1965 Ferrari 275 GTB news, pictures, specifications, and information
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 07093
Engine Num: 07093
Sold for $1,732,500 at 2016 RM Auctions.
The 275 GTB was Ferrari's first production car with four wheel independent suspension, and a 5-speed transaxle for improved weight distribution. A 3.3 liter V-12 producing 280 horsepower, 4 wheel disc brakes and a gorgeous Pinafarina body made this model an instant success.

This particular car is an early short nose version, with very low mileage. During a recent restoration by Andy Greene Sports & Vintage Race Cars LLC, it was discovered that the engine had never been apart since it left the factory forty years ago!

The mid 1950s ushered in the era of the dual purpose Ferrari. This was a vehicle that was suitable and capable of racing, but also docile enough to be driven on public roads. This trend continued into the 1960s, when cars like the 275 GTB/2 came to prominence.

Production began in 1964 with serial #06003. The 275 Model wears Pinin Farina-designed, Scaglietti-built coachwork. There are four variations of the model, depending on the length of the front of the coachwork and the number of engine camshafts. The GTB/2 is Ferrari's first attempt at employing four wheel independent suspension and a rear transaxle into a production car. All 235 built carried a 280 horsepower, 3.3 litre, twelve-cylinder engine.

The car shown, serial #07093, is a mostly original, low mileage, shortnose, two camshaft model. It was originally imported by Luigi Chinetti for Mark Hamilton of Cincinatti, Ohio in early 1965. The list price then was $11,250. It has recently been refinished in its original color of 'Argento Auteuil.'
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 06741
Pininfarina described the 275 GTB as being 'the heart of a lion in the shape of the wind.' This car is a short nose 275 GTB with chassis number 06741. It was sold in Italy in 1965 and remained in that country for a number of years. In 1988 it was offered for sale in Switzerland with both Belgian and Swiss papers.

In 1994 it was entered in the Tour de France Retrospective driven by Bernard/Mouton to finish 4th in class.

In 1995 it was purchased by Dieter Martin who brought the car to a track day at the Uwe Meissner Meeting at Nuerburgring.
In 2000 the car was sent to the United States where it was sold in the state of Arizona. Since new, it had retained low mileage and had been treated to a mechanical restoration and fresh paint.

In new owner completed the process of importation of the car into the United States. The owner commissioned a complete, ground up restoration in 2001.

The car is seen here at the 2007 Cavallino Classic where it was driven by Peter LeSaffre.
By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2007
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 07785
This short nose two cam was fully restored to factory specifications and finished in its original livery Burgundy/Tan. It won several awards including the 2001 FCA National Coppa GT, Coppa Bella Machina and Class Platinum. It also took 2001 Concorso Italiano Platinum award.
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 08343
The Ferrari 275 GTB made its debut at the 1964 Paris Auto Show and was hailed as one of the most beautiful Ferraris. The Berlinetta body was built by Scaglietti and was available in either aluminum or steel with aluminum panels. Many of these lightweight models were sold to privateer race teams.

This car, chassis number 08343, is one of the rare long wheelbase alloy-bodied 275 GTB/6C cars with a 3.3-liter V12 engine derived from the earlier 250 GTO. The 275 GTB was the last Ferrari Berlinetta fitted with a single-cam engine.
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 08055
Engine Num: 08055
Designed by Pininfarina and manufactured by Scaglietti, the 275 GTB is a true classic and is considered one of the finest Ferraris ever built. It combines the Ferrari racing pedigree with a new fully independent front and rear suspension to produce a comfortable grand tourer.

This long-nose 275 GTB features the desirable light-weight aluminum coachwork, an option available to performance-minded clients. The engine is based on the race-proven Colombo V12 of 3285cc with the standard triple Weber carburetor setup, giving around 300 bhp. It also has the rear-mounted 5-speed transaxle combining the all-synchromesh gearbox and differential, which gave a much better balance.
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
The Ferrari 275 GTB was a 2-seat front-engined Gran Turismo (Grand Touring) automobile produced by Ferrari between 1964 and 1968. It used a 3.3-liter (3286 cc) Colombo 60-degree V-12 engine and produced 280-300 horsepower.

The Pininfarina-designed body was a graceful evolution of the car's predecessor, the 250, and strongly contrasted with its replacement, the Daytona. The 275 introduced Ferrari's 'transaxle' concept, where the transmission and rear axle are integrated.

Ferrari followed the original Ferrari 275 GTB with an updated version launched at the 1965 Paris Show. It was dubbed the 'long-nose' edition for its slightly lengthened and lowered nose, a tweak designed to reduce front-end lift at high speeds. Its rear window was enlarged for better visibility, and the trunk hinges were now on the outside.

