1962 Volkswagen Transporter

1962 Volkswagen Transporter 1962 Volkswagen Transporter 1962 Volkswagen Transporter
Station Wagon
Chassis #: 952150
Sold for $110,000 at 2015 RM Auctions - Automobiles of Arizona.
Volkswagen introduced their Transporter at the 1949 Geneva Auto Show. Production continued for a rather long time, continuing in Brazil through December of 2013, by which point more than nine million examples had been produced. In Germany, they were known as the Bulli and were produced in air-cooled, and later water-cooled, wasserbus variations, prior to the arrival of the front-engine Eurovan in 1993.

The first generation of the Transporter was produced from 1950 through 1967 and was first sold in the U.S. in 1952. This early Transporter was known as the 'split-window' for its two-piece windshield. Power was from a 1,131 cubic-centimeter engine offering 25 horsepower. In 1953, a larger 1192cc version was introduced, which - by 1959 - had grown to displace 1285cc and offered 40 horsepower. That year, a full synchromesh gearbox became available. By 1962, the one-millionth Transporter example had been produced.

The Volkswagen Type 2 were versatile vehicles and used as ambulances, police cars, fire trucks, campers, railroad speedsters, hearses, and crane trucks. Buyers could order the vehicle with doors on one or both sides, with the panel van offering as many as nine doors, making it easier to load and unload materials in narrow streets.

In 1952, a Volkswagen Pickup arrived, and crew-cabs with a shorter five-foot bed arrived in 1957. In 1961, the Volkswagen Microbus was introduced, and was one of the earliest vehicles to be offered as a camper from the factory. The conversion from microbus to camper was performed by Westfalia-Werke, which became known as simply the 'Westfalia.' They came equipped with two upholstered bench seats that converted into a bed, a front seat that could sleep children, storage space, a wardrobe, and a tent to increase the living area. The Westfalia, known as the SO, for sonderausfuhrungen (special equipment), made the Microbus a suitable vehicle for camping and long trips. Two models were available through 1965, the SO-34 and the SO-35. The SO-34 has a laminated white interior, while the SO-35 featured finished wood.

This particular vehicle is a SO-35 Westfalia Camper. It has birch plywood interior panels and cabinetry, a laminated folding table, and bright plaid canvas seats with matching yellow curtains. This Camper also included a child's hammock and a factory accessory awning. Optional equipment includes a hatch-top roof, opening front 'safari' windows, and a luggage rack for extra baggage.

This Camper have been treated to a no-expense-spared restoration. It has a four-speed manual transmission, a factory Blaupunkt radio, an original luggage rack, a sub-hatch roof, plaid rear seats, wood cabinetry, a factory-optional tent, a table, and vast storage space. It is finished in Blue White and Turquoise two-tone paint and has been driven just 2,534 miles since the restoration was completed.


By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2015
1962 Volkswagen Transporter
DeLuxe Wagon
The base T1 generation, Typ 2 Transporter Microbus or Kombi is the 11-window (sometimes known as the 3-window because of its three side windows). The DeLuxe shows 15 windows while the Sunroof Deluxe - this example, runs out at 23-windows, as follows; the split windshield counting as one, two front cabin door, one rear, eight rear side and two rear corner, plus eight skylight windows. Post 1964 there were 13- and 21-window versions.

German production stopped in 1967. The 1962 models still used the Beetle's 1192cc air-cooled, flat-four motor with about 30 horsepower in a 2400mm wheelbase ladder frame-based unibody.


By Daniel Vaughan | Jun 2015
After World War II, Volkswagen has created a Van/Camper that has assumed many names and been produced in many markets for many markets. Names such as the Eurovan, Microbus, Westfalia Camper, Panel Van, Kombi, Samba, Pick-up, Westy, Multivan, Weekender, Splittie, 11-window, 13-window, 15-window,21-window, 23-window, Breadloaf, Bay-Window, Vanagon, VW Bus, Bully, and the list continues. During the years there has been much experimentation with this vehicle to include truck beds, campers, transporters, and more. This vehicle, in all its many facets, has had a sympathetic fallowing since its inception and has become a counterculture symbol for many generations. Its utilitarian shape has made it suitable for many scenarios and its low cost has made it economically viable.

The Volkswagen Type 2 Van was introduced in 1950 and was the second production line of vehicles introduced by Volkswagen. The first model was the Type 1 Beetle. The idea for the Type 2 came from the Dutch VW importer named Ben Pon who created the designs in 1947. Many of the aerodynamic short-comings were resolved in a wind tunnel at the Technical University of Braunschweig. Three years later, the Type 2 began leaving the Wolfsburg factory.

