic driving. The door trims and the center tunnel console feature flowing forms that correspond wîth one another.

When viewed from above, the sleek instrument panel resembles the wing of an airplane; the round air vents – a further traditional TT feature – are reminiscent of jet engines. They conceal the operation of the air conditioning and the optional deluxe automatic air conditioning. The high-precision air vents are an example of the high standards to which the Audi aspires wîth respect to the function, design, and workmanship of the entire interior.

High quality: color and trim
The new Audi TT offers a far more distinct and varied range of colors than its predecessor. There are 11 exterior colors, one of which is exclusively for the S line. Seven of the colors in the palette are new for the TT, and two of these are completely new for Audi: nano gray and tango red. Panther black, crystal effect and the expressive Sepang blue are also available for the TTS.

There is also a new palette of colors for the interior. There are three interior colors to choose from for both the TT and the TTS. Besides black, these are rock gray and palomino brown. For the first time, customers can choose a second color – rotor gray – in combination wîth the S line package, naturally also wîth sporty contrasting stitching. TTS buyers can also choose the sporty leather shade express red.

The equipment for the new TTS includes extended interior elements that add individually selectable color accents to the trims of the S sport seats, the sides of the center console and the rings of the air vents. Audi offers customers wîth exquisite taste numerous options for customization. Úpholstery in various grades of cloth, Alcantara and leather is available for the seats; there are also three leather packages. The S sport seats have characteristic diamond patterning on the high quality fine Nappa leather in the center panel.

The design selection admiral blue is a particular highlight, making an impression wîth matching leather colors, alternately contrasting stitching, dark aluminum, a coordinated paint finish and a special mesh floor mat.

For the TTS, Audi's design engineers have developed an innovative technical laser texture for the wings of the dashboard. This texture has a honeycomb-like, slightly raised structure that gives the TTS an unrivaled sporty appeal.

Convenient: the equipment
In Germany, sales of the new TT Roadster will begin wîth the Paris exhibition in October 2014; the TTS Roadster will follow at the start of 2015. The basic price of the 2.0 TFSI is €37,900. The generous standard equipment, which includes xenon plus headlights, air conditioning, and the MMI radio, can be expanded wîth numerous pieces of sporty, practical, and convenient optional equipment.

The optional driver assistance systems are also cutting edge. The Audi side assist included as standard in the 2.0 TFSI and TTS ensures safe lane changes wîth a radar measurement towards the rear, and the Audi active lane assist keeps the open top two seater in its lane wîth minor §teering interventions. The park assist wîth display of surroundings automatically controls the car into and out of parking spaces. Traffic sign recognition is another optional system; attention assist is provided as standard.

Topping the modular infotainment program is MMI navigation plus wîth MMI touch. It already uses the second generation modular infotainment program wîth the Tegra 30 graphics processor from Audi's partner Nvidia. It goes without saying that the Audi TT features the high speed communication standard LTE (Long Term Evolution) on board. The supplementary module Audi connect additionally features the familiar tailored online services – from Google Earth and Google Street View through to Twitter and Facebook access. Another new feature is online media streaming. The MMI connect app enables access to services such as Aupeo! and Napster.

With the Audi phone box, the cell phone can be conveniently docked in the car and the seat belt microphone ensures excellent voice quality during calls even when the convertible top is open. The optional Bang & Olufsen sound system provides 680 watts of power and features 12 loudspeakers. The specially designed frames for the woofers are adorned wîth anodized aluminum elements bearing the logo of the Danish hi-fi specialists. A white LED light conductor makes the sound system a highlight even at night.

