1948 Chrysler Town and Country news, pictures, specifications, and information
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chrysler introduced the Town and Country line for their post-war selection, featuring sedans and convertibles. This body style was the most memorable of all the Chryslers with its name coming from the combination of the steel front end representing 'Town' and the wood paneled rear portion resembling 'Country.'

The convertible was the most favored of the Town and Country line with 8,368 sold. In 1948, the price tag showed $3,395. The body was framed with white ash (adding structural rigidity to the doors and deck lid), fitted with interlocking miters, and varnished to perfection. Mahogany veneer plywood filled the spaces within the framing. The Town and Country convertible was built on a C-39 chassis with 127.5 inch wheelbase. It featured a Spitfire Straight Eight, 323.5 cubic-inch engine developing 135 horsepower coupled to a fluid drive transmission.

The present owner purchased this convertible from T&C Collector Lloyd Mayers of Las Vegas. It is Meadow Green with the rare Highlander plaid interior.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
There were 2,936 of these cars built in 1948, with 194 still in existence. The original selling price was $3,420. The car is equipped with an eight-cylinder engine, generating 135 horsepower.

The car retains all its original wood components. It has a new interior, plaid woven from original material from Scotland. The leather material is also from Scotland. It has the original, complete set of tools, dual fog lights, dual heaters and all systems are functional.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7407068
Sold for $198,000 at 2006 Gooding & Company.
At the conclusion of the Second World War, the automobile manufacturers of the world ceased production of military items and resumed the production of the automobile. Production was resumed at a furious pace as each company tried to emerge as the vehicle of choice and secure their position in the marketplace. Chrysler's Town & Country automobile was rather ingenious; with some material, such as steel, in short supply, Chrysler distanced their product with some readily available materials such as white ash and mahogany wood panels. The result was exciting and well received by the public.

This 1948 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible is powered by a L-head eight-cylinder engine that produces about 133 horsepower. It is a Fluid Drive semi-automatic transmission and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes.

It has been treated to a comprehensive and thorough restoration and is finished in the correct Newport Blue paint and tan fabric top. It was shown at the 2001 Meadow Brook Concours d'Elegance.

It was offered for sale at the 2006 Gooding & Company Auction held in Pebble Beach, Ca where it was estimated to sell for $200,000-$275,000. A reserve was place on the vehicle and bidding fell just short of the estimated value. Still, the car was sold for $198,000.

By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2012
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Walter P. Chrysler founded his car company on June 6, 1925, when the Maxwell Motor Company was re-organized into the Chrysler Corporation. Walter Chrysler had originally arrived at the Maxwell-Chalmers company in the early 1920's, having been hired to make over and fix the company's troubled operations (after having done a similar rescue at the Willys car company).

Chrysler Corporation then acquired Dodge, in 1928 and subsequently launched its Plymouth, a strong competitor in the low-price field, and the mid-market DeSoto. The Chrysler car was the top-of-the-line offering of the Chrysler Corp.

In 1941, Chrysler released the first Town & Country wood-bodied model, a station wagon with an unusual 'barrel-back' body design. This style was continued for 1942, when WWII ended auto production for four model years. When Chrysler returned to building automobiles, there were two new Town & Country models that replaced the wagon - a convertible and a 4-door sedan. Both were very prestigious and highly coveted cars and they continued to be produced with a few changes into 1948. The final wood-bodied Town & Country, a 'Newport' 2-door hardtop, was offered in 1950.

This spectacular 1948 Chrysler Town & Country four-door is powered by an L-head 6-cylinder engine rated at 114 horsepower. It has a Fluid Drive semi-automatic transmission and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes.
Windsor Series Sedan
Prior to World War II, 'woodies' were primarily relegated to station wagon body styles. Although Chrysler waited until 1949 to introduce their first all-new postwar model, they made a real styling statement in 1946 by producing wood bodied Town and Countries in sedan and convertible body styles. These Ash and Mahogany rolling sculptures have attained iconic status.

The outstanding example displayed here was owned by a single family until 2001. It features a wonderful Highlander Plaid interior and is powered by its original 250 cubic-inch, six-cylinder engine. It was sold new in Denver but eventually ended up in Toronto, Ontario, where it was acquired by the current owner, who performed the restoration work.

The car's exterior wood was stripped and finished and new mahogany panels installed. The car was repainted in its original color - Catalina Tan. The interior was re-done in the optional Highlander Plaid and chrome was re-done as needed.

