1952 Crosley Series CD

1952 Crosley Series CD 1952 Crosley Series CD
Super Station Wagon
Powel Crosley, a manufacturer of radio's and refrigerators, began manufacturing automobiles in 1940. The Crosley cars were tiny, quirky and advertised as 'America's most needed car.' By the early 1950s, sales were slow. The last Crosley line was introduced in 1951 and would remain essentially unchanged until production ended in July of 1952. On March 28th of 1953, Crosley Motors merged with Aerojet Engineering Company of Azusa, California, both companies being members of the General Tire and Rubber Company.

This Series CD Super is one of 1355 station wagons produced in 1952. It has an 80-inch wheelbase and weighs just 1,480 pounds. The 44 cubic-inch engine produces 25.5 horsepower.


By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2010
The diminutive Crosley was constructed in Cincinnati, Ohio from 1939 through 1952. This would mark as the last of the American attempts to mass produce a microcar. Among the highlights of Crosley Motors were the first fleetside, full bed-pickup in 1947, first disc brakes on American car (1949), and the winner of the first Sebring race, using the European handicap system in 1950. In 1948, the built more station wagons than any other United States automakers.

Crosley introduced its restyled cars in November of 1948 and featured new front-end sheet metal. They were available as a Deluxe Sedan, Convertible and a Station Wagon with prices beginning in the mid $800s. Production never reached high numbers; the first year alone saw a mere 6,679 examples constructed.

On the front of the CD was a Crosley shield medallion with a new type of hood mascot. The wheel openings were reshaped, the front fenders had a new revised shape with the headlights integrated into the front end, and the hood became broader. The license plate holder was moved from the left-hand side to the center of the deck lid.

Though little changed for the 1950 model year, the Crosley Series CD was available as a Standard or Super model, still available as a 2-door sedan, station wagon, or convertible. Powering the car was a four-cylinder engine that displaced 44 cubic-inches and produced 26.5 horsepower. It had a three-speed non-synchromesh manual transmission. The wheelbase measured 80 inches.

On July 3rd of 1952, production of the Crosley Series CD ceased.


By Daniel Vaughan | Jul 2011



Recent Vehicle Additions

Performance and Specification Comparison

Price Comparison

1952 Series CD
$255-$17,350
1952 Crosley Series CD Base Price : $255

Model Year Production

#1#2#3Crosley
1957Ford (1,676,449)Chevrolet (1,505,910)Plymouth (726,009)
1956Chevrolet (1,567,117)Ford (1,408,478)Buick (572,024)
1955Chevrolet (1,704,667)Ford (1,451,157)Buick (738,814)
1954Ford (1,165,942)Chevrolet (1,143,561)Plymouth (463,148)
1953Chevrolet (1,346,475)Ford (1,247,542)Plymouth (650,451)
1952Chevrolet (818,142)Ford (671,733)Plymouth (396,000)6,614
1951Chevrolet (1,229,986)Ford (1,013,381)Plymouth (611,000)6,614
1950Chevrolet (1,498,590)Ford (1,208,912)Plymouth (610,954)6,792
1949Ford (1,118,308)Chevrolet (1,010,013)Plymouth (520,385)7,431
1948Chevrolet (696,449)Ford (430,198)Plymouth (412,540)26,239
1947Chevrolet (671,546)Ford (429,674)Plymouth (382,290)19,344

Related Automotive News

© 1998-2020. All rights reserved. The material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Vehicle information, history, and specifications from concept to production.

Follow ConceptCarz on Facebook Follow ConceptCarz on Twitter RSS News Feed

Conceptcarz.com
© 1998-2020 Conceptcarz.com Reproduction or reuse prohibited without written consent.