Fuel consumption of the models named above:
Audi TT Roadster 2.0 TDI ultra (135 kW):

Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 4.5 – 4.3 (52.3 – 54.7 ÚS mpg)**;
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 118 – 114 (189.9 – 183.5 g/mi)**

Audi TT Roadster 2.0 TFSI (169 kW):
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 6.1 – 6.0 (38.6 – 39.2 ÚS mpg)**;
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 142 – 140 (228.5 – 225.3 g/mi)**

Audi TT Roadster 2.0 TFSI S tronic (169 kW):
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 6.8 – 6.7 (34.6 – 35.1 ÚS mpg)**;
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 156 – 154 (251.1 – 247.8 g/mi)**

Audi TTS Roadster 2.0 TFSI quattro (228 kW):
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 7.5 – 7.3(31.4 – 32.2 ÚS mpg)**;
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 174 – 169 (280.0 – 272.0 g/mi)**

Audi TTS Roadster 2.0 TFSI quattro S tronic
(228 kW):
Combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 7.1 – 6.9 (33.1 – 34.1 ÚS mpg)**;
Combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 166 – 159 (267.2 – 255.9 g/mi)**

Source - Audi
As the 20th Century neared its end, it appeared as if car design, too, was taking its final gasps. The automobile was being replaced by a device more akin to a rolling computer than an instrument of freedom. Romance was being drained from the automotive scene as cars like the Toyota Prius became more fashionable than performance cars and isolated SUVs towered above the fine-handling sedans and wagons that seemed to have fallen out of public favor.

The problem was obvious: technology, safety features, and environmental concerns were reshaping the priorities of the automobile, and no manufacturer could figure out how to work those ingredients into the recipe for a truly exciting car. The problem was obvious, but the solution was not.

One manufacturer would come through, though, with a car that satisfied the evolving automotive zeitgeist even as it appealed to the more traditionally stimulating automotive values of beauty and driving excitement. That manufacturer was Audi, and the car was the TT.

By the late 1990s, Audi had established a remarkably strong brand identity considering the difficulties faced by the company just a decade prior. When Audi was charting out new territory in the 1980s through its pioneering developments in all-wheel-drive technology and aerodynamics, the company made sure to not lock itself into a strict brand image as had the other mainstream German automakers. Volkswagen produced cars for the masses, BMW produced cars for the driving enthusiast, and Mercedes-Benz produced cars for those who preferred (and could afford) supreme comfort and solidity.

Audi, conversely, did not adopt strictly static elements, such as sportiness or luxuriousness, as it defined its products in the 1980s. Audi instead developed a dynamic formula for creating cars that could be sporty, luxurious, and even fashionable through their remarkable ability to embrace technology and apply the ever-changing ideas of auto design to an innovative and capable product.

So while BMW tried to make their cars quick and Mercedes-Benz tried to make their cars comfortable, Audi tried only to produce a better car by riding the crests of technological waves. This strategy, after years of application, created the clear brand image that Audi has today. The 1980s saw Audi develop one of the most radically aerodynamic sedans of its time, as well as the successful use of all-wheel-drive as a means of improving handling in all weather conditions.

It followed naturally, then, that Audi should be one of the first automakers to successfully create a new type of car for the new millennium—a car that applied modern ideas, including the technology responsible for creating some of the most uninspiring and over-processed automobiles that the world had ever known, to an exciting and innovative package.

When the Audi TT was introduced in 1998 for the 1999 model year, it was an absolute sensation. Everything about it spoke to a new generation of automotive design. Though the TT would eventually be offered with a six-cylinder power plant, it was initially offered only with a turbocharged four-cylinder—a brave step for a car aimed at six-cylindered rivals from Porsche and BMW. The TT was available with front-wheel-drive, or with 'quattro' all-wheel-drive, both of which offered better foul-weather traction than rear-wheel-driven competitors.

The real audacity of the TT did not come from its small-displacement engine or its odd choice of drive wheels, though, but from its radical appearance dictated by J Mays and Freeman Thomas. With its Bauhaus-inspired design language, replete with perfectly sculpted fender flares and a bold roofline, the TT's design was bristling with the ideas of a new automotive age. The look was remarkably solid, an effect accentuated on silver TTs, which appeared to have been milled from a single block of billet aluminum.

The interior, too, was revolutionary. The extensive use of real aluminum to accent high-quality black plastics and leather was a trend-setting idea that, over a decade later, still looks modern and exciting. Martin Smith is credited with the TT's interior design, and his careful work created a cockpit that exuded the same brilliant sense of modernity and style as the car's outer skin.