The car's woodwork was originally installed by the Pekin Woodworks of West Helena, Arkansas. The doors, rear quarters, and trunk are ash with mahogany panels. They are structural - not decorative.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7405530
Sold for $130,000 at 2007 RM Auctions.
Sold for $148,500 at 2009 RM Auctions.
This 1948 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible was offered for sale at the 2007 RM Auction held in Amelia Island, Florida where it was estimated to sell for $140,000 - $180,000. It is powered by a 323.5 cubic-inch eight-cylinder engine capable of producing 135 horsepower. There is a Fluid Drive automatic gearbox and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes.

This Newport Blue Town & Country Convertible is the former property of the Collection of Lloyd Mayes, a noted enthusiast and collector. The interior is finished in Highlander Blue Plaid. It is believed to be in excellent mechanical and cosmetic condition.

At auction, the car found a new owner, selling for $130,000.

By Daniel Vaughan | Mar 2007
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7406930
When automobile production resume in the post-War era, most of the vehicles were basically mildly-face lifted versions of the cars that were being built when production had ceased. The New York was one of those cars; it was basically a pre-War car except for the front sheet metal, which now had fade-away front fenders. The top-of-the-line New Yorker was the Town & Country sedan and convertible coupe.

The Town & Country was conceived by Chrysler employee Dave Wallace in 1941 and was only available as a four-door vehicle with a wooden body. It was an inexpensive estate wagon that used ash and mahogany for its body frame. The bodystyle would soon become popular and associated with the wealthy.

The convertible version cost a hefty $3,400 and was the most expensive Chrysler model available. In total, around 8,400 examples were built.

This example is fitted with the desirable optional Comfort Master heater unit. It is a past AACA National winner with much of its body, paint and chrome in excellent condition. In 2008, it was offered for sale at the Hilton Head Sports & Classic Car Auction presented by Worldwide Auctioneers where it was estimated to sell for $140,000 - $160,000. As bidding came to a close, the lot was left unsold as its reserve had not been satisfied.

By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2008
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7405374
Engine Num: C39-49666
Sold for $143,000 at 2011 Gooding & Company.
There were approximately 2,936 Town & Country cars produced in 1948. It is believed that only 200 remain in existence. This car has been given a restoration and is finished in Catalina Tan paint, red leather and taupe Bedford Cord interior, and a taupe top. There is white ash wood framework with mahogany panels.

In 2009, this T&C Convertible was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction in Scottsdale, Arizona. The car was estimated to sell for $150,000 - $200,000. The lot was sold for a high bid of $125,000, including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2009
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chrysler introduced the Town & Country convertible in 1946 and sold over 8,000 of these cars before production ended in 1948. The Town & Country was powered by an 8-cylidner L head engine producing 113 bhp and built on the C-39 chassis. The body was framed in ash for extra strength and the mahogany veneer was beautifully varnished. The price in 1948 was $3,395.

This particular Town & Country has just over 12,000 miles from new and is completely original. It was maintained for most of its recent life by Chrysler woody collector Roy Bleeke of Wayne, Indiana.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: C3969438
Sold for $162,250 at 2008 RM Auctions.
The Town & Country Convertible sold for $3,400 in 1948, making it the most expensive model available. Around 8,400 buyers would select this vehicle and are highly sought after by collectors in modern times.

This convertible has been given a frame-up restoration and meticulously maintained in a climate-controlled area. It has not been shown or judged. It is painted in green with a green convertible power top. The factory-correct upholstery is in Bedford cord. There is an L-head eight-cylinder engine, Fluid-Drive transmission, two heaters, and a radio.

In 2008 this 1948 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible was brought to RM Auctions' Vintage Motor Cars of Meadow Brook. It was estimated to sell for $135,000-$175,000. A high bid of $162,250, including buyer's premium, was enough to secure new ownership. The lot was sold.

By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2008
New Yorker Series Hardtop
Chassis Num: S71003849
Sold for $93,500 at 2008 RM Auctions.
This Town & Country Sedan has been in the same single family ownership since new. It has been stored on blocks in a heated garage since 1953. The odometer reads just 39,000 original miles and was given a mechanical service around the early 1970s. It has been used sparingly.

The car is painted in factory Royal Blue with unrestored wood framing and panels. It is well equipped with twin spotlights, sun visors, a factory radio, and clock.