The Type 2 was produced from March 8th of 1950 through 2002 with many variations along the way. There were versions of the Type 2 constructed, such as the T1, T2, and T3, to name a few. This is where things get a little confusing. The Type 2 T1 was produced from 1950 through 1967 and was replaced by the Type 2 T2 which began producing in 1968 and continued in production until 1979. Production in Mexico continued in 1980 of the T2, and later in Brazil in 1996. Versions produced prior to 1971 are referred to as the T2a while those produced after 1972 are labeled T2b. The Type 2 T3 was introduced in 1979 and produced until 1991. There are many exceptions within these naming schemes with many alternate names.

The Type 2 served many functions and could be purchased from the Volkswagen dealers as a refrigerated van, hearses, ambulances, police vans, fire engines, and ladder trucks. Camping versions were available through Westfalia, the official name is Westfalia-Werke Wieddndruck. Volkswagen commissioned Westfalia to construct Camper cars in the early 1950s and has remained in production until 2003. Other coachbuilders created camper versions of the Type 2 such as Dormobile, VW Riviera, and VW Sun-Dial.

Westfalia Camper
From 1951 through 1958, Westfalia created around 1000 Camper Box conversions. Following 1958, the SO models were introduced. SO was short for sonderausfuhrungen, meaning Special Model. Option packages were available on the SO models such as the SO-16, SO-23, SO-34, SO-35, SO-33, SO-42, SO-44 and SO-45. The SO-23 was produced from 1959 through 1961. The SO-34 and SO-35 were both available from 1961 through 1965. The SO-34 was a laminated white interior while the SO-35 was a finished wood interior.

Standard Equipment for the Westfalia Campers included electrical hookups, curtains, screened Jalousie Windows, laminated folding table, birch plywood interior panels, ice box or cold-box, and laminated cabinetry. Some models even came equipped with a sink as standard equipment. Optional was a pop-up top, tent, side awnings, camping stove, child sleeping cot, camping equipment, and portable chemical toilet, to name a few.

With many United States service men serving in Germany during the 1950 and 1960s, many were purchased and brought back to the United States.

In 1968 the Bay Window models were introduced which replaced the split-screen style.

Type 2 T1
The Volkswagen Type 2 T1 was the first generation of the split window bus. It is commonly known as the Splittie, Barndoor, Kombi, Bus, and the Microbus. Production began in early March of 1950 and lasted until 1967. From 1950 through 1956 it was produced in Wolfsburg. After 1956 it was produced in Hanover. Versions created until 1955 were known as the T1a. These versions are often called the 'Barndoor' versions due to their large rear engine cover. The T1b were produced from 1955 through 1963. These versions had a smaller engine cover and smaller, 15-inch wheels. The T1c was introduced in 1963 and produced until 1967. These versions had a wider rear door.

The standard bus had 11-windows. Deluxe models had 15-windows. The sunroof deluxe versions had eight skylight windows and are known as the 23-window. A 13-window and 21-window version were produced starting in 1963.

The Type 2 T1 was powered by an air-cooled four-cylinder boxer engine mounted in the rear of the vehicle. This made engine noise and fumes nearly non-existent for the driver and front passenger. The 1.2-liter unit produced a modest 25 horsepower and was capable of carrying the Microbus at highway speeds. Getting up to speed took a while and going uphill was sometimes a challenge. In 1955 the engine was modified to produce 36 horsepower and later increased 40 horsepower in 1959. The 40 hp unit proved to be unreliable so the factory issued a recall and replaced them with another 40 hp versions.

The T1 was produced in Germany until 1967. Brazil produced the T1 until 1975. The T1.5 was produced in Brazil from 1975 through 1996.

Type 2 T2
The T2 was the second generation of the Type 2 and introduced in 1968 and stayed in production in Germany until 1979. Mexican began production of the T2 in 1980 and Brazil in 1996. Type 2 vehicles produced before 1971 are known as the T2a with those produced after 1972 called the T2b.

The first visible change over the T1 was the removal of the split window in favor of a single piece of glass. This is the reason why the T2 is often called the Bay-window. The rear suspension was improved and the vehicle's weight increased. To help carry this extra load, Volkswagen powered the T2 with a 1.6-liter engine which produced 48-DIN. In 1972, larger engines were available in 1.7-liter and 2.0-liter sizes. To accommodate these larger power-plants, the engine bag grew in size, as did the cooling air inlets. These larger engines are commonly known as the Type 4 engine. The Type 4 engine had been designed for the Type 4 automobiles. Since the Type 2 used the Type 1 (Beetle) engine, there is no Type 2 or Type 3 engine. The Type 4 engine still did not produce an overwhelming amount of power but they were good for lots of low-end torque. They were also remarkably reliable and robust in comparison to the Type 1.

An automatic gearbox came available in 1973 but only with the Type 4 engine option. In 1974, the engine displacement of the Type 4 increased to 1.8-liter and produced 68-DIN. Horsepower in the 2.0-liter version increased in 1976 to 70-DIN.