The standard 275 GTB coupe was produced by Scaglietti and was available with 3 or 6 Weber twin-choke carburetors. It was more of a pure sports car than the touring car that the GT name suggested. Some lightweight cars were built with an aluminum body.
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 06693
Luigi Chinetti imported this short-nose 275 and delivered it to Rezzahi Ferrari in San Francisco in 1965. A few years later it was resold by Charlie Hayes Ferrari. When purchased by the current owner in 1972 from a used car lot in Santa Barbara it had a long nose, installed after an accident in the late 1960s. Many years later Kimings Brothers of Torrance 're-made' the nose back to a factory dimensioned short nose again. Repainted in 1994 the car has been 'kept up' and restored as needed, much of the work being done by the owner himself who has collected parts for many years. Serial number 6693, this car is believed to be the twenty-eighth 275 off the assembly line.
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 07993
Sold for $4,620,000 at 2014 Gooding & Company.
The original owner of this Ferrari 275 GTB Long Nose Alloy bodied coupe was Haitian diplomat Albert Silvera. The order for the car was placed through the official North American distributor Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York. He requested the latest long-nose model with lightweight aluminum coachwork and finished in a distinctive color, Azzurro Perlato Acrillico, a vibrant electric blue that has since been nicknamed 'Blu Silvera.' The car was ordered with a number of special features, including six Weber 40 DCN/2 carburetors topped by velocity stacks, SNAP exhaust extractors, Koni shock absorbers, and Borrani RW 3874 wire wheels with Pirelli tires.

Upon completion, Silvera traveled to the Ferrari factory to personally take delivery of the car and brought along Robert M. Cressman of Cressman-Baumgarten Ferrari in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Upon receiving the car, Silvera entrusted the car to Sergio Scaglietti, who then personalized the Ferrari by trimming the dashboard in red leather to match the interior upholstery and fitting a custom armrest, driver and passenger headrests, removable seat cushions, and a radio console. Scaglietti also gave the car special chrome gills for the fender and sail-panel vents, and fabricated a split-rear bumper to showcase his diplomatic license plate.

After the unique features were completed, Mr. Silvera then drove his new 275 GTB from Modena to his home in Paris, where official Ferrari distributor Charles Pozzi SA performed the first service. From there, the Ferrari was flown to Florida and used on occasional outings when Silvera made use of his Miami home.

Silvera traded the car in April of 1967 to the Cressman-Baumgarten Ferrari dealership to make way for a new 275 GTB/4, chassis 09789. 07993 was sold to an elderly gentleman in Miami, who used the Ferrari sparingly and retained it until his death. In 1975, his estate sold the car through Milano Motors to David L. Flinn of Miami. The car passed through the ownership of Ferrari enthusiasts Steven Barney and Warren Mosler, before being sold to George Nuse of Norcross, Georgia, in 1984.

At some point, either during or just prior to Mr. Nuse's ownership, the car was re-finished in its present white livery. In 1989, Mr. Nuse sold the Ferrari to Ed Wettach of Jackson, Mississippi. The car remained in Mr. Wettach's collection from 1989 until 2002, when it was sold through his dealership, Ferrari of Atlanta, to Bob Lacovek, a resident of Illinois.

In January of 2008, Mr. Lacovek had the car certified by the Ferrari Classiche Department, who issued the Certifcazione di Autenticita and confirmed that the 275 GTB retains its original chassis, alloy body, suspension, brakes, engine (internal no. 848/64), and transaxle (internal no. 407).

The car current displays approximately 21,250 miles (in the Spring of 1983 the car had a record odometer reading of 9,039 miles and in the fall of 2002 it had 12,600 miles). Every feature specified by its original owner remains intact.
By Daniel Vaughan | Nov 2014
During the late sixties, Ferraris road-oriented berlinettas split in terms of design from their race cars. After the 250 short wheelbase berlinetta, the dual purpose road / race Ferrari seemed gone. This new distinction motivated Ferrari to manufacture more civil road cars having impressive specification. The first example of this new trend was the 275 GTB.

The 275 GTB/GTS was debuted in October 1964 at the Paris Salon. It was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scagliettie. The 275 GTB was based on the 250 GT Berlinetta Lusson and the 250 GTO. The GTS version drew styling from the 330 GT 2+2. Production continued through 1966.
The fastback Berlinetta coupe was the GTB series. This version was meant for driving on the road and at the track. The Open Spyder was the GTS series designed to replace the 250 California. This version was more comfortable and more suited for touring. Around 200 examples of the GTS were created during its two year production.

