Image credits: © Chevrolet. GM Corp

1969 Chevrolet Camaro news, pictures, specifications, and information
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
The Z/28 Camaro was designed to race from the beginning, and delivered in limited numbers to the public with a Special High Performance 302 cubic-inch engine. The Z/28 package in conjunction with suspension improvements fit within the context of SCCA Trans-Am series. In 1969, the Penske Team won 8 out of 12 races in the highly competitive Group 2 of the series. A pivotal race in the season occurred August 24, 1969 at Laguna Seca. Mark Donohue driving the #6 Z/28 Camaro won his fourth race in a row and cemented his legacy with the z/28, going on to win the 1969 Manufacturer's Title. This car was purchased new for road racing purposes. It has been completely restored by the current owner. This Z/28 illustrates the basis with which Penske and others set to work with to succeed at Laguna Seca.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N608879
 
Sold for $451,000 at 2012 Barrett-Jackson.
In 1968 Fred Gibb Chevrolet of LaHarpe, Illinois, persuaded General Motors to produce the Camaro with the all-aluminum LZ-1 engine. The engine had been designed for the CanAm racing series. General Motors agreed as long as Gibb was able to order at least 50 cars with this option. In December, the first two Zl-1 Camaro's arrived at the Illinois dealership. This option would become known as the COPO option or Central Office Production Order (COPO). It would include a massive 427 cubic-inch engine in a small, compact, and lightweight Camaro, Chevelle, or Nova.

At a sticker price of $7200, the COPO Camaro was almost double the price of a 'standard' COPO Camaro with a cast-iron 427. As a result, Gibb returned most of the cars to the factory as most Chevrolet enthusiasts were not willing to pay this amount. The cars were then sent to other dealerships. In total there were 69 examples produced including the original 50 examples shipped to Gibb in 1968 and another 19 produced in 1969. Gibb was able to sell 13 of the original 50.

The 1969 Chevrolet Camaro ZL-1 427 Coupe finished in Cortez Silver paint was offered for sale at the 2006 Worldwide Group Auction held on Hilton Head Island. It is COPO Code 9560 order and one of the 13 cars sold by Fred Gibb Chevrolet. It's first owner was Tom Rose of Warren, Ohio who kept the car six months before selling it to Dick Harrell, also known as 'Mr. Chevrolet'. The engine was removed from the car and used in racing endeavors. At Bristol the original engine was destroyed in Dick's 1970 Pro Stock Camaro. Later, a replacement aluminum block engine was re-installed back into the Camaro and has since been re-certified by Ed Cunneen, president of the COPO Connection.

This car is equipped with disc brakes, M40 Turbo Hydramatic transmission, black interior, heavy duty radiator, electronic ignition, heavy duty suspension with 12 bolt rear with 4.10 gears, dual exhaust and cowl induction hood.

At the conclusion of the auction, this ultimate muscle car was left unsold.

By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2006
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379L508806
 
Sold for $77,000 at 2008 RM Auctions.
The 1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS L78 396 Turbo Jet Coupe finished in Fantom Green with a white interior was offered for sale at the 2006 Worldwide Group Auction held on Hilton Head Island. It was expected to sell between $110,000-$130,000. It has undergone a restoration since new and retinas the original sheet metal and numbers matching engine. The L78 375 horsepower engine is mated to a M21 close-ratio four-speed transmission with the optional 4.11 posi-traction rear axle. In the front is a black-finished grille. The vehicle has simulated rear fender louvers and 'SS' emblems.

The success with the Camaro in SCCA Trans-Am racing inspired many enthusiasts to by the race-inspired Z/28 option package. In total, over 20,000 were sold. The Regular Production Order L78 option cost an additional $316 and just over 4,000 buyers purchased this option. The L78 '396 Turbo Jet' featured a Holley four-barrel carburetor and a high rise aluminum intake manifold which replaced the Rochester unit. The engine was rated at 375 horsepower and 415 foot-pounds of torque.

At the conclusion of the auction, the vehicle was left unsold.

By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2006
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N607652
 
Sold for $82,500 at 2007 RM Auctions.
This 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Coupe was offered for sale at the 2007 RM Auctions held in Amelia Island, Florida. It was offered without reserve and estimated to sell between $80,000 - $100,000. It is powered by a 302 cubic-inch V8 engine capable of producing 290 horsepower. There is a Muncie four-speed manual gearbox with front disc and rear drum brakes. The car is finished in LeMans blue with ivory bucket seats and black carpets. It has been treated to a restoration and is in excellent condition. It has correct chambered dual exhaust, 3.73:1 BU posi-traction, 12-bolt rear end, and correct Holley DZ 4053 carburetor.

At auction, the car was sold, selling for $82,500.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2007
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
This 1969 Chevrolet Camaro was purchased with the Rally Sport Z28 option in Coupe configuration. It is finished in yellow paint with black racing stripes.

It is seen here at the 2007 Eastern Concours of the United States.

By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2007
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
Engine Designed for the Trans Am Racing Series
Chevrolet introduced the Camaro in the fall of 1966 as a competitor to the Mustang, which had a 2.5-year head start. Previously, Chevrolet felt the Corvair would be the little runabout that would satisfy the need for a Mustang competitor, but they were proven wrong. The Camaro, like the Mustang, could be all things to all people.

The 1967 Camaro with the optional 302 engine (RPO Z28) was built to certify the engine for Trans Am racing. Visually, it could be identified by the two band-aid stripes along the top of the car. In its first year, only 602 people ordered this subtle package, but by 1968, over 7,000 people ordered one. In mid-year 1968, Chevrolet started to replace the 302 badges with Z/28 badges, proof that 'Z/28 performance package' had a certain ring to enthusiasts.

For 1969, Chevrolet sold over 20,000 Z/28's. It is also the most popular version of the car today. The Z/28 shown, owned by the same owner since 1985, is the desirable LeMans Blue with white stripes. It is equipped with the Rally Sport package, which most notably included hidden headlights. It also has the standard black interior, but it is optioned out with AM/FM radio, cowl induction hood, and rosewood steering wheel. It stickered for $4,146.60 when new.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N594557
 
Sold for $85,250 at 2007 RM Auctions.
Sold for $121,000 at 2009 Gooding & Company.
High bid of $74,000 at 2011 Gooding & Company. (did not sell)
This 1969 Chevrolet Z-28 Camaro 'FIA' Racing Car is fitted with a 305 cubic-inch V8 engine that produces just over 400 horsepower. There is a four-speed manual gearbox, Moser 12-bolt rear end, and four-wheel disc brakes.

The Trans Am Series made famous racing greats, which made it a competitive racing series and one that was difficult for the average 'Joe' to compete with considerable amounts of success. In 1970, four Miami Region SCCA enthusiasts teamed up to battle these racing greats. The four individuals were auto parts salesman John Maynard, mechanic Pete Flanagan, office machine technician Ed O'Conner, and John Oliver who owned a 1969 Z28 Camaro.

Converting the Camaro into a FIA Group 4 racer took nearly a year and considerable amounts of financial resources. The car was given the required safety requirements, all of its street equipment removed, the engine tuned, a heavy duty suspension fitted, braking system improved, and various other necessary improvements.

The car was entered in the 24 Hours of Daytona where it qualified well and soon earned itself international fame. The fame was not intentional, as it was involved in the first crash of the race. A major media publication published the caption 'FIRST CRASH – A contact incident came early in the 24 Hours of Daytona when the No. 3 Martini & Rossi Porsche spun in the path of the Oliver/Maynard/Dobkin Camaro in Turn Two of the 3.81 mile circuit. Both cars continued but the Porsche had to stop for suspension repairs'. Twenty-three hours later, the S-CAR-GO was listed as 'not running' due to mechanical failure and listed as a mid-pack finisher.