The TT was beautiful, and it was also exciting to drive—although some of that excitement was unwanted. The Audi TT was based upon the same platform that underpinned the Volkswagen Golf, and should never have been considered a true sports car. Its price, power levels, and stunning looks, though, meant that some of its competitors were thoroughbred sporting machines like the Porsche Boxster. This led to unfavorable handling characteristics, where the TT showed that its racetrack capabilities were not in line with its striking appearance. Unpredictable oversteer prevented the TT from realizing any sporting aspirations it may have had, though it is likely that Audi always intended for the car to be more of a stylistic sensation than an accomplished track tool.

Any handling issues that the Audi TT had at its limits of adhesion were forgotten entirely in around-town driving, where the TT cosseted its pilot with the comfort, security, and unique style of a thoroughly modern vehicle.

A Roadster version of the TT, replacing the Coupe's pretty roofline and useless rear seat with a folding soft top and a polished pair of roll-over hoops, was offered after the first year of TT production. The Roadster was a sensible addition and a successful seller, adding the option of open-air motoring to the supremely stylish TT lineup.

The Audi TT was one of the first cars to embrace the technology of the new millennium in a unique and exciting manner. It may have relied heavily upon its looks to garner attention, but its bold appearance was as innovative and fresh as any other part of the car. The Audi TT proved that excitement can exist even in a modern automotive climate that is often at odds with the traditional elements of vehicular fun—and that's quite an achievement for a company that, just a few decades ago, was an unfamiliar name to most Americans.

Sources:

'Audi TT.' CarAutoPortal.com n. pag. Web. 28 Jun 2010. http://www.carautoportal.com/audi/audi-tt.php.

Enright, Andy. 'Audi TT (1999-2006).' Yahoo Cars 04 Oct 2006: n. pag. Web. 28 Jun 2010. http://uk.cars.yahoo.com/car-reviews/car-and-driving/audi-tt-2004432.html.

'Model Guide: TT Coupe/Roadster.' AudiWorld.com n. pag. Web. 28 Jun 2010. http://www.audiworld.com/model/.

By Evan Acuña
A two-door compact sports car, the Audi TT was manufactured by Audi Hungaria Motor Kft. in Gyor, Hungary since 1998 for the German automaker and Volkswagen Group subsidiary AUDI A.G. Today the TT is now in its second generation, and both generations have been available in two car body styles; as a 2+2 Coupe or two-seater Roadster. Both versions have been built on consecutive generations of the Volkswagen Group A platform beginning with the A4. Due to the platform-sharing, the TT has identical powertrain and suspension layouts as its related platform-mates; which includes a front-mounted transversely orientated engine, front-wheel drive or Haldex Traction-based Quattro on-demand four-wheel drive system, and fully independent front suspension using MacPherson struts.

In the spring of 1994 at the Volkswagen Group Design Center in California the styling of the Audi TT began. The TT was originally unveiled as a concept car at the 1995 Frankfurt Motor Show. J Mays and Freeman Thomas were credited for the design, along with Martin Smith and Romulus Rost who contributed to the award-winning interior design. The TT takes its name from the successful motor racing tradition of NSU in the British Isle of Man TT motorcycle race. In 1911 NSU began competing in the TT, and eventually merged into the company now known as Audi. The Audi TT follows the NUS 1000TT, 1200TT and TTS cars of the 1960s in taking their names from the race.

Enabling seamless design features on the first-generation TT was a previously unused laser beam welding adaptation, but which actually delayed its introduction. In the beginning Audi didn t offer any type of automatic transmission option for TT. From 2003 though a dual clutch six-speed Direct-Shift Gearbox became available, with the U.K. TT variants becoming the world s first user of a dual clutch transmission configured for a right-hand drive car. Though the major world first for a road car equipped with a dual clutch transmission was claimed earlier by a Volkswagen Group platform-mate; the left hand drive Volkswagen Golf Mk4 R32.

With an internal designation Typ 8N, the production model was introduced as a Coupe in September of 1998, followed closely by a roadster in August of 1999. The production model was based on the Volkswagen Group A4 platform as used for the Volkswagen Golf Mk4, the original Audi A3, the Skoda Octavia and others. Compared to the concept the production model was styled only a little different from the concept, except for the slightly re-profiled bumpers, and the addition of a rear quarterlight windows behind the doors. In October of 1998 the factory production commenced.