Estimated to sell for $95,000 - $125,000 at RM Auction's 'Vintage Motor Cars of Meadow Brook', this vehicle found a new owner for the sum of $93,500 including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Sep 2008
Windsor Series Sedan
Virtually unchanged during its first three years of production, the expensive Town and Country convertible attracted 8,368 buyers between 1946 and 1948. This example was specially constructed for actor Leo Carrillo, better know as Poncho from The Cicso Kid television show. Custom touches included a hood-mounted steer head with eyes that light, extended bumper guards, specially mixed paint to match the color of Carrillo's palomino pony, and hand painted 'LC' monograms on the doors and wheel covers. Carrillo drove this car frequently in parades and to publicity events. A second hood without a steer head was also supplied with the car.

Collection of Michael Quinn
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7404463
Sold for $115,500 at 2009 RM Auctions.
The odometer on this Convertible shows 82,840 miles and the car wears a restoration that was completed in the late 1990s. Period accessories include dual spotlights and amber fog lights.

In 2009, this Town & Country was offered for sale at the Vintage Motor Cars of Hershey presented by RM Auctions where it was estimated to sell for $125,000 - $175,000. The lot was sold for the sum of $115,500, including buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2009
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7405394
Engine Num: C39-49961
Sold for $220,000 at 2009 Gooding & Company.
This Town & Country Convertible was formerly the property of Roy Bleeke. It is an amazingly original car and spent over three decades in the Roy Bleeke Collection. It has an extensive documented history and has only 7,200 miles from new.

In 2009, the car was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction held at Pebble Beach, CA. It was expected to sell for $225,000 - $300,000 and offered without reserve. The lot was sold for the sum of $220,000, inclusive of buyer's premium.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2010
Windsor Series Sedan
Chassis Num: 71003496
Sold for $66,000 at 2011 Gooding & Company.
This Chrysler Town and Country was one of the last examples built. It was first titled in Pennsylvania on June 22nd of 1949. Currently, the car has just 27,790 miles and is finished in Dove Gray paint. It is outfitted with a wood and chrome roof rack, as well as a driver's side, cowl-mounted spotlight. Inside, there is the original maroon cloth trimmed with light gray leather upholstery, carpets and factory-delivered finished.

In 2011, this vehicle was offered for sale at the Gooding & Company auction held in Amelia Island, Florida. It was estimated to sell for $90,000 - $120,000 and offered without reserve. As bidding came to a close, the car had been sold for the sum of $66,000.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
The Chrysler Town and Country is a maddening car to maintain. Not because of the mechanics, which were reliable and well built, but simply because of the wonderful combinations of wood and steel, topped by a canvas roof and decorated with lots of chrome.

This 1948 Town & Country was built on Chrysler's New Yorker chassis which had a 127.5-inch wheelbase chassis and was powered by Chrysler's 323.5 cubic-inch inline eight that developed 135 horsepower.

The current owner of this example is only the third owner. The first two owners were doctors in his neighborhood of Cleveland Heights, Ohio. He purchased it in August of 1962, after completing his freshman year of college. It was used as his wedding transportation six years later. And all three, bride, groom and Town and Country are still together, 45 years later.

Restoration began in the 1980s; it was interrupted and resumed in 2007, and finally completed in 2010.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7408375
Sold for $154,000 at 2008 RM Auctions.
This 1948 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible Coupe wears an older, high-quality restoration which still shows well in modern times. It is painted in the factory correct Noel Green and has a newer tan convertible top, chrome, and wooden bodywork. There are dual side-view mirrors, dual spotlights, front and rear bumper guards, and period correct wide whitewall tires mounted on steel wheels.

The interior of this car is green leather and Bedford cord upholstery with tan Wilton wool carpeting. It was well equipped with AM radio, a clock and a heater. There is a three spoke steering wheel and the original 'Spitfire' eight-cylinder engine mated to a Fluid-Drive transmission.