The car was repaired, painted in black, riding on new magnesium racing wheels, and wearing the number 88. It was entered in the 12 Hours of Sebring and ran well for the first six hours of the race. It was running near the leaders in the Touring Class when the Franklin rear end disintegrated and forced a premature retirement. They had completed 131 laps and were given 35th overall, which was good enough to beat out Mario Andretti, Jackie Ickx, Sam Posey and Masten Gregory.

The Z-28 Camaro would return to regional SCCA competition as the cost of racing in the national spotlight was too much. The car was later sold to Roberto 'Cowboy' Gonzales who used it in Mexico in nearby SCCA 'A' Sedan events. The current owner purchased the car in 1999 and treated it to a thorough and authentic restoration back to its Daytona race livery and mechanical configuration. It was brought to the 2007 Monterey Sports & Classic Car Auction presented by RM Auctions, where it had an estimated value of $85,000 - $125,000. It was offered without reserve. As the gavel fell, the lot had been sold for $85,250 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2007
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
This vehicle is a 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Sunoco Penske Trans-Am Race Car that is fitted with a 500M Donovan aluminum block V8 engine capable of producing 700 horsepower. There is a Jerico four-speed transmission, an independent competition suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes.

In 1969, the Sunoco-sponsored Roger Penske Camaro was driven by the legendary Mark Donohue and had a fantastic season winning eighteen out of twenty-five races.

This vehicle is a tribute, built to the same specifications as the original and created using the same techniques such as forming the body panels on an English wheel. It is finished in the authentic Sunoco/Penske racing blue with a black vinyl top and bright yellow racing wheels.

It was brought to the 2007 Monterey Sports & Classic Car Auction presented by RM Auctions, where it had an estimated value of $100,000-$150,000. It was offered without reserve and sold for $71,500 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2007
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
Of the 201 Yenko Camaros produced in 1969, there were only 37 painted Hugger Orange. Of that 37, only nine had the combination of a four-speed transmission with a black vinyl top. This car is fully documented and listed on the official VIN list maintained by Supercar Registry.

This car was sold directly by the Yenko Chevrolet dealership in Canonsburg, PA.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N554308
Engine Num: T2219MN
 
Sold for $80,000 at 2007 Bonhams.
Sold for $32,450 at 2011 Russo & Steele.
Chevrolet's COPO system allowed performance enthusiasts to create some of the most exciting, fast, and outrageous cars in Chevy history. Only a few were built which has brought about much demand in modern times, and what has been termed 'tributes', 'replicas' and 'clones.' The COPO cars were 'sleeper cars' - they had no distinguishable exterior markings to separate them from an original Camaro. This car has a raised hood which indicates there may be something massive lurking underneath. In reality, there is a monster: a 427 cubic-inch engine with 425 horsepower at its disposal. There is a four-speed manual transmission and the correct 3963512 casting number on its block. (Which means it is believed to have been an original). This is a radio delete car with power front discs and power steering. On all four corners are plain steel wheels with dog dish hubcaps and Goodyear Polyglas F70-14 tires.

In 2007 this Two-door hardtop was brought to Bonhams auction, An Important Sale of Collectors' Motorcars and Automobilia, at the Quail Lodge Resort & Golf Club in Carmel, California. It was offered without reserve and sold for $80,000 plus premium and taxes.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2008
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N657861
Engine Num: T0513MN
 
Sold for $175,000 at 2007 Bonhams.
Sold for $159,500 at 2010 Gooding & Company.
The first owner of this Norwood, Ohio built Camaro was Mr. Willard Clements in Toronto, Ontario. GM of the US did not keep records of the COPO (Central Office Production Order) cars so finding and proving a Camaro to be an original is very difficult, and near impossible. GM of Canada, however, kept very good records and documentation. Meaning, this car is known to be a Chevy built COPO 9561 Camaro with the 427 cubic-inch, 425 horsepower big-block V8 engine.

The COPO program was intended for fleet orders, such as for police cars, low-powered strippers for meter readers, and fleets of taxi-cabs. They were non-standard cars with Regular Production Order parts. A few dealers used the COPO order system rather differently than for mere fleet cars - they saw an opportunity to offer high-performance machines to their customers.

The most common was the COPO 9561 which had the 427 cubic-inch, Mark IV, big-block, V8 engine. The biggest RPO engine was the L89 396/375 HP aluminum head big block. It is estimated that only 822 examples were built with 40speeds plus another 193 with automatics.

The COPO 9561 also included the ZL2 cowl induction hood, L78 cowl induction air cleaner, heavy duty springs, 12-bolt Positraction rear axle with 4.1:1 gears, heavy duty radiator, and no external markings.

This car has the M21 close ratio four-speed gearbox, power disc brakes, radio, heater, and plain steel wheels with dog dish hubcaps. It is painted in Olympic Gold with Dark Green vinyl interior.

Clements, the original owner of this car, immediately bored out the engine by .030 to maximize the displacement. He used it as a drag racer and ran in the high 11s at Indianapolis. When he sold it in 1978, the car had traveled a mere 16,000 miles. The second owner was Barry Allen who removed the original engine and replaced it with a 427 crate motor. In 1982 he restored it and later sold it, with the crate engine installed and the original engine still boxed, to the third owner, Tony Begley of Northern Illinois Classic Auto Brokers in 1999. They quickly resold it to Steve Stange.

The current owner purchased the car in July of 2000 and performed mild restoration, detailing, and mechanical work.

In 2007 this Two-door hardtop was brought to Bonhams auction where it sold for $175,000 plus premium and taxes. There was another 427 Camaro of the same year, but it was not confirmed to be an original and it sold for around half the price of this car. Both were in great condition, the only differences being this one could be verified as an original COPO.

In 2010, this car was offered for sale at Gooding & Company's Scottsdale Auction in Arizona. It was estimated to sell for $125,000 - $200,000. The lot was sold for the sum of $159,500, inclusive of buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2010
Convertible
 
This 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Pace Car has been treated to a complete 'frame off' restoration near the close of the 1990s. It is equipped with a 350 V8 engine that produces 300 horsepower, an automatic gearbox, and air conditioning. It has an AM-FM radio, wood wheel, power windows, chambered exhaust, deluxe interior, power disc brakes, console, fold down rear seat, title, enduro bumper, power steering, tach and gauges, front and rear spoilers, and tined glass.
By Daniel Vaughan | May 2008
Convertible
 
This 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Super Sport Convertible has been treated to a complete 'frame off' restoration near the close of the 1990s. It is equipped with a 350 V8 engine that produces 300 horsepower, a turbo 350 automatic gearbox, and power disc brakes.
By Daniel Vaughan | May 2008
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
2 Fast 2 Furious

This 1969 Chevy Camaro Yenko was driven by Paul Walker in the movie '2 Fast 2 Furious.' The Yenko Camaro and Hemi Challenger were chosen to be in the movie because they were considered Detroit's finest muscle cars. They were used to attract the baby boomer generation.

By Daniel Vaughan | May 2008
Convertible
 
The Chevrolet Camaro was used to pace the Memorial Day Classic on May 30th 1969. This was the second time in 3 years that Indianapolis Motor Speedway chose the Camaro to pace the race. It was the first and only time a single model has had such an honor. The car was driven by the 1960 race winner Jim Rathmann. 1969 was also the year Mario Andretti won the race. The pace car was obtained with the ordering option Z11. This Z11 is one of the replicas available to the retail public. In addition to the standard Rally Sport and Super Sport options, this pace car is equipped with a 4-speed transmission coupled to a 300 horsepower, 350 cubic-inch V8 engine. Options available were power steering, power front disc brakes, A/C, AM-FM radio, and console gauges.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
When the Camaro was introduced in 1967, the Super Sport version was available only with an exclusive-to-the-Camaro 350 V8. Chevrolet soon offered its larger 396 in the Camaro to do battle with the new 390 Mustang.