Being light, powerful and strikingly beautiful, the 275 was a very successful car for Ferrari. It sold well, with around 1000 examples made, and, as an afterthought, scored victories in endurance racing after the 250 LM was denied homologation.

By moving the transmission to rear of the car, better weight distribution was achieved. The engine used was a Colombo-derived V-12 engine that produced 260 horsepower in the GTS and 280 horsepower in the GTB. With the GTB version, an option was given to the buyer to purchase the vehicle with three or six Weber carburetors.

In 1965, Ferrari created three examples of the 275 GTB for the purpose of endurance motor sport racing. The vehicles were dubbed the 275 GTB/C and outfitted with a light-weight aluminum body, air vents for the brakes, six carburetors, and a 320 horsepower engine, and a few other minor mechanical modifications.

In 1966 the 275 GTB was re-introduced with a four-cam version of the V12. Six Webber carburetors aided in delivering around 300 horsepower. To cope with the new power, the GTB/4 was given wider tires and a ZF limited-slip differential. The 4 in the name GTB/4 represented the twin camshafts per cylinder bank totaling four. This was the first quad-cam road-going Ferrari ever created. It was easily distinguished by its bulge in the hood. During its production run lasting until 1968, around 320 examples of the 275 GTB/4 were created.

The 275 P and P2 were purpose built to Capture the World Championship and in the process beat Ford. The 275 P was powered by a 3.3-liter powerplant; a 4 and 4.4 liter version were also used. These mid-engined, open-topped cars were comprised of many of the same components as the road-going versions.
By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2006
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 06609
Unveiled at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, the Ferrari 275 GTB was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti between 1964 and 1968. The 275 GTB was fitted with a 3.3 litre Colombo designed overhead-cam V12 engine with Weber carburetors that produced around 300 horsepower and was Ferrari's first road going model with a five speed trans axle transmission. This short nose 275 GTB, named 'Walter' after Walter Matthau's favorite Ferrari in the movie A New Leaf, was acquired by its current owner in 1985 and has competed in various Ferrari Club rallies and track events including the Virginia City Hill Climb.
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 07751
Engine Num: 07751
Sold for $1,375,000 at 2013 RM Auctions.
Ferrari introduced their 275 GTB at the 1964 Paris Salon and it was designed as the successor to the long-running, popular, and successful 250 GT. The engine was an enlarged 3.3-liter version of the classic Colombo V-12, and this was the first Maranello road car to be given independent rear suspension and a rear-mounted, five-speed transaxle. About a year after the car's introduction, Ferrari introduced a longer, redesigned nose for the 275. This new design was intended to assist aerodynamic downforce at high speed. The 'short-nose' examples totaled just 250 cars.

This particular example is a late short-nose 275 GTB that has been in the care of just one owner for the past 37 years. It was used sparingly and is an undamaged example that retains all of its original bodywork, interior, and drivetrain components. It is one of the few late short-nose cars to feature an 'interim' driveline that was subsequently utilized on the 275's later competition variant, the 275 GTB/C. In fact, 07751 was built very late amongst the short-nose cars but shortly after the official debut of the long-nose prototype. It was built with various elements of both designs. It has hanging pedals, a wood grain dashboard, and enlarged footwell - improvements that were made over the lifespan of the short-nose cars.

During the life of the 275 GTB, Ferrari used three different driveline configurations. The earliest cars were given an open Hotchkiss-style normal u-joint setup. The use of a rear-mounted transaxle required this driveshaft to rotate at a much higher speed than a conventional one, making proper alignment critical for the elimination of any vibration. Overtime, these drivelines often became misaligned. As a result, Ferrari switched to a constant velocity (CV) joint setup with a center bearing (referred to as the 'interim' driveline setup), which made the alignment process much simpler. It is believed that perhaps just 10 such cars were given this 'interim' setup. Ferrari ultimately switched to a torque tube setup that effectively bolted the clutch housing to the transaxle at the rear, fixing them together as a unit.

This car was sent to coachbuilder Scaglietti in July 1965 to be clothed in Pininfarina's body design. The work was completed in September and finished in Oro Chiaro (light gold) paint with an interior trimmed in Nero (black) Connolly leather.

07751 is an American-export example with instruments in miles. It was delivered new for retail to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York in September of 1965. It was soon sold to a Mr. Freedman, of New York City. A decade later, with less than 23,000 miles on the odometer, it was repainted in red. It was offered for sale by a Pennsylvania-based owner in September of 1975. The current owner acquired it two months later. Shortly after purchasing the car, a comprehensive rebuild of the original V-12 engine began. This was followed by a full, bare-metal media-blast in red. Upon completion, the car was shown at numerous exhibits and events over the years.