In 2008, this car was brought to the 2nd Annual Vintage Motor Cars of Hershey presented by RM Auctions where it was estimated to sell for $120,000-$160,000. Those estimates were proven accurate as a high bid of $154,000 including buyer's premium was enough to secure new ownership. The lot was sold.
Windsor Series Sedan
Chassis Num: C38152342
High bid of $40,000 at 2014 Mecum. (did not sell)
Sold for $61,000 at 2014 Mecum.
In 1948, Chrysler built 2,936 examples of the Town & Country, with approximately 194 examples still in existence. This 1948 sedan is finished in Metallic Green with a Green plaid fabric-on-vinyl bench seat interior. This Windsor model has a Sportsman interior, original wood, radio and clock, heater and defrost, luggage rack, twin spotlight, twin fog lights, Firestone wide whitewall tires, and front and rear bumper guards.
By Daniel Vaughan | Dec 2014
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Leo Carrillo knew how to get your attention. If that meant riding in a parade on the bull he mounted to the front of his car that was fine. After an active Hollywood career of parades and movie openings carrying its famous cowboy owner, the Leo Carrillo Town & Country was retired to the Harrah Collection in Reno, Nevada. It was on display there for many years. Upon Mr. Harrah's death, the car was sold to the Imperial Palace in Las Vegas. Then it was restored by the inmates of the Nevada State Prison system. To this day, the car shows almost no signs of aging, a testament to the quality of work provided by the prison program. The car has since been owned by two Town and Country enthusiasts. The current owner acquired the car in 2012.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
The Chrysler Town and Country was one of the most exciting postwar cars produced. A favorite of celebrities, personalities and the rich and famous made the first choice of the Hollywood crown. The convertible was the most favored with 8,368 produced and possibly fewer than 200 remaining today. The body style was the most memorable of all the Chryslers with its name coming from the combination of the steel front end representing 'Town' and the wood panels rear portion resembling 'Country.' The body is framed with white ash, fitted with interlocking miters, and varnished to perfection. Mahogany veneer plywood filled the spaces within the framing. It is powered by a Spitfire Straight Eight, 323.5 cubic-inch engine developing 135 horsepower coupled to a unique fluid drive semi-automatic transmission.
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Back in the day, Wood station wagons were very popular as depot hacks and were commonly used to pick-up guests from the railway station, whisking them and their luggage to hotels and resorts.

After World War II, the Town & Country nameplate returned, but the station wagon body did not. Instead, upscale Town & Country sedans and convertibles were produced from 1946 to 1950 in higher numbers than the prewar wagon. One claim to fame is the fact that the first-ever two-door 'hardtop convertible coupes' were 1948 New York Town & Country cars (total production: 7).

The Town & Country was framed with white ash, fitted with interlocking miters, then varnished to perfection. Mahogany veneer plywood filled the spaces within the framing. These are some of the most memorable Chryslers, and the convertible was the most favored. It featured a Spitfire Straight Eight, 323.5 cubic-inch engine developing 135 horsepower coupled to a fluid drive transmission. Factory prices are variously listed from $3,123 to $3,420, probably due to post-war inflation taking its toll.

Nevertheless, the Cadillac-level price tag made it a vehicle worthy of a number of Hollywood silver screen personalities including Bob Hope, Wallace Beerie, Barbara Stanwyck and Clark Gable, who had two (one for town and one for country).
New Yorker Series Convertible Coupe
Chassis Num: 7404999
Sold for $99,000 at 2017 Gooding & Company.
This Chrysler Town and Country Convertible is finished in Noel Green Metallic with a two-tone cream interior and tan convertible top accented with brown piping. It was given a high-quality restoration in the early 2000s. It is well-equipped with a radio, heater, amber driving lights, and dual spotlights, it has been driven about 100 miles since the restoration's completion.
By Daniel Vaughan | Apr 2017
Produced only from 1941 through 1950, the first woodie wagon with an all-steel roof was designated the Town & Country. This 4-door sedan luxury vehicle was built for either city or estate transportation, and was available for 6 or 9 passenger versions.

Due to World War II, production of the Town & Country was halted in December, 1941. A mere 1,000 models were produced during 1941 and 1942. In 1942 the sheet metal was updated, and the design of woodie remained similar to its previous look.

Following the war, the new wave of Town & Country woodies were produced in much larger numbers as coupes, convertibles, sedans. The first production hardtops ever produced by any manufacture, seven 2-door hardtops were also manufactured by Chrysler. The final Town & Country woodie models were produced only as 2-door hardtops only for the last year.

In the last year of its production, a box type woodie station wagon was offered by both Chrysler and Desoto. Plymouth and Dodge also released box type woodie wagon throughout the 1930's and 1940's. In 1950, production of the original Town & Country was ended.

By Jessica Donaldson
 
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