A 427 was in the Chevy engine roster and could be ordered in the big Biscayne/Bel Air/Impala/Caprice and the Corvette. Bug GM's edict banning sponsorship of racing, as well as a policy limiting the hp/weight ratio for all cars except Corvettes, prevented the 427's installation in the Camaro. However, by 1969, fierce competition was slighting Chevy's reputation and sales. What to do? Enter the COPO System!

The Central Office Production Order system permitted small batches of specially equipped cars, such as those for local utilities, to be built. Someone figured out that it could also be used to produce cars that weren't normally allowed due to corporate restrictions - such as a 427-powered Camaro.

A special Corvette L88 427 with weight-saving cast-aluminum block was offered as a Camaro COPO. Coded ZL-1, the aluminum engine alone cost $4,000. As few racers could spend money on a car costing twice as much as the average muscle car - and with a less costly cast-iron COPO 425/427 also available, only 69 ZL-1 Camaros were built. All were 'base' Camaros; the plain exterior belies the car's true nature. The ZL-1 was rated at 430 horsepower, but headers raised output to a rumored 560 horsepower, making it the most powerful Camaro ever.
Convertible
 
The Camaro reset the standard for the entire 'pony car' genre, when it debuted in 1967. From the very beginning, customers could literally custom built their car from their dealer's pages of options and upgrade packages. This example of a Super Sport convertible came with the L-89 engine option, that specified Chevy's 396cid V8 rated at 375 bhp. Also included with this package was aluminum heads and a four-barrel carburetor

This car is one of eleven believed to have been built. It is one of five known to exist today. It has been kept in storage since the mid-1980s. It has its original matching number engine with correct date codes. It is the rarest of all production Camaros built and was treated to a 14 month frame-off restoration.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N698336
 
Sold for $76,861 at 2008 RM Auctions.
The Regular Production Option (RPO) Z28 package transformed the Camaro into a competition road-racing car. When first introduced, the Z28 was intended for professional racing teams, and for drivers such as Mark Donohue. The car quickly proved to be a capable racer in the SCCA Trans-Am series.

The Z28 package included a de-stroked 327 cubic-inch Chevy small-block engine, resulting in 302 cubic-inches of displacement. There were three cylinder heads and an aluminum intake manifold mounted a Holley four-barrel carburetor. The engine was rated at 290 horsepower, though in reality it was good for 350 to 400 horsepower. Other items in this option package included quicker steering, performance suspension, and power front disc brakes. A 'cross-ram' intake manifold was available which added an additional 50 horsepower to the engine.

By 1969, over 20,000 examples of the Z28 Camaro had been produced. 1969 was a big year for the Camaro, as it won the Trans-Am series and this would be the final year for hte first generation Camaro bodies.

This particular 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 has been given a complete, no expense spared restoration. It is painted in Hugger Orange with white stripes and there is a functional cowl induction hood and a rear spoiler. It was built at the Norwood, Ohio GM Assembly Plant and was fitted with many desirable performance options such as the DZ code 302 cubic-inch V8 engine with a cross-ram intake manifold. There is a Hurst-shifted close-ratio Muncie four-speed manual transmission. In the front there is a factory-equipped, lightweight fiberglass hood. The power from the engine is handled by a 12-bolt Posi-Traction rear end assembly, and sent to a set of period correct Goodyear Polyglas tires riding on rally wheels. To keep the car in the driver's control, there is a set of RPO JL8 rear disc brakes.

Inside there is hounds-tooth upholstery, black dash with wood grain trim, and a three-spoke steering wheel. Also, there is a power steering with tilt column, power brakes, an 8,000 RPM tachometer, floor console, and radio delete.

This Camaro Z28 has been featured on the July 2005 cover of Hot Rod magazine. In 2008, this vehicle was offered for sale at the 'Sports & Classics of Monterey' presented by RM Auctions. It had an estimated value of $40,000 - $60,000 and offered without reserve. The lot was sold for a high bid of $33,500, including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2009
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N644001
Engine Num: KM V4201DZ
 
Sold for $115,500 at 2009 Gooding & Company.
Sold for $156,750 at 2014 Gooding & Company.
The Z/28 Camaro was introduced by Chevrolet in 1967. It was a production car that went on to win that years SCCA Trans-Am Championship. The package included a small block, quick ratio steering, wider wheels, a close-ratio four-speed gearbox, and a revised suspension.

It is believed that just 56 customers ordered a Z/28 with the JL8 package that included Corvette two-piston calibers on the rear and rear, stronger axle shafts and bigger rear-axle bearings. This made the muscle car a car that could corner and stop in true performance fashion.

This Camaro Z/28 Sport Coupe was originally owned by Eliseo Lucarelli of Bradford, PA. It came equipped with the JL8 Package and the Cross Ram intake with dual quads, and lightweight fiberglass hood. It was later purchased by Ed Cuneen who later sold it to Otis Chandler. While in Chandler's collection, the car was featured in Randy Leffingwell's book American Muscle: Muscle Cars From The Otis Chandler Collection.

The next owner was Jay R. Miller and then Thomas Kunde before coming into the collection of the current owner. The car is currently finished in the classic combination of Hugger Orange with black racing stripes and vinyl top over a black interior. The car is still equipped with the original air-pump smog equipment, Rally wheels, console gauges, push-button radio and rare fiberglass hood. The odometer displays only 32,000 miles.

In 2009, this documented JL8, Cross-Ram, Dual-Quad Z/28 was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction in Scottsdale, Arizona where it was estimated to sell for $100,000 - $120,000. The lot was sold for the sum of $115,500 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2009
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
The Camaro was introduced in 1967 and brought with it the RS (characterized by hidden headlights), a muscular SS, and the high revving 302 cid Z/28. Chevrolet was at a disadvantage against its competitors across town inasmuch as GM prohibited Camaro engines larger than 400 CID. Enter Don Yenko, a Chevrolet dealer and performance enthusiast form Pennsylvania. Yenko began installed Corvette 427's into new Camaros and convinced Chevy personnel to approve a factory-built 427 for 1969, using a somewhat obscure ordering process typically reserved for fleets called the Central Office Production Order of COPO.

COPO 9561 featured a factory L72 427 boasting solid lifters and (a widely suspension understated) 425 horsepower with 4.10 gearing. COPO 9737, the Sport Car Conversion Kit, included 15-inch tires on Rally Wheels, a 140 mph speedometer, and a 13/16 inch front stabilizer bar. GM also offered COPO code 9560 for drag racing with an all-aluminum ZL1. That engine alone cost $4,000, nearly twice the cost of a base vehicle.

While Yenko Chevrolet is most closely associated with the COPO legend, other dealers quickly spotted the little-publicized ordering loophole. IN total, 1,015 street-legal Camaros were fitted with the L72 COPO option. This car came from Ewing Chevrolet of Canton, Ohio who - after Yenko - was one of the more prolific COPO dealers. It was ordered with both COPO 9561 and 9737 with racing in mind as attested to by early pictures of a tunnel ram hood scoop. Parked since 1978, it was lovingly restored in 2010.

