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1939 8C 2900B Image Right
 

1938 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 Mille Miglia news, pictures, specifications, and information

Roadster
Coachwork: Farina
 
This Alfa is believed to be one of the prototypes for the 1938 Mille Miglia. The car was owned in 1938 by the famous Italian racing champion Giuseppe Farina. The coachwork was made by Stablimenti Farina of Torino, Italy. This is the only example of a 2.9 Alfa with Stablimenti Farina coachwork.

The 2.9 liter Alfas, with a top speed of 109 miles per hour, were the fastest sports cars built before the Second World War. There were fewer than forty 2.9 Alfas built. This particular car has all the original parts, chassis, engine and body.
Touring Spyder
Coachwork: Touring
Chassis Num: 412030
 
Four 8C-2900 team cars were built by Alfa and Carrozzeria Touring for the 1938 Mille Miglia. Alfa dominated the race, and this car, driven by Carlo Pintacuda, led for most of the thousand-mile contest. At the last checkpoint, a brake problem sidelined it for 14-minutes, causing it to finish second by a mere two minutes. The car was later bought from Alfa Corse by Count Felice Trossi, and in the 1940s it came to the US in the ownership of Tommy Lee, who raced it at Pikes Peak and Watkins Glen. A young mechanic by the name of Phil Hill bought the car from the Lee estate and he drove it to victory at Pebble Beach, winning the Del Monte Cup in 1951. Ralph Lauren purchased the car in 2004. After restoration by Paul Russell and Company, returning the car to its Mille Miglia configuration, it was featured in an exhibit in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston called 'Speed, Style and Beauty; Cars from the Ralph Lauren Collection.'
Touring Spyder
Coachwork: Touring
 
This 1938 Alfa Romeo 2900B MM is one of four created by Alfa Romeo to compete in the 1938 Mille Miglia race. It was powered by an engine that produced an impressive 255 horsepower and fitted into an advanced chassis that featured an independent adjustable suspension.

This is the actual car that won the 1938 Mille Miglia race. It was driven by Clemente Biondetti, an individual who would have a very distinguished racing career, winning the World Formula One Championship in 1950 driving a Ferrari 166S. He won the Mille Miglia in 1938, and 1947-1949. He won the Targa Florio on two occasions, 1948 and 1949.

This current resting place for this car is the Simone Foundation Museum located in Philadelphia, PA.

By Daniel Vaughan | Jul 2008
Vittorio Jano was responsible for the design of the magnificent engineering marvel, the 8C 2300. The name was formed by following Alfa Romeo's naming convention; the 8C represented the eight cylinder engine while the 2300 represented the cubic-capacity. The engine is comprised of two four-cylinder engine with the cylinders aligned in a row. Central gearing drives the overhead twin camshafts. A Roots-type supercharger was used to force air to the carburetor aiding in the production of 140 horsepower. Further modifications to the OHV engine increased the horsepower output to nearly 180.

The first 8C 2300 made an appearance in prototype form at the 1931 Mille Miglia. Two Grand Prix 8C 2300 models were later entered in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza where they finished first and second. In honor of this achievement, Alfa Romeo used the name 'Monza' on all their 8C 2300 Grand Prix vehicles. In 1932 the 8C 2300 became a dominant force, winning at Targa Florio followed by three consecutive victories at Le Mans. It was undefeated at the Grand Prix circuit, defeating the powerful Mercedes SSK and SSKL models and brining an end to their dominance. It achieved many prestigious victories such as the Spa 24 Hours and the Monaco Grand Prix and more. Compliments of the vehicles capabilities and durability.

The 8C 2300 was available in a wide variety of body styles including short and long wheel-based chassis. The long wheelbase was dubbed 'Lungo' while the short-wheelbase were 'Corto'. The Lungo models were suitable for traveling on the open roads at high speeds while the Corto models were smaller, lighter, and more agile, suitable for racing, many being prepared by Scuderia Ferrari. The Lungo series produced 140 horsepower with a 4.25 final drive. The Spider Corsas often featured a 165 horsepower engine built specifically to satisfy customer specifications. A 3.76:1 or 4.08:1 final drive was left to the customer to select.