After a series of high-speed accidents in Europe, early TT models gained press coverage. During abrupt lane changes or sharp turns crashes were reported along with related fatalities that occurred at speeds in excess of 110 mph. Late in 1999 and early in 2000, both the coupe and roadster models were recalled to improve predictability of the car s handling at extreme high-speeds. Newly added were Audi s Electronic Stability Programme, and rear spoiler, along with suspension modifications. All of the changes and updates were subsequently incorporated into future series production version of the vehicle. In June of 2006 factory production of this generation ended.

Sharing an identical powertrain layout as its related Volkswagen Group platform-mates mechanically, the TT utilizes a transversely mounted internal combustion engine, with either front-wheel drive, or quattro on-demand four-wheel drive. Initially it was available with a 1.8 liter inline four-cylinder 20-valve turbocharged engine in two states of DIN-rated power outputs; 178 hp and 222 hp. All of these engine share the identical fundamental design, however the 166 kW version features a larger K04 turbocharger, an additional intercooler on the right side, forged connecting rods, a dual tailpipe exhaust and several other internals; which were designed to accommodate the increase in turbo boost; from around 10 lbs per square inch to 15 lbs per square inch. Branded as Quattro ; Haldex Traction enabled four wheel drive which was optional on the 180 engine, and was standard on the more powerful 225 version.

In early 2003 the original four cylinder engine range was integrated with a 184 kilowatts 3.2 liter VR6 engine, which came standard with the Quattro four-wheel drive system. The following July, a new six-speed dual clutch transmission called the Direct-Shift Gearbox which improved acceleration through much reduced shift times, was available, along with a stiffer suspension.

In 2005, Audi unveiled the Coupe-only limited edition Audi TT Quattro Sport. The Quattro sport was built by Audi A.G. high performance specialist subsidiary Quattro GmbH and it featured increased power from its 1.8 liter turbocharged engine rising to 27 hp and 236 lb ft of torque. It also was reduced in weight by 165 lbs which allowed it to reach 0 to 62.1 mph in just 5.9 seconds and it had a top speed of 155.3 mph. Audi achieved this weight lot by deleting the spare wheel, the removal of the rear parcel shelf and rear seats along with deleting the standard fitment air conditioning. On the inside, the Quattro sport featured lightweight fixed-back Recaro bucket seats. You could tell the Quattro Sport from the other TT Coupes by its two-tone paint scheme and the exclusive 18 15-spoe cast aluminum alloy wheels, plus the identical body kit fitted to the TT 3.2 V6, up-rated suspension settings, black exhaust tailpipes, V6-spec brakes with red-painted calipers up front and new wheels that were wider at the rear which greatly improved handling.

The first generation TT has undergone two U.S. class action lawsuits affective specific models. In 2007, Pearson, Soter, Simon, Warshaw and Penny at LLP and the Law Office of Robert L. Starr filed a class action lawsuit against Volkswagen Group of America claimed that the timing belts for model year 1999-2003 Audi and Volkswagen cars equipped with a 1.8 liter turbocharged engine fail prematurely. The vehicles included in the suit are the Audi TT, Audi A4 and the Volkswagen Passet. The plain claims that the timing belts fail prior to the service interval, as stated in the owner s manual. In May of 2008 the parties had reached a class-wide settlement and preliminary approval of the settlement was granted by the court. Another lawsuit entered May of 2008 alleged that the instrument clusters on 2000-2005 model year Audi TTs were defective.

For 2000, the original generation Audi TT was nominated for the North American Car of the Year award. For 2000 and 2001 it was also on Car and Driver magazine s Ten Best list.

In 2005, a sneak-peak of the second-generation TT was revealed in the form of the Audi Shooting Brake concept car at the Tokyo Motor Show in 2005. The concept featured angular styling, and a shooting brake two-door hatchback body style, and was an insight into the new TT design. On April 6, 2006 Audi unveiled the second-generation TT; internal designation Typ 8J. Constructed on the Volkswagen Group A5 platform, the 2nd generation TT utilized aluminum in the front body panels and steel in the rear which enhanced its near-neutral front-to-rear weight distribution. This vehicle was available in front-wheel drive or quattro four-wheel drive layout and it was available once again as a 2+2 Coupe and as a two-seater Roadster. In comparison to the previous generation, this newest generation is five inches longer and three inches wider. In August of 2006 factory production began.