By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2011
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
This 1969 Chevrolet Camaro RS was purchased in September of 1969 at Queen City Chevrolet. It is an all numbers matching vehicle that has had some body restoration and a repaint in 1994 since new.
By Daniel Vaughan | Jul 2009
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
According to Camaro historian Scott Settlemire, first generation Camaros in iconic colors such as Hugger Orange, shown here on a 1969 Camaro Sport Coupe, are some of the most sought-after and collectable Camaros.

Source - Chevrolet
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
This car was campaigned by Penske Racing for the entire 1969 SCCA Trans-Am season and earned Chevrolet the manufacturer's championship title beating every other factory effort. The Penske Camaro was driven by Mark Donohue, Ronnie Bucknum and Ed Leslie in the 1969 Trans-Am series with Mark Donohue winning the Driver's Championship. Only two 1969 Penske Camaros were built and this is the only example to survive today. The 1969 Penske Camaro's were designed and built by Penske Racing with significant assistance from Chevrolet engineering. This car was acid dipped after delivery and that process reduced the overall weight of the car. Penske also created air channels within the doors that allowed air that built up behind the front wheels to flow into the rear wheels which aided in cooling the rear brakes. These and other modifications coupled with the skill of the drivers and crew made Penske Racing more successful than any of the other factory teams. After the 1969 season this car was sold to Roy Woods Racing who had Milt Minter drive it in the 1970 Trans-Am series. Minter scored yet another victory at Donnybrooke, beating every other factory team race car including Penske's Racing's Javelin and Ford's two Bud Moore Bosses.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
Chevrolet unveiled the Camaro to the press at Detroit's Statler-Hilton hotel in September of 1966. It was intended to compete directly with the wildly popular Mustang when a reporter asked the GM product managers, 'What's a Camaro?' The GM spokesman responded that it was, 'A small vicious animal that eats Mustangs.'

The new Camaro was available in a variety of configurations ranging from mild six-cylinder engines to thunderous big blocks. The 1969 model received a slight but distinctive body refresh and total production was 243,085 units, 20,302 equipped with the Z/28 option. (The 1969 model year was very long as engineering problems delayed the 1970 Camaro launch.)

The Z/28 option was conceived specifically to compete in the immensely popular SSCA Trans Am road racing circuit as all the domestic manufacturers were fielding entries in the battle for podium finishes and bragging rights. And the Z/28's high revving, 11:1 compression, solid lifter 302 CID mill was right in its element. This first generation Camaro, produced until 1969, inspired the current retro-styled Camaro design.

The owner bought this car after looking at 16 others with his father. He drove it while in High School and began a frame-off restoration in 1998 that took 12 years to compete. Built in February 1969, it has been certified as an authentic Z/28 and includes optional equipment such as the special ducted hood and X-33 style trim.

1969 Camaro Named Best Chevy of All Time

Nearly 125,000 Chevrolet fans have spoken, naming the 1969 Camaro the 'Best Chevy of All Time.'

As part of Chevrolet's Centennial celebration, fans were asked to vote for their favorite vehicle from Chevrolet's 100-year history. During the four-round, elimination bracket, the 1969 Camaro garnered 25,058 of the 124,368 votes cast, edging out the 1970 Chevelle SS in the final round.

Tom Peters, Chevrolet Design director, believes the '69 Camaro is not only one of the best vehicles in Chevrolet's history but one of the best vehicles ever. He is a little biased, however, having owned the same 1969 Camaro for nearly 20 years.

'I can vividly remember seeing one for the first time as a kid,' Peters §äid. 'The intent of the Camaro was instantly understood, even to a 14-year old like me, because it possessed a very powerful personality and an elegant, simple design. The Camaro was so cool because it offered this great style, high performance, and yet was attainable for someone just getting out of school.

'Today, the '69 Camaro has become one of the best examples of timeless design in the ,' Peters §äid. 'Like the very best designs, the Camaro is much more than just a machine because it evokes powerful emotions in people of all ages. That's why we looked to the '69 for inspiration when designing the fifth-generation Camaro, and why the '69 Camaro is an example of the timeless vehicles Chevrolet will strive to deliver for the next 100 years.'

Source - Chevrolet
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
Don Yenko Chevrolet, a Canonsburg, Pennsylvania Chevrolet dealer, made a deal with General Motors' Chevrolet Motor Division to have the factory install the 427 cubic-inch, 450 horsepower V-8 under the C.O.P.O. (Central Office Production Order) program, which allowed the cars to have a factory warranty.

The Yenko dealership added its own custom stripes, logos, headers, hood scoop and wheels, making these cars truly unique.

This is one of the very few Yenko Camaros that remains its original engine, transmission and differential.

For 20 years this Camaro was part of the collection of the late Otis Chandler, who maintained an outstanding collection of rare American Classic automobiles and muscle cars.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
The first generation Camaro production ran from September 29, 1966, ending in 1969. GM offered their new rear-wheel drive F-body platform (shared with the Pontiac Firebird) as both a 2-door coupe and convertible, both with 2+2 seating. Like Ford's Mustang, there were several engine options from the straight 6-cylinder of 250 cubic-inches to 396 cubic-inch V8, via the most popular 302 V8 small-block. The Z28 designation added $458 to the $2,726 base price and gave a suspension package with 7-inch rims, quicker steering and (typically) twin rally stripes. Front discs were standard. Further, Chevrolet offered what turned out to be their least restrictive exhaust system ever.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379N566465
 
Sold for $51,700 at 2011 Barrett-Jackson.
Sold for $55,000 at 2011 Russo & Steele.
Sold for $46,200 at 2012 Russo & Steele.
Sold for $60,500 at 2012 Gooding & Company.
The Chevrolet Camaro Special-Performance package was offered from 1967 through 1969. Giving the Z/28 its name, the Special- Performance package was designed to make the Camaro eligible for racing in the SCCA Trans Am series. For 1967, production reached just 602 cars. Figures would continue to climb as the model collected various racing victories, with a total of 7,199 cars sold in 1968 and 20,302 cars sold the following year.

The heartbeat of the Z28 package was a high-performance 302 cubic-inch version of the Chevrolet small-block V-8 engine, rated at nearly 300 horsepower and was exclusive to the Z/28 model. Pricing for the 1969 Z28 package cost between $458 and $522, the price rising as the model year progressed. It also included special front and rear suspension, quick-ratio steering, 15' x 7' Rally wheels, a heavy-duty radiator with temperature-controlled fan and a 3.73:1 rear axle ratio. Also purchasing the Z/28 package required the buyer to select the optional four-speed manual transmission and power front disc brakes.

In 2012, the car was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction in Scottsdale, Az. It was estimated to sell for $70,000 - $90,000 and offered without reserve. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $60,500 inclusive of buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2012
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
During the 1970 and 1971 SCCA TransAm races, the Big Three budgets allowed them to campaign multi-car teams. But there was also room for those that didn't get the big-ticket factory contracts or the factory cash. If there is a will there is a way and no other Trans Am car from the day personifies that approach more than this Camaro.

How about a race car built to compete in America's premier professional road series by a group of college students? University of Pittsburgh engineering student Bob Fryer led the way as his enthusiastic group of students constructed this car. They went on to campaign the car in several SCCA TransAm races in 1970 and 1971.

This car was restored in 1992 and has been attending vintage races and concours ever since.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: 124379L501175
 
Sold for $110,000 at 2013 Gooding & Company.
This Camaro is a RS/SS that has been given a premium restoration. It was built in the first week of September of 1968 and is one of the earliest of the 1969 models, which went into production that month. The car has several changeover features from the 1968 design, most notably the shorter rear spoiler and the early 6,000/7,000 RPM tachometer.