As was customary at the time, many of the automobiles were supplied to custom coachbuilders such as Pininfarina, Figoni, Touring, Castagna, and Zagato. The results were uniquely designed and eloquently outfitted automobiles that were as much works of art as they were high performance machines.

The 8C 2300 was produced from 1931 through 1933. During their production life span only 188 examples were produced. By today's standards, many 8C 2300 models easily sell for over a million dollars.

8C 35
The Alfa Romeo 8C-35 was a Scuderia Ferrari works car which raced at Monza, Modena, Nurburgring, Lucca, Monaco and more. They were driven by famous drivers such as Dreyfus, Farina, Brivio, and Nuvolari.

One of the most historical races for the 8C-35 was at Coppa Cieno. Nuvolari's Alfa Romeo Tipo C 12C-36 suffered a broken transaxle after only two laps. He ran to the pits and got into an 8C-35. By the time Nuvolari re-entered the race, he was already seven laps down. By the time the race concluded, Nuvolari was in first place.

8C 2900
The 8C 2900 was built in two series, the 2900A and the 2900B. The 8C represented the engine size, a straight eight powerplant while the 2900 represented the size of the engine, 2905 cc. The engine was created by mounting two four-cylinder alloy blocks on a single crankcase. With the twin Roots-type superchargers attached, the 2.9-liter engine could produce between 180 hp for the 8C 2900B and 220 hp for the 8C 2900A. The suspension was all-independent with wishbones in the front and the rear had swing-axles.

The Alfa Romeo 8C 2900A was a two-seater with Grand Prix style bodywork. They were purpose-built to race and win at Italy's famous Mille Miglia. In 1936, three examples were entered and were able to capture a first through third finish. A year later, they repeated their success again capturing the top three places. The success of the 2900A spawned the decision to create a road-going version that Alfa Romeo could supply to its customers. The 8C 2900B models were built upon two different wheelbases and had bodies that were very aerodynamic. Similar to the 2900A mechanically, the 2900B models were given a de-tuned engine that produced 40 horsepower less than the 2900A but still fast enough to be claimed the fastest production vehicle in the world with a top speed of nearly 110 mph. The Corto were short 2800mm wheelbase version while the Lungo were the long 3000 mm wheelbase versions. As was customary at the time, custom coachbuilders were often tasked with building the bodies. The 2900B had most of its coachwork handled by Touring of Italy. The vehicles could be purchased in Berlinetta, Roadster or Spyder bodies. These supercars were not only fast but they were expensive too. Since they were mechanically capable to match most vehicles on the racing circuit, many of the 2900B models were raced. Alfa Romeo constructed 13 examples of the 8C 2900B but with the 220 hp engine and most with Roadster bodies. In 1938 and in 1947, the 2900B with the 220 hp engine were able to capture the checkered flag at the Mille Miglia.

During its production lifespan, only 41 examples were produced. Three wee type 8C 2900 A with the remaining being the type B.

8C 2900B Spyder
Evolving from the successful 1936 8C 2900A, the 2900B is the highly cultured son of the grand champion athlete. Hidden under the long and graceful hood lives an engine with a racing heritage. The 2900 cc straight eight cylinder supercharged masterpiece features dual camshafts, dual magnetos and dry sump oiling. Despite reduced compression compared to 2900A, it still produces an astounding 180 horsepower, delivered through a four-speed gearbox.

Two of Italy's finest designers provided appropriate coachwork for the 2900B, Carrozzeria Touring and Stabilimenti Farina. Only thirty examples were produced and each is somewhat unique.

By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2006
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Arna
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Giulia
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Junior Zagato
Milano
Montreal
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Sport Sedan
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Tipo 158 Alfetta
Tipo 33
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1939 8C 2900B Image Right
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