In the beginning the powertrain options only included petrol engines, which consist of either one of two inline four cylinder engines; the all-new 1.8 liter EA888 Turbocharged Fuel Stratified Injection or the more common and established EA113-variant 2.0 liter TFSI. Derived from the Audi Le Mans endurance race cars, the Fuel Stratified Injection and offers advanced power output and cleaner emissions. Brought over from the previous year the 3.2 liter V6 badged VR6 engine was also available in the Canadian model. In the 2009 model year the 2.0 TSFI Quattro models with the latest EA888 engine.

Standard on this generation was a six-speed manual transmission with the six-speed Direct-Shift Gearbox as optional for all but 1.8 liter engine. Standard on V6 models was Quattro on-demand four-wheel drive, once again using the Haldex Traction clutch, but not available on 1.8 TFSI. The new 8J TT now featured a multi-link fully independent rear suspension which complimented the front independent suspension, much like all its PQ35 platform buddies. Audi Magnetic Ride was Audis new active suspension which enhanced the entire suspension system and was available as an option. This extra feature was based on Delphi s MagneRide, a suspension which utilized magneto rheological dampers. Also new on this TT was an updated rear spoiler that automatically extends at speeds greater than 75 mph and retracts again below 50 mph. This spoiler can be manually controlled by the driver through a switch on the dash.

Debuted at the 2008 Geneva Motor Show, the 2.0 TDI Quattro is the first diesel engined version of the Audi TT in the European market. As the name implies, it is only available with Quattro, and is available in Coupe and Roadster version. Power came from the new 2.0 liter Turbocharged Direct Injection engine, now with 16 valves, double overhead camshaft, 1,800-bar common rail fuel delivery and eight-hole piezo fuel injections that produces a DIN-rated output of 168 bhp at 4,200 revolutions per minute and torque of 258 lb/ft at 1,750 to 2,500 rpm. This model also includes a six-speed manual transmission.

Acceleration was rated from 0 to 62.1mph on the Coupe in just 7.5 seconds and could reach a top speed of 140.4 mph. The Roadster was slightly less aerodynamic and reached 0 to 62.1 mph in 7.7 seconds and had a top speed of 138 mph. Audi claims that the average fuel consumption for the Cope variant with the 2.0 TDI engine is 5.3 liters which achieves a CO2 emissions rating of 139 gram. The Roadster TDI achieves an average of 51.4 mph and CO2 of 144 gram.

Audi released the first Audi S model of the TT range at the 2008 North American International Auto Show in Detroit with a heavily revised 2.0 TFSI engine. The cylinder block, fuel injectors and cylinder head were all modified from the base 2.0 TFSI engine. Along with additional modifications, this engine produces a DIN-rated motive power output of 268 bhp and generates a torque turning force of 258 lb ft of torque from 2,500 to 5,000 rpm. The S was available with a choice of either a six-speed close-ratio manual transmission or a six-speed S tronic transmission. The S tronic gearbox was the only available transmission in the United States and it was only available with Quattro four-wheel drive as standard.

The suspension in the S was lowed by 0.4 inches in comparison to the standard models and included Audi Magnetic Ride as standard and a all-new two-stage sports-biased Electronic Stability Programme . Clamped by a single-piston gloss black caliper which was embellished with a bold TTS logo was the radially ventilated front disc brakes and a lap time that was prominently displayed in the center of the instrument cluster. Standard on the S were 9Jx18 5-parallel-spoke design alloy roadwheels with 245/40 ZR18 high performance tires. 19 5-spoke star wheels and tires were optional on this vehicle. Compared to the standard model the exterior featured some updates with a TTS body styling with a newly redesigned front, redesigned rear bumper, side sill extensions, four exhaust tailpipes and larger air intakes. The TTS s Coupe performance was recorded at 0-62.1mph in just 5.4 seconds, with the Roadster just two-tenths slower at 5.6 seconds. The top speed is electronically limited to 155mph.At the 2008 Isle of Man TT motorcycle races Audi offered 8 TTS cars for official use.