It is equipped with many factory options, including the rosewood steering wheel and console, power steering, AM/FM radio, Endura bumper, high-ratio 3.73:1 Posi-Traction rear end, heavy-duty radiator, and the Rally Sport and Super Sport trim packages. The L89 was the most powerful RPO, or regular production option, available in 1969. It was fitted to just 311 examples. The L89 offered 375 horsepower and used an aluminum cylinder head to achieve 50 HP more than the standard version. At $711, the engine option was more than twice as expensive as the next best available motor.

The car is trimmed with an ivory houndstooth interior, the upper-level upholstery option for 1969.

The car was delivered to Crawford Chevrolet in Ventura, California and sold in December of 1968. The current owner treated it to a full restoration to concours-ready state.

The car has a Muncie M21 transmission, original two-piece brake rotors, correct spiral shocks, and properly date-coded glass. It has been refinished in its original livery of Rallye Green paint with SS stripes and a white vinyl roof over the houndstooth interior.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2013
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
This Chevy Camaro, painted in Hugger Orange with a black vinyl top, is the 1969th example built. It was ordered as a no-option, strictly-business muscle car. The original owner of this vehicle disregarded the normal creature comforts including radio, gauges, and spoilers in order to attain the only thing that really mattered - the SS option. The car currently has just 3,900 miles on the odometer.

The no-option lack of a rear spoiler along with standard wheels gives this car an untraditional stance that commands attention wherever it is present.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2014
Hardtop Sport Coupe
Chassis Num: TA-072
 
Jack Westlund of Everett, Washington purchased a brand new 1968 Camaro Z-28 in the summer of 1968. He drove it on the street for about 500 miles. At that point Jack and his son Ken, began converting the car to A-Sedan specifications.

The car was prepared with a single four-barrel carburetor and American Mag wheels. A fairly simple roll cage was built. The car was successfully raced in A-Sedan Regional and National events in the Pacific Northwest in 1968 and early 1969. Jack's friend, Steve Heath, assisted with much of the mechanical work. Ken Westlund believes that the car was raced in the Kent 300 TransAm event in October of 1968. This however, has not yet been substantiated.

Jack wanted to run the Trans-Am events on the West Coast in 1969. In an attempt to secure additional sponsorship from a Chevrolet Dealer, Jack, Steve, and Ken began updating the car to 1969 Camaro specifications. The first addition was a 2X4 Crossram intake. This was followed by 1969 front sheetmetal, and finally, full 1969 quarter panels and rear valance.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
The first generation Chevrolet Camaro appeared in Chevrolet dealerships in September of 1966 for the 1967 model year on a brand-new rear-wheel drive GM F-body platform and would be available as a 2-door, 2+2 seat, coupe or convertible with a choice of six-cylinder and V8 powertrains. The first generation Camaro would last up through the 1969 model year.

The Z/28 performance package was designed (with further modifications) to compete in the SCCA Trans-Am series. It included a solid-lifter 302 V8, 4-speed transmission, power disc brakes and two wide stripes down the hood and decklid.

This example, currently on display at the Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, KY, was sold new at VV Cook in Louisville, KY and has undergone a total frame-off restoration.
Hardtop Sport Coupe
 
In the world of first generation Camaro's, there are a lot of letters. SS, RS, Z/28 and of course COPO come to mind. When it comes to desirability, it is hard to top a true 427 COPO.

The COPO designation stands for Central Office Production Order. This was an internal code used mostly in the fleet division for taxis, police and municipal cars and a variety of trucks. Other deviations from the norm may also call for the COPO designation, as is the case with the 1969 COPO Camaro's and Chevelles.

It is believed that Don Yenko, a performance oriented dealer in Pennsylvania was the first to use this code to order the 427 engine, previously not available in the Camaro, for his special conversions. Prior to 1969, Yenko would actually remove the drive-train to install the larger 427 to create what is now referred to as a 'Supercar.'

Some dealers and customers in the know would use this to create their own COPO cars. The Camaro would be the most popular choice, although Yenko is credited with ordering over 200 of them for his own conversion use.

Today, COPO 427 Camaro's are among the most coveted and sought after General Motors muscle cars ever built. This particular car is made even rarer by the addition of various options including the R.S. package, which adds a variety of trim including the hideaway headlights. Splendid in Hugger Orange, this car recently received an extensive restoration.
The Chevrolet Camaro was introduced in 1967 as a compact car specifically built to provide competition for the highly popular Ford Mustang. This pony car was built atop of the same F-Body platform as the Pontiac Firebird, which had a similar production lifespan of 1967 through 2002.

During the preproduction stages of the Chevrolet Camaro, General Motors codenamed the vehicle 'Panther'. The name 'Camaro' was decided upon before production began. The word 'Camaro' in French is slang for 'friend' but in pony-car slang, the name means 'Mustang killer'.

During its production lifespan, there were four generations produced. The first generation lasted from 1967 through 1969. The second generation lasted from 1972 through 1981. The third generation lasted from 1982 through 1992. The fourth generation lasted from 1993 through 2002. The fifth generation is believed to begin production in 2007; a concept was shown at the 2006 Detroit Auto Show.

When the car was introduced in 1967, it was available in two bodystyles, a coupe and convertible. It shared many mechanics with the Chevrolet Nova and built atop a unibody chassis. The base engine was a 3.7 liter inline-six cylinder capable of producing 140 horsepower. Power was sent to the rear wheels courtesy of a Saginaw three-speed manual gearbox. A Muncie four-speed manual and a two-speed PowerGlide automatic were offered as optional equipment. Near the end of 1967, a Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 became available on the SS396. In 1969 the TH350 was offered on the Camaro as optional equipment, in place of the PowerGlide which was no longer offered. 14 inch wheels were standard.

To compete in the pony-car arena, General Motors offered a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine in 1967 that produced nearly 300 horsepower.

The Camaro was highly customizable, with over seventy factory and forty dealer options available. the z28 option was not mentioned in the sales literature so many buyers were unaware of its existence. Due to the lack of press about the Z28 option, only 602 examples were produced. The package included many performance enhancements such as a 4.9 liter small-block engine, front disc brakes, Muncie 4-speed gearbox, suspension improvements, 15 inch Rallye wheels, and power steering. The aesthetics of the vehicle were segregated from the other Camaro's with racing stripes being placed on the hood. The Z28 package was offered by GM specifically to comply with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans Am racing series that required an engine size of five-liters or less. Also, the vehicle must be sold to the general public.

The SS (Super Sport) package included many performance and aesthetic upgrades and was popular with more than 34400 examples created. Under the hood was a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine with a 6.5 liter big-block offered as optional equipment in 1968. On the grille, horn button, and gas cap were SS badging. Non-functional air-inlets adorned the front hood.

The RS (Rally Sport) package was basically a cosmetic upgrade. The headlights were hidden, the taillights received minor alterations, and the exterior rocker trim was revised. RS badging could be seen throughout the vehicle. This was the most popular option ordered in 1967 with over 64840 examples produced.

The RS and SS packages could be ordered together, creating the RS/SS Camaro. The combination included both the aesthetics of the RS and the performance of the SS. A Camaro RS/SS convertible with a 6.5 liter engine paced the Indianapolis 500 race in 1967.

With over 220900 examples produced in 1967, the Camaro proved to General Motors that the public was starved for small, performance, pony-cars.

In 1968 the Camaro received minor aesthetic and mechanical improvements. Side market lights were added, the grille became more pointed, and the taillights were now segregated. The side vent windows were removed. Performance was improved slightly by the staggering of the shock absorbers. On some of the models, the single-leafs were replaced by multi-leaf springs.