Type 2 T3
The third distinct generation of the Type 2 was the T3 which was built from 1979 to 1991. In Britain and Ireland, these vehicles were known as the T25. In the United States, these were often called the Vanagon. The T3 had the same length and height as its predecessor but increased in width by 12cm. The overall weight of the vehicle once again increased. The big changes in this vehicle were the ones unseen. Most of the mechanical components were all-new, including the suspension. The rear door of the vehicle grew in size. Many changes were made to comply with increasing safety regulations such as increasing the front crash protection. The design changed as well, becoming more square in shape.

Initially, the same engines used to power the T2 was used to power the T3. It was not until 1981 that a water-cooled diesel engine became available as optional equipment. Three years later, option water-cooled gasoline boxer versions were used to replace the air-cooled ones. The T25 was available with a 1.6- or 2.0-liter air-cooled engine. A 1.9-liter water-cooled engine in various power outputs soon replaced the prior versions. A 2.1-liter unit with fuel-injection was offered as optional equipment for part of the production lifespan of the T25. Diesel and turbo-diesel options were also used.

The T3 Syncro was a full-time four-wheel-drive version of the T3. Power was sent to the front axle by a viscous coupling when required. Most US-spec vehicles were not outfitted with a front and rear pneumatically operated differential locks; most European versions did.

T4 Eurovan
The Eurovan was a big change in comparison to the vans produced in prior years. It had its engine mounted in the front; the first production front-engined van produced by Volkswagen. Some were sent to Winnebago Industries to be converted into Campers. Just as the Type 2, the Eurovan was offered in many different configurations such as the seven-passenger GLS, Weekender, Camper, high-roof panel van, and more. There were two-wheelbases available. With the engine mounted in the front, the TDI diesel engines with direct injection were able to be used to power the vehicle. This greatly increased the vehicles performance and put it on par with some other models available on the market.

The T4 was produced from 1990 through the early 2000s when they were replaced by the T5. This was only one major change during the production lifespan of the T4 which occurred in 1994 when the front end was re-shaped. This changed allowed the VR6 six-cylinder engine to be mounted in the engine bay. This move greatly improved the vehicles performance. Those vehicles that were given this re-shaping were called the T4b with the versions retaining the original look being dubbed the T4a.

T5
In 2003, the Volkswagen T5 Transporter entered the market but is not available to North American consumers.

Microbus Concept
In 2001, Volkswagen introduced the Microbus Concept at the North American International Auto Show. It was designed by the VW design studio in California and featured a design similar to the early Microbus vehicles, but with its engine neatly fitted in the front. This Volkswagen was successful worldwide and reached cult status, especially in the USA, with the name Microbus. This design study redefines this cult with an up-to-date expression of personality and freedom.

Production nearly commenced on the concept but was halted due to cost problems.


By Daniel Vaughan | Feb 2007

Concepts by Volkswagen

Similarly Sized Vehicles
from 1962

Similarly Priced Vehicles

Volkswagen Monthly Sales Volume

December 2019
27,877
November 2019
29,218
October 2019
28,072
September 2019
26,947
August 2019
35,412
July 2019
31,188
June 2019
31,725
May 2019
35,702
April 2019
31,309
March 2019
37,092
February 2019
25,706
January 2019
23,074
Additional Sales Volume Data


Recent Vehicle Additions

Performance and Specification Comparison

Price Comparison

1962 Transporter
$2,980-$16,700
1962 Volkswagen Transporter Price Range: $1,995 - $2,980

Model Year Production

#1#2#3Volkswagen
1967Chevrolet (2,206,639)Ford (1,730,224)Toyota (1,068,321)921,013
1966Ford (2,212,415)Chevrolet (2,206,639)Volkswagen (1,168,146)1,168,146
1965Chevrolet (2,375,118)Ford (2,170,795)Volkswagen (1,174,687)1,174,687
1964Chevrolet (2,318,619)Ford (1,594,053)Toyota (1,068,321)1,034,797
1963Chevrolet (2,237,201)Ford (1,525,404)Fiat (957,941)891,521
1962Chevrolet (2,061,677)Ford (1,476,031)Fiat (957,941)925,747
1961Ford (1,338,790)Chevrolet (1,318,014)Volkswagen (807,488)807,488
1960Chevrolet (1,653,168)Ford (1,439,370)Toyota (1,068,321)725,939
1959Chevrolet (1,462,140)Ford (1,450,953)Volkswagen (575,407)575,407
1958Chevrolet (1,142,460)Ford (987,945)Volkswagen (451,526)451,526
1957Ford (1,676,449)Chevrolet (1,505,910)Plymouth (726,009)380,561

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