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1910 Brush Model D news, pictures, specifications, and information

Runabout
 
In the early 1900s small open car craze swept the Únited States. This eagerness for this type of car was soon satisfied by cars like the 1910 Brush Model D Runabout. Runabouts (also called 'Gentlemen's Roadsters') were designed wîth no consideration given to comfort or weather protection. For several years manufacturers resisted making changes to the successful design, and as a result the cars began to look out-of-date. By 1920, the Runabout was almost extinct.

Alanson P. Brush had helped Henry Leland design the original Cadillac one-cylinder engine. In 1907 he decided to build a low-cost one-cylinder car marketed under his own name. The Brush was successful for a number of years, owing in large part to it s affordable price. The 1910-1911 model ranged in cost from $350 to $850.

Source - Frick Car Museum
Runabout
 
During the first decade of the 20th Century, hundreds of American manufacturers introduced a wide variety of automobiles. The Brush Runabout Company (1907-1911) focused on building small, well crafted machines that consistently proved themselves in events like the Glidden Tour and the Pike's Peak climb. Coil springs at all four corners and wooden axles (and frame) combine to give the car excellent balance. This roadster was rescued from a barn by its last private owner. After restoration it received numerous AACA awards, including a Grand National in 1980.

Source - AACA Museum
Runabout
 
Alanson P. Brush founded the Brush Runabout Company in 1906 in Detroit, Michigan. Alanson was a respected technical innovator though he had no formal technical training. His resume included working for Henry Leland's manufacturing company where he was engaged to solve design problems on the first Oldsmobiles, Buicks, and Cadillacs.

The Brush Company would be later absorbed into the United States Motor Company. The U.S. Motors collapsed in 1912 and would bring the end of the Brush automobiles.

The Brush automobiles were built using mainly Michigan hardwoods, with axles and wheels fabricated from hickory, frame and flooring from oak and the seat structure from poplar.

The Model D rode on an 80-inch wheelbase and powered by a single-cylinder engine offering 10 horsepower. The car weighed 950 pounds and cost $485.

A California man purchased this car and it remained in his family for three generations. In 2008, the current owner acquired the car from the original family in a partially assembled condition. The restoration work took two years to complete.

By Daniel Vaughan | Aug 2010
Brass and Classic Era Automobiles Set to Shine at RM's Annual Hershey Sale
• RM Auctions returns to Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 10–11, for its well-established Hershey sale • Two-day auction presents more than 100 automobiles, with a focus on exceptional Brass and Classic Era motor cars • Coinciding with the popular AACA Eastern Regional Fall Meet, the sale is a highlight of the meet weekend • Frequently updated list of entries available online at rmauctions.com BLENHEIM, Ontario (July 30, 2013) – RM Auctions, the world's largest collector car auction ...[Read more...]
Lincoln at Los Angeles Auto Show Press Days: Celebration of Its Past and Future As Brand Rolls Out Its Reinvention
> The brand pays tribute to its heritage today, displaying seven of the most influential Lincoln designs > Thursday sees a display full of the all-new MKZ premium midsize sedan and MKZ Hybrid, the future of Lincoln, on the Lincoln stand > Lincoln launches on Tumblr http://lincolnnow.tumblr.com beginning with the visually stunning classic Lincolns shown on the stand and select images from archives. Continues with an all-new collection of photographs by photographers Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg ...[Read more...]


Collectible: A Gathering of the Exceptional and Captivating
Similarly Priced Vehicles from 1910
Maxwell Model AA ($600-$600)
Duryea Electa Phaeton ($625-$900)
Flanders 20 ($750-$790)
Hupmobile Model 20 ($750-$750)
Zimmerman Model H ($650-$650)

 
Brush: 1900-1910
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