Buyers became aware of the Z28 package in 1968 and ordered nearly 7200 examples. The RS continued to be the most popular option with 40977 examples produced. The SS accounted for 27884 of the 235147 total Camaro's produced in 1968.

For 1969 the Camaro became safer and faster. General Motors mandated that the Camaro could not come from the factory with engines larger than 6.6 liters. To bypass this rule dealerships such as Yenko Chevrolet, Dana Chevrolet, and Nickey Chevrolet offered the Camaro with the 7 liter, big-block, L-27 corvette engine producing 425 horsepower. These performance options became so popular that in 1969 Chevrolet began offering two Central Office Production Orders (COPO) options, numbers 9560 and 9561. The COPO 9561 option included the L-72 Corvette engine. In total, there were 1015 Camaros equipped with the L-72 Corvette engine.

The COPO 9560 option included a 7-liter, big-block, ZL-1 engine. The engine was constructed of aluminum to help reduce the overall weight. The engine was reported to have produced around 430 gross horsepower but in reality it was closer to 550. With only 69 examples produced it is one of the rarest and fastest of all Chevrolet Camaros.

Most of the 1969 Chevrolet Camaro mechanics remained unchanged. The aesthetics was a different story. The grille was redesigned and the headlights now sat farther back adding to the aggressive features of the car. Newly reshaped door, rear quarter panel, and rear valence gave the 1969 Camaro a smooth, low, and wide stance. The production of the 1969 Camaro, which continued into December of 1969, was the final year for the first generation Camaro.

The second generation Camaro began production near the middle of 1970. The body had been redesigned and the suspension was greatly improved. The rest of the mechanics remained mostly unchanged from the prior years. The biggest change was the base engine, which was now a 4.1 liter inline-six capable of producing 155 horsepower. There was no convertible option offered, only a 2+2 coupe configuration.

The big-block eight-cylinder had been bored to 402 cubic-inches but still retained its 396 badging. The Rally Sport, Super Sport, and Z28 packages were still available. The Z28 now featured a 5.7 liter engine that produced 360 horsepower.

1972 was not a good year for the Camaro. For 174 days production ceased at GM's assembly plant in Ohio due to a UAW strike. This resulted in 1100 Camaro's failing to meet 1973 Federal bumper safety standards. In total, only 68,656 examples were production. Less than a thousand were the SS package so General Motors decided to no longer offer the package after 1972. This meant the big-block 396 cubic-inch engine was no longer offered.

The Camaro, much like the rest of the industry, had to adapt to new government and insurance safety and emission regulations. This meant new safety features like larger bumpers needed to be affixed to the car that could protect the vehicle and its occupants at certain speeds. Engines were detuned to comply with safety and emission concerns. The cars became safer but their performance was seriously crippled. This was true for the Camaro in 1973 when its highest producing engine was a 350 cubic-inch V-8 that produced 245 horsepower.

New for 1973 was an LT option which included impact-absorbing bumpers. The Camaro grew in size in 1974 due to a forward sloping grille and new aluminum bumpers. Rectangular bumpers replaced the round taillight designs. Sales of the Z28 package continued to decline so the decision was made to discontinue the option after 1974.

Horsepower was measured in NET rather than gross rating beginning in 1975. This meant that the reported horsepower was much lower than in prior years. The 350 cubic-inch V8 was now rated at about 155 horsepower.

In 1977 the Z28 was re-introduced in an effort to revitalize the muscle-car persona of the Camaro. The base Camaro's were outfitted with air-conditioning and an automatic transmission. A Borg-Warner Super T-10 four-speed manual gearbox could be ordered as optional equipment.

1978 marked the first year for the T-top option on a Camaro. The Camaro was given larger taillights and new bumpers.

As vehicles became safer, they became slower. The public shifted from wanting performance to luxury. Oil embargos and rising fuel costs had made the engines smaller but more fuel efficient. For 1979 the LT package was replaced with a luxurious Berlinetta that included special wheels, paint, emblems, and interior.

1979 was a very strong year for Camaro sales with 282,571 examples being sold.

1980 and 1981 saw very few changes. The hood scope on the Z-28 was revised to help siphon air to the engine.

In 1981 sales were down considerable to just over 126,000. This would be the final year for the second generation Camaro.

In 1982 General Motors introduced the third generation of the Camaro. The vehicle was stylish and versatile, earning the coveted Motor Trend magazine's Car of the Year. Both aesthetically and mechanically, the vehicle was improved. The suspension was upgraded making it more capable in the corners and at speed.

This was the first year the Camaro was equipped with a factory fuel-injected engine. A four-speed automatic gearbox replaced the three-speed unit. A five-speed manual gearbox was also available. Due to rising concerns of oil shortage, a four-cylinder engine was offered for part of 1982.

6000 examples of the Z28 Camaro were sold to commemorate the return of the pony-car to the Indianapolis 500. The special-edition vehicles were painted in two-tone silver and blue paint with orange pin-striping.

To honor the International Race of Champions, Chevrolet introduced the IROC-Z in 1985. The package included an improved suspension, decal package, and a 305 cubic-inch L98 Tuned Port Injection system borrowed from the Corvette. The IROC-Z was featured on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best List for 1985.

The L69 small-block engine was offered from 1983 through 1986. The LB9 small-block was introduced in 1985; the L98 small-block was introduced in 1987; the LO3 was introduced in 1988. The LB9, L98, and LO3 stayed in production until 1992.

1992 was the final year for the third generation Camaro. 1993 marked the beginning of the fourth generation which persisted until 2002.

New technology and material made the fourth generation greatly improved over the prior years. Weight was reduced with the use of plastic body panels sitting atop a steel space frame. Performance was increased thanks in part to a better suspension system. In 1993 Chevrolet offered the LT1 eight-cylinder engine, which had been in production for a year on the Corvette, on the Camaro. A six-speed manual gearbox was offered with the LT1 engine.

The Camaro returned to the Indianapolis 500 as the honorary pace car in 1993. To commemorate this historic accomplishment, Chevrolet offered a limited quantity of special edition Camaro's, painted in a black and white color scheme.

The design and mechanics remained mostly unchanged over the next few years. Minor revisions were made to comply with newly introduced emission standards. Mechanical changes were made to correct problems that had been found throughout the years.

In 1996 the RS package and the SS package were re-introduced. The RS was an appearance option for the six-cylinder Camaro's while the SS was both an appearance and performance package for the eight-cylinder cars.

1997 marked the 30th anniversary of the Camaro. A 30th Anniversary Package was offered to honor this accomplishment. The vehicles were painted white with orange stripes. 100 of the Anniversary Camaros were given the LT4 engine with 330 horsepower; a thirty-eight thousand dollar price tag accompanied the vehicle.

The interior of the Camaro was modernized in 1997 and again in 1998, although the 1998 improvements were minor in comparison to what transpired the prior year.

The body design was drastically changed in 1998, mainly in the front. Round headlights replaced the square design. The headlights were flush, inline with the rest of the body. A new grille and bumper were used, both positioned a little differently to mimic the headlight changes. A new powerful, lightweight, all-aluminum LS1 power-plant retired the LT1 unit. The OHV LS1 was borrowed from the Corvette and slightly detuned to produce just over 300 horsepower. To handle this extra power, the disc brakes were enlarged and the suspension was upgraded.

Total production for 1998 was 48490. This was disappointing for General Motors, especially with the newly revised body and powerful options. The lowest production year for the Camaro occurred in 2001 with just over 29000 examples being produced. This was due to low sales and production ceasing early to begin work on the 35th Anniversary 2002 cars.

2002 marked the final year for production of the fifth generation Camaro. The styling and mechanics were unmodified, carrying the same design from 1999.