At the 2008 W rthersee Tour at P rtschach am W rthersee in Austria Audi debuted a new show car variant of the second generation Audi TT; the TT Clubsport Quattro. It was shown only in an open-topped speedster variant, and its 2.0 TFSI engine was tuned to give 296 bhp. The soft top from the standard TT Roadster disappeared and was replaced with two humps , along with two substantial roll bars. The Clubsport Quattro featured LED daytime running lamps, black-painted single frame grill , an aggressive body kit with large frontal air intakes and a lower spoiler lip. The axle trip was widened 2.6 inches with bolder and wider wheel arch extensions, wider side sills, polished 19-inch alloys and 255-section tires, and the rear were twin polished stainless steel oval tailpipes next to a new rear diffuser.

On the inside the Clubsport Quattro featured racing bucket seats, a six-speak S tronic dual-clutch transmission with Quattro four-wheel drive, TTS spec brakes and lightweight aluminum detail throughout the interior. Though Audi has not ruled out the possibility of a small scale production, it was primarily a show car .
Debuted at the 2009 Geneva Auto Show, Audi released the first ever compact sports car Audi RS model; the new Audi TT RS which was available from 2009 in Coupe and Roadster variants. Developed by Audi s high performance subsidiary Quattro GmbH at Neckarsulm, the new TT RS harks back to the sporting legacy of 1980s Audi Quattros with their high performance five-cylinder turbocharged engines. The TT RS included an all-new 2.5 liter inline five-cylinder Turbocharged Fuel Stratified Injection petrol engine which produced a DIN-rated motive power output of 335 bhp from 5,4000 to 6,700 rpm and a torque of 450 newton meters at 1,600-5,300 rpm.

The Audi RS2 Avant and all Audi RS models afterwards were assembled at the Quattro GmbH factory in Neckarsulm, Germany. The TT RS however will be the first Audi RS vehicle not assembled in Germany, instead it was completely assembled in the Audi factory in Gy r, Hungary alongside its lesser Audi TT mates.

Featuring a new short-shift close-ratio six-speed manual transmission the TT RS is only available with Audi s trademark Quattro four-wheel drive system, like all RS models. The TT RS utilized a specially adapted version of the latest generation multi-plate clutch from Haldex Traction. The Quattro system included addition like a constant velocity joint before the cardan propeller shaft and a compact rear-axle differential that was up-rated to cope with the increased torque from the five cylinder turbo engine. The TT RS featured a 0.4 inch lower ride height like the TTS and featured optional Audi Magnetic Ride and rides on a standard 18 inch road wheels with 245/45 ZR18 tires. The front discs on the TT RS are clamped by gloss black painted four-piston calipers which featured the RS logo and the braes were up-rated to include two-piece cross-drilled and radially vented front discs sized at 14.6 inches in diameter. The rear ventilated discs were 12.2 inches in diameter.

The Audi TT RS also featured a fixed rear spoiler with a retractable being an option. The interior was black with heated Alcantara/leathe sports seats with Silk Nappy and Fine Napppa leather as an option. Also available as an option were Recaro RS bucket seats that first appeared in the Audi B7 RS4. The Sport button which sharpened the throttle response and deepened the exhaust note was carried over from the B7 RS4 along with a three-stage user-selectable Electronic Stability Programme.

In March 2009 the TT RS went on sale and delivery began in the summer. The vehicle had a top speed of 155.3 mph and could achieve 0-62.1 mph in just 4.6 seconds, and 4.7 seconds for the roadster. A factory option de-restricted the top speed to 174.0 mph. The Coupe has a kerb weight of 3.197 lbs and the Roadster weighed 3,329 lbs.

The recipient of numerous awards, the second generation TT won the inaugural Drive Car of the Year, Top Gear Coupe of the Year in 2006, Fifth Gear Car of the Year in 2006, World Design Car of the Year 2007, Autobild Most Beautiful Car and being a finalist for World Car of the Year.

By Jessica Donaldson
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Vehicle information, history, and specifications from concept to production.

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