Currently, the car shows approximately 50,000 original miles. It has its original starburst-style Campagnolo alloy wheels, wood-rimmed steering wheel and shift knob, carpets, deck straps, and seats. The bodywork and glass are original to the car and display the correct Securit watermarks.
By Daniel Vaughan | Jan 2016
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 07933
Sold for $1,042,563 (€784,000) at 2010 RM Auctions.
Completed in early fall of 1965, Ferrari 275 GTB 6C number 07933 appears to be only the second Long Nose 275 GTB to be fitted with an all-aluminum body and was originally painted Argento. Ferrari showed this successor to the 250 Series at the Paris Salon in 1964 and while its Colombo two-cam, 3.3-liter V-12 was familiar, its layout was new. The Ferrari 275 GTB was the first road-going Ferrari to have an independent rear suspension as well as a rear-mounted transaxle. It was available starting in 1965 as the 275 GTB coupe and the 275 GTS convertible, the latter having entirely different body work from the coupe. The GTBs typically had 280 horsepower motors while the convertibles delivered 260 horsepower. A six Weber 40 DCN 9 carburetors 300 horsepower state-of-tune was available in both cars as well. It was first sold to Luigi Chinetti in Glen Cove, New York.
Coupe
Coachwork: Scaglietti
Designer: Pininfarina
Chassis Num: 8011
This alloy-bodied 275 GTB was originally built in 1965 for Swedish racing driver Sture Nottorp of Goteborg, who requested this rare combination of Notte Bleu paintwork and Rosso leather upholstery. It was specifically ordered for the 1966 Monte Carlo Rally with a high-performance Tipo 231 engine with six Weber carburetors, up-rated cylinder-heads, and a GTO type exhaust system by Abarth. Before the start of the rally, the car was displayed with powerful additional lighting at the Swedish Sports Car Show in Goteborg. Sadly, Nottorp withdrew the Ferrari from the rally due to his failing eyesight, but he used it as his road car until 1969. After several additional Swedish owners the GTB was sent to Ferrari in the early 1970s, and the body was returned to its original configuration by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. The car was brought to the United States in 2007, and its current owner recently carried out a full restoration.
During the late sixties, Ferraris road-oriented berlinettas split in terms of design from their race cars. After the 250 short wheelbase berlinetta, the dual purpose road / race Ferrari seemed gone. This new distinction motivated Ferrari to manufacture more civil road cars having impressive specification. The first example of this new trend was the 275 GTB.

The 275 GTB/GTS was debuted in October 1964 at the Paris Salon. It was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scagliettie. The 275 GTB was based on the 250 GT Berlinetta Lusson and the 250 GTO. The GTS version drew styling from the 330 GT 2+2. Production continued through 1966.

The fastback Berlinetta coupe was the GTB series. This version was meant for driving on the road and at the track. The Open Spyder was the GTS series designed to replace the 250 California. This version was more comfortable and more suited for touring. Around 200 examples of the GTS were created during its two year production.

Being light, powerful and strikingly beautiful, the 275 was a very successful car for Ferrari. It sold well, with around 1000 examples made, and, as an afterthought, scored victories in endurance racing after the 250 LM was denied homologation.

By moving the transmission to rear of the car, better weight distribution was achieved. The engine used was a Colombo-derived V-12 engine that produced 260 horsepower in the GTS and 280 horsepower in the GTB. With the GTB version, an option was given to the buyer to purchase the vehicle with three or six Weber carburetors.

In 1965, Ferrari created three examples of the 275 GTB for the purpose of endurance motor sport racing. The vehicles were dubbed the 275 GTB/C and outfitted with a light-weight aluminum body, air vents for the brakes, six carburetors, and a 320 horsepower engine, and a few other minor mechanical modifications.

In 1966 the 275 GTB was re-introduced with a four-cam version of the V12. Six Webber carburetors aided in delivering around 300 horsepower. To cope with the new power, the GTB/4 was given wider tires and a ZF limited-slip differential. The 4 in the name GTB/4 represented the twin camshafts per cylinder bank totaling four. This was the first quad-cam road-going Ferrari ever created. It was easily distinguished by its bulge in the hood. During its production run lasting until 1968, around 320 examples of the 275 GTB/4 were created.

The 275 P and P2 were purpose built to Capture the World Championship and in the process beat Ford. The 275 P was powered by a 3.3-liter powerplant; a 4 and 4.4 liter version were also used. These mid-engined, open-topped cars were comprised of many of the same components as the road-going versions.
By Daniel Vaughan | Oct 2006
 
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