A special 35th Anniversary Edition was offered and could be ordered on all trim levels and packages. The 35th Anniversary SS Camaro could only be ordered as a convertible or with T-Tops. Around 3000 examples of the 35th Anniversary Edition were created. Total production for the year was just over 42,000.

On August 27th, 2002 production ceased. The Camaro had accomplished its goal, to provide competition for the Ford Mustang and other compact, low-priced, sports cars. Outfitted with large, Corvette engines, matted to effective gearboxes and given great suspension and brakes, the Camaro was truly a performance machine that was capable and fun to drive. It was fairly practical with room for more than two passengers. It was economical with sticker-prices in the range that many could afford. The production of the Camaro has ceased, but its future has not yet been written. Expect to see this legendary vehicle on the roadways in the near future.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2011
The Chevrolet Camaro was introduced in 1967 as a compact car specifically built to provide competition for the highly popular Ford Mustang. This pony car was built atop of the same F-Body platform as the Pontiac Firebird, which had a similar production lifespan of 1967 through 2002.

During the preproduction stages of the Chevrolet Camaro, General Motors codenamed the vehicle 'Panther'. The name 'Camaro' was decided upon before production began. The word 'Camaro' in French is slang for 'friend' but in pony-car slang, the name means 'Mustang killer'.

During its production lifespan, there were four generations produced. The first generation lasted from 1967 through 1969. The second generation lasted from 1972 through 1981. The third generation lasted from 1982 through 1992. The fourth generation lasted from 1993 through 2002. The fifth generation is believed to begin production in 2007; a concept was shown at the 2006 Detroit Auto Show.

When the car was introduced in 1967, it was available in two bodystyles, a coupe and convertible. It shared many mechanics with the Chevrolet Nova and built atop a unibody chassis. The base engine was a 3.7 liter inline-six cylinder capable of producing 140 horsepower. Power was sent to the rear wheels courtesy of a Saginaw three-speed manual gearbox. A Muncie four-speed manual and a two-speed PowerGlide automatic were offered as optional equipment. Near the end of 1967, a Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 became available on the SS396. In 1969 the TH350 was offered on the Camaro as optional equipment, in place of the PowerGlide which was no longer offered. 14 inch wheels were standard.

To compete in the pony-car arena, General Motors offered a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine in 1967 that produced nearly 300 horsepower.

The Camaro was highly customizable, with over seventy factory and forty dealer options available. the z28 option was not mentioned in the sales literature so many buyers were unaware of its existence. Due to the lack of press about the Z28 option, only 602 examples were produced. The package included many performance enhancements such as a 4.9 liter small-block engine, front disc brakes, Muncie 4-speed gearbox, suspension improvements, 15 inch Rallye wheels, and power steering. The aesthetics of the vehicle were segregated from the other Camaro's with racing stripes being placed on the hood. The Z28 package was offered by GM specifically to comply with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans Am racing series that required an engine size of five-liters or less. Also, the vehicle must be sold to the general public.

The SS (Super Sport) package included many performance and aesthetic upgrades and was popular with more than 34400 examples created. Under the hood was a 5.7 liter eight-cylinder engine with a 6.5 liter big-block offered as optional equipment in 1968. On the grille, horn button, and gas cap were SS badging. Non-functional air-inlets adorned the front hood.

The RS (Rally Sport) package was basically a cosmetic upgrade. The headlights were hidden, the taillights received minor alterations, and the exterior rocker trim was revised. RS badging could be seen throughout the vehicle. This was the most popular option ordered in 1967 with over 64840 examples produced.

The RS and SS packages could be ordered together, creating the RS/SS Camaro. The combination included both the aesthetics of the RS and the performance of the SS. A Camaro RS/SS convertible with a 6.5 liter engine paced the Indianapolis 500 race in 1967.

With over 220900 examples produced in 1967, the Camaro proved to General Motors that the public was starved for small, performance, pony-cars.

In 1968 the Camaro received minor aesthetic and mechanical improvements. Side market lights were added, the grille became more pointed, and the taillights were now segregated. The side vent windows were removed. Performance was improved slightly by the staggering of the shock absorbers. On some of the models, the single-leafs were replaced by multi-leaf springs.

Buyers became aware of the Z28 package in 1968 and ordered nearly 7200 examples. The RS continued to be the most popular option with 40977 examples produced. The SS accounted for 27884 of the 235147 total Camaro's produced in 1968.

For 1969 the Camaro became safer and faster. General Motors mandated that the Camaro could not come from the factory with engines larger than 6.6 liters. To bypass this rule dealerships such as Yenko Chevrolet, Dana Chevrolet, and Nickey Chevrolet offered the Camaro with the 7 liter, big-block, L-27 corvette engine producing 425 horsepower. These performance options became so popular that in 1969 Chevrolet began offering two Central Office Production Orders (COPO) options, numbers 9560 and 9561. The COPO 9561 option included the L-72 Corvette engine. In total, there were 1015 Camaros equipped with the L-72 Corvette engine.

The COPO 9560 option included a 7-liter, big-block, ZL-1 engine. The engine was constructed of aluminum to help reduce the overall weight. The engine was reported to have produced around 430 gross horsepower but in reality it was closer to 550. With only 69 examples produced it is one of the rarest and fastest of all Chevrolet Camaros.

Most of the 1969 Chevrolet Camaro mechanics remained unchanged. The aesthetics was a different story. The grille was redesigned and the headlights now sat farther back adding to the aggressive features of the car. Newly reshaped door, rear quarter panel, and rear valence gave the 1969 Camaro a smooth, low, and wide stance. The production of the 1969 Camaro, which continued into December of 1969, was the final year for the first generation Camaro.

The second generation Camaro began production near the middle of 1970. The body had been redesigned and the suspension was greatly improved. The rest of the mechanics remained mostly unchanged from the prior years. The biggest change was the base engine, which was now a 4.1 liter inline-six capable of producing 155 horsepower. There was no convertible option offered, only a 2+2 coupe configuration.

The big-block eight-cylinder had been bored to 402 cubic-inches but still retained its 396 badging. The Rally Sport, Super Sport, and Z28 packages were still available. The Z28 now featured a 5.7 liter engine that produced 360 horsepower.

1972 was not a good year for the Camaro. For 174 days production ceased at GM's assembly plant in Ohio due to a UAW strike. This resulted in 1100 Camaro's failing to meet 1973 Federal bumper safety standards. In total, only 68,656 examples were production. Less than a thousand were the SS package so General Motors decided to no longer offer the package after 1972. This meant the big-block 396 cubic-inch engine was no longer offered.

The Camaro, much like the rest of the industry, had to adapt to new government and insurance safety and emission regulations. This meant new safety features like larger bumpers needed to be affixed to the car that could protect the vehicle and its occupants at certain speeds. Engines were detuned to comply with safety and emission concerns. The cars became safer but their performance was seriously crippled. This was true for the Camaro in 1973 when its highest producing engine was a 350 cubic-inch V-8 that produced 245 horsepower.

New for 1973 was an LT option which included impact-absorbing bumpers. The Camaro grew in size in 1974 due to a forward sloping grille and new aluminum bumpers. Rectangular bumpers replaced the round taillight designs. Sales of the Z28 package continued to decline so the decision was made to discontinue the option after 1974.

Horsepower was measured in NET rather than gross rating beginning in 1975. This meant that the reported horsepower was much lower than in prior years. The 350 cubic-inch V8 was now rated at about 155 horsepower.

In 1977 the Z28 was re-introduced in an effort to revitalize the muscle-car persona of the Camaro. The base Camaro's were outfitted with air-conditioning and an automatic transmission. A Borg-Warner Super T-10 four-speed manual gearbox could be ordered as optional equipment.

