1965 Chevrolet Series C10

1965 Chevrolet Series C10 1965 Chevrolet Series C10 1965 Chevrolet Series C10 1/2 Ton Pickup
Chassis #: C144S5149674
Sold for $13,500 at 2015 Mecum : Monterey.
This V8-powered Chevy C10 Pickup is a Big Window Custom Cab with a rare automatic transmission, power brakes, and power steering. It was given a restoration in 2010 and features fresh chrome bumpers and side moldings, clean interior, and new wiring.
By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2016
The Chevrolet C/K Series was Chevy and GMC's full-size pickup from 1960 through 1999 in the United States. (From 1965 to 1999 Canada, from 1964 through 2001 in Brazil, and from 1975 to 1982 in Chile). The 'C' indicated two-wheel drive while the 'K' meant four-wheel drive.

In 1999, the C/K light-duty pickup truck was replaced by the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra in the United States and Canada.

Chevrolet C10
In 1960, Chevrolet introduced a new body style of light pickup-truck that featured a drop-center ladder frame, allowing the cab to sit lower. In the front was an independent suspension setup. The old naming scheme, the 3100, 3200, and 3600 designations were replaced by the 10, 20 and 30. The 3100, 3200, and 3600 had been used for short 1/2, long 1/2 and 3/4-ton models (respectively).

Beginning in 1957, the trucks were available from the factory with a four-wheel drive system. The 'C' in front of the series number indicated 2-wheel drive while a 'K' represented 4-wheel drive. GMC did not use the 'C' nomenclature, though their 4x4 versions had the 'K' designation. Half-ton models were the C10 and K10 short-bed trucks, and C16 and K15 long-bed trucks. The 3/4-ton models were the C20 and K20, as well as the one-tone C30.

Beginning in 1960, the C/K trucks were available as 'Fleetside' or fendered 'Stepside' versions. GMC called these 'Wideside' and 'Fenderside.'

The 1962 versions were given a torsion bar suspension in the front, with trailing arm setup in the rear. Engines included the base GMC 305 cubic-inch V6 for the GMC version, delivering 135 horsepower. Inline-six engines included a 230, 236, 250, 261, and 292. V8 options included the 283 and 327. A three-speed synchromesh was standard, with a four-speed synchro and two-speed Powerglide available as optional equipment.

In 1963, a coil-spring front suspension setup became available, along with a base engine change. The new inline-6 3.8 liter engine delivered 140 horsepower. An optional 4.8 liter inline six, with 165 horsepower on tap, also was introduced.

In 1964, the cab was updated and the 'warparound' windshield was removed. A new front grille design appeared on the front, along with various other interior changes.

In 1965, air conditioning and a 327 cubic-inch V8 engine became available. In 1966, a new base engine was introduced - an inline-6 4.1 liter version delivering 155 horsepower.

The second generation of trucks was introduced in 1967 and would remain in production until 1972. It was given the nickname 'Action Line.' Most of the trucks built during this period were given a coil spring trailing arm rear suspension, greatly improving the ride over the traditional leaf springs. Those wanting the leaf springs could order that as an option. Leaf springs were standard on 30 series trucks.


By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2012

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