1978 marked the first year for the T-top option on a Camaro. The Camaro was given larger taillights and new bumpers.

As vehicles became safer, they became slower. The public shifted from wanting performance to luxury. Oil embargos and rising fuel costs had made the engines smaller but more fuel efficient. For 1979 the LT package was replaced with a luxurious Berlinetta that included special wheels, paint, emblems, and interior.

1979 was a very strong year for Camaro sales with 282,571 examples being sold.

1980 and 1981 saw very few changes. The hood scope on the Z-28 was revised to help siphon air to the engine.

In 1981 sales were down considerable to just over 126,000. This would be the final year for the second generation Camaro.

In 1982 General Motors introduced the third generation of the Camaro. The vehicle was stylish and versatile, earning the coveted Motor Trend magazine's Car of the Year. Both aesthetically and mechanically, the vehicle was improved. The suspension was upgraded making it more capable in the corners and at speed.

This was the first year the Camaro was equipped with a factory fuel-injected engine. A four-speed automatic gearbox replaced the three-speed unit. A five-speed manual gearbox was also available. Due to rising concerns of oil shortage, a four-cylinder engine was offered for part of 1982.

6000 examples of the Z28 Camaro were sold to commemorate the return of the pony-car to the Indianapolis 500. The special-edition vehicles were painted in two-tone silver and blue paint with orange pin-striping.

To honor the International Race of Champions, Chevrolet introduced the IROC-Z in 1985. The package included an improved suspension, decal package, and a 305 cubic-inch L98 Tuned Port Injection system borrowed from the Corvette. The IROC-Z was featured on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best List for 1985.

The L69 small-block engine was offered from 1983 through 1986. The LB9 small-block was introduced in 1985; the L98 small-block was introduced in 1987; the LO3 was introduced in 1988. The LB9, L98, and LO3 stayed in production until 1992.

1992 was the final year for the third generation Camaro. 1993 marked the beginning of the fourth generation which persisted until 2002.

New technology and material made the fourth generation greatly improved over the prior years. Weight was reduced with the use of plastic body panels sitting atop a steel space frame. Performance was increased thanks in part to a better suspension system. In 1993 Chevrolet offered the LT1 eight-cylinder engine, which had been in production for a year on the Corvette, on the Camaro. A six-speed manual gearbox was offered with the LT1 engine.

The Camaro returned to the Indianapolis 500 as the honorary pace car in 1993. To commemorate this historic accomplishment, Chevrolet offered a limited quantity of special edition Camaro's, painted in a black and white color scheme.

The design and mechanics remained mostly unchanged over the next few years. Minor revisions were made to comply with newly introduced emission standards. Mechanical changes were made to correct problems that had been found throughout the years.

In 1996 the RS package and the SS package were re-introduced. The RS was an appearance option for the six-cylinder Camaro's while the SS was both an appearance and performance package for the eight-cylinder cars.

1997 marked the 30th anniversary of the Camaro. A 30th Anniversary Package was offered to honor this accomplishment. The vehicles were painted white with orange stripes. 100 of the Anniversary Camaros were given the LT4 engine with 330 horsepower; a thirty-eight thousand dollar price tag accompanied the vehicle.

The interior of the Camaro was modernized in 1997 and again in 1998, although the 1998 improvements were minor in comparison to what transpired the prior year.

The body design was drastically changed in 1998, mainly in the front. Round headlights replaced the square design. The headlights were flush, inline with the rest of the body. A new grille and bumper were used, both positioned a little differently to mimic the headlight changes. A new powerful, lightweight, all-aluminum LS1 power-plant retired the LT1 unit. The OHV LS1 was borrowed from the Corvette and slightly detuned to produce just over 300 horsepower. To handle this extra power, the disc brakes were enlarged and the suspension was upgraded.

Total production for 1998 was 48490. This was disappointing for General Motors, especially with the newly revised body and powerful options. The lowest production year for the Camaro occurred in 2001 with just over 29000 examples being produced. This was due to low sales and production ceasing early to begin work on the 35th Anniversary 2002 cars.

2002 marked the final year for production of the fifth generation Camaro. The styling and mechanics were unmodified, carrying the same design from 1999.

A special 35th Anniversary Edition was offered and could be ordered on all trim levels and packages. The 35th Anniversary SS Camaro could only be ordered as a convertible or with T-Tops. Around 3000 examples of the 35th Anniversary Edition were created. Total production for the year was just over 42,000.

On August 27th, 2002 production ceased. The Camaro had accomplished its goal, to provide competition for the Ford Mustang and other compact, low-priced, sports cars. Outfitted with large, Corvette engines, matted to effective gearboxes and given great suspension and brakes, the Camaro was truly a performance machine that was capable and fun to drive. It was fairly practical with room for more than two passengers. It was economical with sticker-prices in the range that many could afford. The production of the Camaro has ceased, but its future has not yet been written. Expect to see this legendary vehicle on the roadways in the near future.

By Daniel Vaughan | May 2011
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15 Exciting Collector Automobiles to Watch During This January's Scottsdale, Arizona Car Week Auctions
Scottsdale, Arizona (January 13th, 2016) – Astute Collectors of the world's most sought after and most valuable automobiles know that Scottsdale, Arizona in January is where the market values for collector cars are established each year. As such, they make it primary lifestyle destination and year in and year out it is the one of only a select group of internationally recognized locations that provides all the fundamental essentials that attract the best buyers and sellers from around the world....[Read more...]
GENERAL MOTORS GALORE AT MECUM KISSIMMEE 2016
• '69 Trans Am Convertibles, '69 ZL1s and Featured Corvettes at Auction, Jan. 15-24
Walworth, Wis. – Jan. 12, 2016 – As the world's largest collector-car auction featuring 3,000 vehicles, Mecum Kissimmee is unequaled in its variety of makes and models being offered this year. An auction historically dominated by 'The Big Three,' for 2016, more than one-third of the cars set to cross the auction block hail from the factories of General Motors, including more than 200 Corvettes, m...[Read more...]
The Crescendo Effect: As the Days Get Closer, The Cars Get Bigger at Russo and Steele's 15th Anniversary Auction Event!
Scottsdale, Arizona (January 6th, 2015) – For Enthusiasts – By Enthusiasts. ™ This is far more than a tagline at Russo and Steele Collector Automobile Auctions. It's a lifestyle, and we are gearing up to deliver that singular passion to the High Desert of sunny Scottsdale, Arizona for our annual flagship event during the world renowned collector car week. Additionally, Scottsdale marks the kick-off of the year-long celebration of our 15th anniversary. Held over five thrilling and actio...[Read more...]

150
210
Astro
Avalanche
Aveo
Bel Air
Beretta
Biscayne
Blazer
C10 / K10
Camaro
Cameo
Caprice
Cavalier
Chevelle
Citation
Cobalt
Colorado
Corvair
Corvette
Corvette GTP
Cruze
DB Master
Deluxe Series
El Camino
El Morocco
Equinox
Express
Fleetline
Greenbrier
HHR
Impala
Kingswood
Laguna
Malibu
Metro
Model 3100
Model H
Monte Carlo
Monza
Nova
Prizm
RPO B2K Twin Turbo
S-10
Series 490
Series C
Series L
Silverado
Sonic
Spark
Special Series
SS
SSR
Styleline
Suburban
Tahoe
Task Force (Apache)
Tracker
TrailBlazer
Traverse
Trax
Uplander
Vega
Venture
Volt

Image Left 1968 Camaro Z28Image Left 1968 Camaro Series
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